Thursday evening saw the failure of all three of the network news outlets to report on the massive legal blow to ObamaCare. In her decision, U.S. District Judge Rosemary Collyer ruled that the Obama administration’s unilateral funding of $175 billion to insurance subsidies was unconstitutional. The ruling was a major win for House Republicans, a victory that was a long time coming. With a lack of funding through the subsidies, and large insurance companies fleeing the exchanges, ObamaCare might be on its last leg. 



Things must be getting grim on the Obamacare front if the Obama administration feels it must send "Zeke the Bleak" Emanuel out to defend it.

Though he was on relatively good behavior compared to previous interviews he has given, Emanuel, rather than visibly losing his cool, kept on using Stuart Varney's first name in his responses during a Fox Business interview this week to the point where it nearly came off as an attempt at parent-child condescension.



On Monday's New Day, CNN's Phil Mattingly revealed his sympathy for Hillary Clinton's campaign. John Berman pointed out how Clinton's rival, Bernie Sanders, unveiled his Medicare-for-all health care plan mere hours before Sunday's Democratic presidential debate on NBC. Mattingly remarked, "I felt bad for the Clinton staffers who had so many great lines written up about his health care plan and its lack of details — that they just had to toss into the wastebasket two hours before — very, very depressing on that end."



Another Democratic candidate forum, seen by few, went as expected.



For a change, Martin Crutsinger's coverage at the Associated Press of the federal government's November Monthly Treasury Statement wasn't completely full of rose-colored baloney.

Crutsinger managed to note how auto-pilot entitlement programs like Social Security and Medicare are bankrupting the country (not in those words, of course). That said, he somehow thought that highlighting a rare and small increase in year-over-year defense spending was worthwhile, while ignoring several other larger percentage increases in other areas. Most importantly, he failed to note that the national debt has increased by far more than Uncle Sam's reported deficits. Excerpts follow the jump (bolds and numbered tags are mine):



The debate rages on as to whether Donald Trump represents the essence of the Republican party. Very broadly speaking, conservatives say he doesn’t and liberals say he does. One liberal, Michael Tomasky, claims that Trump, despite his left-of-center positions on several fiscal and economic issues, nonetheless embodies the “two qualities more than any others [that] have driven conservatism in our time.”

The first quality, wrote Tomasky in the September 24 issue of The New York Review of Books, “is cultural and racial resentment…The second is what we might call spectacle—the unrelenting push toward a rhetorical style ever more gladiatorial and ever more outraged…Trump is conservative resentment and spectacle made flesh.”



The top English and Spanish networks refused on Tuesday evening to cover the findings of a federal audit report from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Inspector General (OIG) that concluded that just under $3 billion in ObamaCare subsidies have been unable to be properly verified that, according to the audit, puts taxpayer funding “at risk.” While the broadcast networks ignored this story, the FNC's Special Report devoted a one-minute-and-48-second segment to the IG’s findings. 



It was the best of coverage - it was the worst of coverage.



Esquire’s Pierce deems Ryan “the single biggest fake in American public life” and declares that he “should have no more credibility on [fiscal] issues than does Sarah Palin, his predecessor in the second spot on the [Republican] ticket. Any Democratic congresscritter who seeks to make a deal with him should be drummed out of Washington. Any reporter or pundit who takes his plans for the economy seriously should be reassigned to the custodial staff.”



On Monday’s NBC Nightly News, Brian Williams heaped praise on liberal Democratic Governor Jerry Brown of California, who was sworn in for a record fourth term. Williams hailed Brown as someone who was had “finally been able to turn around California's troubled finances.”

As highlighted on this site Monday night, the State of California’s finances are far from stellar when examined more closely. An article in the Los Angeles Times late Thursday on the Golden State’s soaring health care costs only further expanded on that. 



According to MSNBC, Republicans are always making things worse. On the July 25 edition of Ronan Farrow Daily, the cable host began a segment entitled “Kinder, Gentler GOP?” after playing a clip of Rand Paul at the National Urban League annual conference speaking of the “poverty problem.” Farrow asked his guests a stream of leading questions insinuating that Republicans are “catering to a demographic that may have lost Republicans the last general election” rather than actually working to aid low income individuals. 

While the president of the National Urban League Marc Morial tried to avoid being too overtly political, MSNBC analyst and former DNC communications director Karen Finney made it clear that Republicans “tend to be policy ideas that actually make things worse, not better.” They oppose “things like an increase in the minimum wage or equal pay for women that we know could actually help communities of color.” (See video below)



Discussing the Kentucky Senate race between Mitch McConnell (R) and Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes (D), All In’s Chris Hayes cheered the Democratic candidate on, despite blatant falsehoods in her political ads. While Hayes did note those errors in the segment, he brushed them aside to say that in reality those lies are the truth.

The ad featured Grimes sitting next to a coal miner who claimed that McConnell voted to raise his Medicare costs to $6,000. Hayes stated correctly that this was false and that the man would “most likely not have been affected by the proposed Medicare changes.” Hayes then brought on Brian Beutler of The New Republic to discuss, at which point they both came to the conclusion that Grimes’s claims are really, actually, kind of accurate. Confused? You are not alone. [MP3 audio here; video below]