In a Tuesday post at the American Enterprise Institute's "AEI Ideas" blog, Marc Thiessen called out "The media hypocrisy over Trump’s intelligence leak." While acknowledging that the Trump-related leak, if true (very big if), would be "indeed a disaster" — though, as National Review's Andy McCarthy has noted, still within Trump's unreviewable authority" as President —Thiessen noted that the current hyperventilation is coming from "the same news outlets that regularly, and intentionally, published highly classified intelligence in recent years, based on leaks from the Obama administration."

President Trump is about to score a religious trifecta, visiting Saudi Arabia, Israel and Rome, the "home" of three monotheistic religions. The president has said he wants to make the ultimate deal and achieve peace between Israel and the Palestinians. While the goal is similar to a high school kid attempting to hit a curve ball from an all-star pitcher, the scenario cannot end well for Israel. How do I know this? One has only to look at history. 

Better not show the latest video of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to Washington Post media columnist Margaret Sullivan. She has already revealed that she is triggered just by the term "fake news" and the video of Netanyahu accusing CNN and the New York Times of reporting fake news about Hamas would probably cause her to wilt from such a macroaggression. 

On the day after Earth Day's "March for Science," it seems appropriate to point to a column by University of Michigan History Professor Juan Cole in The Nation, a far-far-left publication considered a credible and authoritative go-to-source by the liberal intelligentsia. On April 18, Cole, echoing statements made during their final years in power by Barack Obama and his administration's officials with establishment press acquiescence, nonsensically claimed that Syria's biggest problem during the past decade has been ... carbon dioxide. Hardly.

The terrorist sympathizers at the New York Times got in hot water Monday, after readers rightly noted an op-ed published in Monday’s paper was written by a convicted murderer and terrorist, yet the article did not make that plain. Its author, Marwan Barghouti, former leader of the Tanzim wing of the Palestinian Fatah terrorist movement, used the space given to him by the Times to demonize Israel and draw sympathy for his anti-Israel agenda.

On April 5, The New York Times published an op-ed by retired Gen. Stanley McChrystal headlined “Save PBS. It Makes Us Safer.” McChrystal now runs a big lobbying firm, so that may be why he cares so much: he’s a gun for hire. So how does the general think PBS makes us “safer,” and from what? The answer: commercialism.

But PBS isn't making us safer from suicide bombers. It's teaching the need to sympathize with them.



On Thursday New York Times reporter Somini Sengupta “reported” on United Nations ambassador Nikki Haley’s criticizing the United Nations in a speech to that international body, in “American Envoy Calls U.N. Human Rights Council ‘Corrupt.’” The text box: “Praising the U.S. and assailing a panel without evidence.” From the start it read less like a news report than a line-by-line hostile fact-check: "The American envoy to the United Nations, Nikki R. Haley, described the United States on Wednesday as the “moral conscience” of the world, and she dismissed the United Nations Human Rights Council as “so corrupt” without offering evidence."

Of all the current event subjects one could devote attention to, the NBC Nightly News on Sunday bizarrely ran a two-minute full report on a new hotel in Bethlehem that displays anti-Israel art, and essentially lobbies against the security barrier that was erected over a decade ago to protect Israelis from terrorism. As the piece relayed the artist's opposition to the barrier, nowhere did the report remind viewers of why it was built in the first place: to ward off Palestinian Arab suicide bombers.

Following President Trump’s Wednesday press conference with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, NBC News White House correspondent Kristen Welker passive aggressively savaged Christian Broadcast Network’s David Brody and Townhall editor Katie Pavlich for questions to Trump that Welker deemed not to be “tough questions” concerning Mike Flynn.

With the Super Bowl done and gone, it’s going to be a long offseason for pro football fans. For a growing, vocal and unhappy band of leftist brothers, the offseason can’t last long enough.

As Minnesota Democratic Representative and DNC chair candidate Keith Ellison appeared as a guest on Sunday's Face the Nation on CBS to react to President Donald Trump's recent restrictions on immigration, host John Dickerson made a feeble attempt to get the far left Congressman to respond to the anti-Defamation League slamming him for anti-Israel comments he made at a private meeting in 2010. Without giving any details on what exactly the ADL was criticizing him for, Dickerson waited until the end of the segment to pose: "You're running to be the head of the Democratic National Committee. You're going to be in these debates with President Trump, and I want to ask you something about -- the Anti-Defamation League has looked at comments you made in 2010, and said they are disqualifying for you to be head of the DNC. What's your response? What's your response to that? The comments were about U.S. favoring Israel over Muslim countries."

Apparently defending an Islamic terrorist sympathizer was not enough for Showtime's Homeland. For good measure, they have to demonize Israeli settlers for their mere existence on the West Bank.