Amanda Taub’s “Interpreter” piece on the upcoming election in France, in Friday’s New York Times was snottily headlined “A Small French Town Infused With Us-vs.-Them Politics.” That town, Frejus, was no doubt also infused with current events, as suggested by the Times’ own lead story on Friday: “Gunman In Paris Shoots Officer; Terrorism Seen.” Taub managed to completely ignore that issue in favor of condescending theories about France’s “us and them” ethnocentrism, making Taub’s think piece chiding the town’s punitive politics (doubtless written before the attack) look both out of date and sanctimoniously naïve.


The press's determination to gin up criticism of President Donald Trump at every conceivable turn was on clear display yesterday at the Associated Press. In its timeline coverage of the Paris terrorist attack which left one police officer dead and two seriously wounded, the AP deliberately twisted Trump's comment that it "looks like another terrorist attack."


In the moments following President Trump’s Thursday press conference with Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni, MSNBC and its myirad of guests swiftly condemned Trump for referring to the deadly shooting in Paris on the Champs-Élysées as a terrorist attack. 


Appearing on MSNBC in the 3 p.m. ET hour on Thursday, during breaking news coverage of a shooting along the Champs Elysees in Paris, Daily Beast World News Editor Christopher Dickey was more worried by the prospect of France’s “very far-right party” using the incident as an issue in the nation’s upcoming presidential election than he was with the welfare of people caught up in the violence. 


Appearing as a guest on Thursday's The Last Word on MSNBC, Daily Beast foreign editor and MSNBC political commentator Christopher Dickey aimed snide name-calling at White House advisor Steve Bannon. After calling him a "snob," the liberal commentator also remarked that he looks like a "slob" and a "dirty old man," as he went along with host Lawrence O'Donnell's suggestion that the Donald Trump advisor looks homeless. O'Donnell described Bannon as looking like he "slept in the subway last night" as he wondered how people in France view the Donald Trump advisor: "So what do they think when they see the guy who looks like he slept in the subway last night and he's the one who's talking to the President?"


Recent terrorist attacks in Ankara, Turkey, and Berlin, Germany, add to a growing list of incidents that are becoming increasingly difficult to remember. Does one begin the list with the plane hijackings in the '60s and '70s, or the first World Trade Center bombing in 1993, or the USS Cole attack in 2000, or the second World Trade Center attack in 2001, or Ft. Hood, San Bernardino, Orlando, Paris or Nice? And that's not all of them, nor will it be the end of them, if we don't have a better response.


On Thursday, CBS and NBC's evening newscasts played up the "controversy exploding around the world over so-called burkinis," after several French city governments banned the Islamic swimming garment. CBS's James Brown previewed the subject by trumpeting, "Nuns go to the beach in their habits; so why has France banned the burkini?" NBC's Kelly Cobiella spotlighted protests against the ban, and gave a slanted description of the burkini: "A bikini that's more like a burqa, covering almost everything, and designed to give Muslim women more freedom."


The New York Times on Friday offered a one-two punch when it came to defending French Muslims and particularly women wearing “burkinis” that allow them to comply with Islamic laws of women staying completely covered and lambasting those raising concerns about women’s rights as “farcical” and downright “bigotry” preventing French women from “widen[ing] their sense of identity.”


Appearing as a panel member on Monday's New Day on CNN, during a discussion of the possibility that GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump's proposed immigration restrictions to prevent Muslim terrorists from entering the country could effect immigration from European countries, CNN political analyst David Gregory tried to undermine the idea by bringing up anti-Semitic State Department officials from the 1940s who lobbied against allowing German Jews to immigrate into the U.S., resulting in more Holocaust victims who otherwise could have been saved. It was not mentioned that, in the same NBC Meet the Press interview that was cited for the CNN discussion, Trump promised to help set up safe havens for Syrian refugees rather than just abandon them to Muslim extremists.


We are so fortunate to have expert psychoanalyst Judy Woodruff on call at PBS. (That's sarcasm, folks.)

Friday evening, Woodruff, apparently because whatever evidence there is of ISIS involvement in Thursday's terrorist massacre in Nice, France is in her view insufficiently direct, speculated that "It could have been the act of one person disgruntled, upset with his life."


On Thursday's The O'Reilly Factor on FNC, during a discussion of the terrorist attack in Nice, France, self-described liberal Republican FNC analyst Geraldo Rivera seemed to be in touch with his more right-leaning side as he criticized President Barack Obama for not dealing with ISIS and depriving them of a safe haven from which to attack the West.

Rivera declared that "I want to love the President," but then lamented that President Obama's Cairo speech in his first term was "misguided," as he "just didn't understand the Middle East." The FNC liberal further complained that "sometimes he's too cool for school."


Univision finds itself unable, yet again, to suppress the urge to absolve radical Islam in the wake of another terrorist attack. The latest instance in what has become a predictable pattern comes in the aftermath of the horrific Bastille Day attack in Nice, France.