It has been a week since the disturbing allegations came to light that Rob Porter, a now-former White House staffer close to the President, had a history of domestic abuse against his two ex-wives. And during that time, the evening newscasts of the major network news outlets (ABC, CBS, and NBC) had dedicated almost a combined hour to the story. But when it came to similar accusations against congressional Democrats, they couldn’t be bothered.


CNN set a possible new low for themselves Sunday morning when their Inside Politics panel of liberal journalists obnoxiously complained that Vice President Mike Pence didn’t shake the hand of Kim Yo-jong, Kim Jong-un’s sister and the head of the Propaganda and Agitation Department. “South Korea views this as a major milestone and a chance, a chance to see if an Olympics detente can bring a broader diplomatic opening, but the Vice President sees it as propaganda period,” bemoaned host, John King.


Recall the outrage from Washington Post liberal columnist Jennifer Rubin when President Trump said George W. Bush was “unpatriotic"? Or when Trump said of Democrats that they had “acted like terrorists” during the budget fight?
Or when Trump attacked Democrats for “purposely sabotaging the country’s economic recovery” and added that “These guys bet against America all the time”? 


New York Times media columnist Jim Rutenberg’s essay for The Wilson Quarterly was hailed as a “behind-the-scenes look” at the paper coming to journalistic life after being attacked by Trump: “How ‘Fake News’ Changed The New York Times – and Didn’t.” The first subhead of the Wilson Quarterly piece gave the game away: “Suddenly, Our Mission Got Really Clear” (Right when Trump became president!) Remember that it was Rutenberg who penned the notorious front-page jeremiad on August 8, 2016, "The Challenge Trump Poses to Objectivity." He asked, “If you're a working journalist and you believe that Donald J. Trump is a demagogue playing to the nation's worst racist and nationalistic tendencies....how the heck are you supposed to cover him?"


A tale of two speeches: On Thursday, the New York Times Sheryl Gay Stolberg celebrated House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s marathon speech, “8 Hours, 7 Minutes and 1 Pelosi Soliloquy.” While not wholly laudatory, Stolberg fawned over Pelosi’s "heart-rending" defense of the so-called Dreamers. Sen. Rand Paul also delivered a delaying tactic of a speech, but Rand isn't nearly so highly regarded at the Times, accused of "bemoaning" and "sloganeering."


After it was made public that President Trump had requested the Pentagon to plan a military parade through Washington, DC, there was a steady stream of forceful condemnation of the President in which they claimed he was imitating foreign dictators. And in an appearance on Fox News’ Tucker Carlson Tonight Thursday, Hill media reporter Joe Concha knocked them for playing up their outrage and playing to an audience.


Conservative talk radio host Rush Limbaugh took on CNN senior political analyst Ron Brownstein and CNN Tonight host Don Lemon during his eponymous Thursday show, thrashing Brownstein for condemning criticism of the FBI and Lemon for being “totally blind to any opposing view.”


There is a little doubt that a segment of the sports press and the public would prefer that athletes with conservative and Christian beliefs keep their views to themselves (but secular and leftist views are fine). This became evident after the Super Bowl, when one sportswriter and the Twitter mob strongly criticized NBC's Tony Dungy, a Super Bowl-winning coach himself, for citing Philadelphia Eagle quarterback Nick Foles' self-professed Christian faith as contributing to his success.


The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped by over 1,000 points by Thursday's closing and the folks at ABC News were eager to place the blame on someone during World News Tonight. That someone, of course, was President Trump and the much welcomed GOP tax cuts, which were responsible for generous bonuses and wage increases across the country.


CNN’s organizational hypocrisy was on full display Wednesday night as host Erin Burnett kicked off OutFront by declaring that “Republicans are at it again” with their crazy conspiracy theories! Turns out, the alleged conspiracy theory was just a question raised by Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson in his Homeland Security Committee’s interim report on the Clinton e-mail scandal.


On Wednesday's Good Morning America, ABC correspondent Linsey Davis tried to link President Donald Trump to a controversial religious figure in a way that it is unlikely that the news show would do if it involved a Democratic President instead. Near the end of a report updating viewers on the unusually bad flu season, Davis showed video of evangelist Gloria Copeland suggesting that it was not necessary to get a flu shot, alleging that prayer could prevent the flu, before the ABC reporter identified her as "an advisor on the President's evangelical board."

 


New York Times immigration correspondent Vivian Yee responded defensively to Trump tweeting about the death of NFL player Edwin Jackson by an alleged drunk-driving illegal immigrant, in “Politics At Play In a Death On I-70.” The online headline to the Wednesday story: “How an N.F.L. Player’s Death Turned Into a Political Exhibit.” Of course, the Times regularly uses tragedy to push dubiously connected political issues, like “climate change” in the aftermath of a deadly hurricane.