Wasn't one vapid pretty boy named Justin from Canada enough? At least Justin Bieber is eye candy without the heartburn. Justin Trudeau, on the other hand, is the twinkly-eyed boy toy who makes informed adults wanna hurl. For more than a year, the liberal Canadian prime minister enjoyed drool-stained global press coverage as the "hot hipster" and "dreamy sex symbol" with great hair and a tribal Haida tattoo. He basked in Ryan Gosling-esque memes about his commitment to feminism and touched off "Trudeau-mania" with a series of shirtless selfies and photobombs.



In a statement following the death of Cuban dictator Fidel Castro, President Obama spoke of "the countless ways in which (Castro) altered the course of individual lives, families, and of the Cuban nation." That's an understatement as the thousands who have risked their lives over the years to escape from Cuba have testified.



Journalists like to point out the 1950s and ’60s classic cars dominating Cuba’s streets, but in the wake of dictator Fidel Castro’s death they largely ignored the story those cars tell.

Those vintage cars are emblematic of the island nation’s constricted economy and the way the regime’s oppression led to poverty and reduced economic growth.



Al presentador de Univision Jorge Ramos le tomó apenas tres segundos para marcar el tono de la edición post-Fidel de su progama semanal de discusión de asuntos políticos Al Punto. Con una sola frase, Ramos puso en evidencia al resto de la prensa estáblishment.



CBS This Morning co-host Charlie Rose again reported from Cuba on Tuesday, trumpeting the “legacy” of the “thunderous” Fidel Castro and the “anguish” over his death. Aside from one passing mention about the dictator’s violence, the focus was entirely on praise for Castro. Talking to one person, Rose recounted, “Many were overcome, either by the heat or by grief. ‘He is living eternally now,’ this man says.” 



The New York Times has treated the passing of Cuba’s Fidel Castro less as the death of a dictator than the dying of a revolutionary dream. Former Miami bureau chief Damien Cave’s off-lead story from Havana on Monday interviewed three generations of Cubans, but only came within glancing distance of the truth of the tyrannical leader, treating him more as an eccentric relative than a man who has jailed harassed and left impoverished three generations of his countrymen. In the past Cave has obsessed over hypothetical "income inequality" in a more capitalist, freedom-embracing Cuba.



There’s cross-ideological agreement that Tom Morello (currently of Prophets of Rage, formerly of Rage Against the Machine and Audioslave) is a superb guitarist. It’s a different story when it comes to his political acumen, which some would say is about as impressive as the singing talent of Florence Foster Jenkins. Morello, a staunch leftist who’s given to comments such as “words like ‘socialism’ and ‘Marxism’ have been so demonized that it's difficult to have intelligent discussion about what they mean,” was at it again in a Saturday Instagram post concerning the death of Fidel Castro, writing that “by defying Yankee imperialism for 50 years, instituting the best healthcare, child immunization and literacy systems in the Western Hemisphere (surpassing the US and Canada), exporting doctors to countries in need all over the globe…and being an unrepentant advocate of the poor and exploited it is no surprise that millions will mourn [Castro's] passing.”



The Monday night after ABC reported Fidel Castro’s death live from Havana, Cuba, World News Tonight paid little mind to the Cuban exiles in Miami, Florida celebrating the death of the tyrant. Instead Anchor David Muir rambled on as he hyped his flight home from Havana to Miami. “Our journey back beginning at the Havana airport where we learned we would be boarding the first commercial flight from Havana to Miami in decades,” Muir said as he we visibly excited to receive his inaugural certificate.



During Sunday morning's edition of the Cable News Network's Inside Politics program, host John King read part of President Barack Obama's statement on the death of Fidel Castro before asking why the Democratic occupant of the White House did not mention the brutalities the 90-year-old dictator inflicted on his fellow Cubans for six decades.

Guest panelist Ed O'Keefe of the Washington Post responded by calling the lack of that information “stunning” and slamming Obama's remarks as “an incredible dismissal of reality” and “a real missed opportunity” for the president to identify with the Cuban people.



The latest breaking news in US foreign relations concerning the end of Cuba’s Castro era was debated among Cuban-Americans on the cast of Monday’s Morning Joe. The MSNBC hosts Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski invited three Cuban-Americans: FOX News contributor and author Humberto Fontova along with GOP strategist Alex Castellanos to discuss former CNN host Soledad O’Brien’s defense of President Obama’s controversial comments about Castro’s “complicated” legacy. Evidently, the death of the Communist dictator who played a central role in sparking the Cuban Missile Crisis at the height of the Cold War, remains subject to ideological interpretation within the mainstream media.



Appearing on MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell Reports on Monday, Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson warned President-elect Donald Trump against reversing President Obama’s executive order opening diplomatic relations with Cuba. The liberal pundit argued that putting pressure on the authoritarian regime would be “the one thing that could keep Fidel Castro, metaphorically, and his revolution alive and his system of oppression alive...”



Media Research Center President Brent Bozell on Monday blasted liberals who have fawned over Fidel Castro. Appearing on Fox Business in the wake of the dictator’s death, Bozell explained, “Fidel Castro has been a darling of the far-left since 1958. It goes back decade after decade after decade where the radical-left has just been infatuated by him and Che Guevara.”