The New York Times on Monday marked the 50th anniversary of the death of Fidel Castro henchman and murderous Communist thug Che Guevara. The paper’s Andes bureau chief Nicholas Casey filed “Execution Haunts Village 50 Years After Guevara’s Death.” The left has long been infatuated with the Communist killer, and will read nothing to change their minds in the Times' blandishment remembrance from Bolivia, marking Guevara’s execution.



On Wednesday, I criticized Helen Gao at the New York Times for praising the "emancipation of women" in China under communist tyrant Mao Ze Dong. I also noted that in 2005, Times columnist Nicholas Kristof had engaged in similar "Mao was not all that bad" argumentation while reviewing a book conclusively showing that the death toll under Mao was over 70 million.



On Friday’s Morning Joe, Willie Geist hosted a panel to discuss the latest news on the Russian hacking narrative regarding Facebook ads that were purportedly used by Russian intelligence to stoke "racial tensions" during the 2016 presidential election. The panel’s primary reaction, with only one dissenting voice, was to call for increased government "regulation" and financial “penalties in the hundreds of millions” to shut down alleged Russian influencers.



In its roughly 30th installment of "Red Century," a weekly series of op-eds dedicated to the notion that 20th century communism wasn't all that bad, the New York Times performed a bit of perhaps inadvertent recycling. On Monday, Helen Gao, in an item the Times appears to have had the good sense to keep out of its print edition, argued, with "crucial caveats" (but not enough of them) that "the Communist revolution taught Chinese women to dream big." Times columnist Nicholas Kristof infamously said much the same thing in 2005.



On Wednesday’s Morning Joe, while discussing Roy Moore’s victory in the Republican Alabama Senate primary, Joe Scarborough and Jon Meacham mused about the possibility of a ‘chaotic,’ ‘left-wing,’ ‘populist’ political movement coming about in the future in response to politicians like Moore. In the process, everyone on the panel apparently forgot about the existence of Antifa, Black Lives Matter, or even the insurgent candidacy of Bernie Sanders last year in the Democratic presidential primaries.



"The highest patriotism is not a blind acceptance of official policy, but a love of one's country deep enough to call her to a higher plain." -- Sen. George McGovern (D-SD) Filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick have performed a vital public service in making their documentary "The Vietnam War" for PBS. Given the division that war caused in America, it is a pretty fair chronicling of the way things were half a century ago. The film brought back a lot of mostly bad memories to people of my generation.



On Friday’s Morning Joe, the show’s panel reacted to the latest developments in the heated standoff between North Korea and the United States with exasperation, fear, and loathing, but not just at Kim Jong-un. In fact, Trump was the target of the greater wrath and consternation of the panel because he once again said mean things about North Korea’s ‘Dear Leader’ and his devil’s den of a country.



Not surprisingly, Lyin’ Brian Williams prevailed during the Media Research Center’s 30th Anniversary Gala featuring the 2017 DisHonors Awards as the winner of the Dan Rather Memorial Award for the Stupidest Analysis thanks to a bonkers quote about life in communist Cuba. The Federalist’s Senior Editor Mollie Hemingway served as the category’s presenter while House Freedom Caucus Chairman and Republican Congressman Mark Meadows (N.C.) accepted the award in jest on Williams’s behalf.



On Wednesday’s Morning Joe, the guests and hosts actually had a moderately balanced (particularly by MSNBC standards) discussion running for much of the broadcast with respect to evaluating Trump’s address to the United Nations General Assembly yesterday.  However, in a segment with former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, hosts Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski facilitated her unleashing a series of ridiculous assertions about Trump’s speech completely unchecked by basic reality.



On Monday's Morning Joe, MSNBC host Mika Brzezinski made a remarkable comeback performance after being away both Thursday and Friday of last week. Somehow, in her obsessive ranting centered around Trump’s retweet of a random Twitter user’s joke and another tweet that called Kim Jong Un “Rocket Man,” Brzezinski managed to fit in enough nonsense to fill at least three days of normal MSNBC content.  



On Friday's Morning Joe, Katty Kay, English anchor for BBC World News America, came to the baffling conclusion that Vietnam is “a temple of capitalism and commitment to all of the things that Americans hold dear,” and documentary filmmaker Ken Burns seemed to agree.



Liberal Daily Show host Trevor Noah did what few on the left have done so far, on his August 31 show: He actually condemned the radical leftist antifa group for resorting to violence. While many on the left turn a blind eye at the group’s insistence and justification for their violent tactics, Noah called them out on it: “You don't realize when you think you are punching Nazis, you don't realize that you are also punching your cause,” he lectured.