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The Big Three Networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) were in their prime Wednesday night, as they once again got the opportunity to hammer President Trump while raising up their former presidential candidate. Two-time failed presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was publishing a new memoir about her experience during the 2016 election and released audio of herself reading from the section retelling the horrific tale of the second presidential debate. And the Big Three Networks ate it all up.


First, it was almost seven solid months of 24/7 Russia Russia Russia blasting from the mainstream media. Recently that vanished to be replaced by a new MSM theme, Racist Racist Racist. And after President Donald Trump's rally on Tuesday in Phoenix, it has morphed into Crazy Crazy Crazy.  Only the most fringe elements out there are continuing to place their faith in Trump leaving office because of supposed collusion with the Russians. That is so first half of 2017.


Wesley Morris, the New York Times critic at large with a focus (or obsession) with race in entertainment, declared a “white supremacy summer” on television and in the movies in a long essay posted Wednesday, “In Movies and on TV, Racism Made Plain.” Earlier headlines were even more provocative: “In Virginia and on TV, A Supremacist Summer,” and the URL suggests that the phrase “white hot supremacist summer” made a headline appearance as well.


On Wednesday, NPR's Morning Edition surprisingly featured former U.N. Ambassador Andrew Young, who opposes the dismantling of Confederate memorials across the United States. Young, a close associate of Martin Luther King, contended that the controversy was "a total distraction that is undercutting most of the progress we made." Journalist Ailsa Chang zeroed in on the Confederate sculpture on Stone Mountain in Georgia and pointed out that "a lot of Black Lives Matter activists would probably disagree with you."


The Twitter website has become the go-to place for people in the “mainstream media” who have said things they wish they hadn’t stated on television. They can then apologize in a format that far fewer individuals will notice. A perfect example of this principle took place on Tuesday, August 22, by Bret Stephens, a right-of-center columnist for the New York Times who was also hired by NBC News and MSNBC on Wednesday, June 28.


If the late Tuesday and early Wednesday Don Lemon-led CNN Tonight wouldn’t go down in infamy for its deranged reaction to President Trump’s Arizona rally, the 1:00 a.m. hour drove the nail in the coffin. Most significantly, Lemon falsely claimed that Ronald Reagan already had Alzheimer’s Disease while President and Reliable Sources host Brian Stelter’s fear-mongering got smashed to piece by conservative Ben Ferguson.


Just because liberals devote a massive amount of attention to the current POTUS doesn’t mean that they neglect his VPOTUS. In a Tuesday Nation piece, Walsh disclosed, “You probably have these debates with your friends, too: Do we want Donald Trump to resign, or be impeached, which would leave us with Vice President Mike Pence in charge?...Would the low-charisma Pence, who looks like a B-movie producer’s idea of a president, be easier to defeat [in 2020], especially given the GOP fratricide that would commence with Trump’s departure, however it came about?”


ESPN isn’t really a sports channel anymore, according to MRC’s Vice President of Business and Culture Dan Gainor.

ESPN has “shifted from sports to become the Extra Stupid Progressive Network,” Gainor said. He told Intelligence Report anchor Trish Regan that the sports network “does not live in the real world.”

 

On Wednesday, Hillary Clinton decided to pass along exclusive excerpts of her new memoir to her pals at MSNBC. Predictably, after playing long clips of the audio version of What Happened, the cast of Morning Joe gushed over Clinton’s “very powerful” narrative and were amazed by her supposed “self-reflection.” In reality, the partisan screed was more about self-pity and sniping at Donald Trump.


Wednesday morning at 12:05 a.m. Eastern Time (9:05 p.m. Tuesday Phoenix time), Reuters tweeted a photo with the following description: "Pro-Trump supporters face off with peace activists during protests outside a Trump rally in Phoenix." The photo by the wire service's Sandy Huffaker also appears in a photo montage at the UK Guardian with the caption "Pro-Trump supporters face off with peace activists."


Seeming to place the responsibility on Donald Trump, CBS This Morning on Wednesday pointedly noted that protesters in Phoenix didn’t become violent until after the President spoke. Reporting from the scene, journalist Carter Evans observed, “This is where thousands of protesters and Trump supporters were gathered before the rally. They were very vocal, but largely peaceful.”


It’s the creme de la creme of the famous activist dream. To run for public office (and theoretically, to win) would give any budding wannabe a certain amount of public validation. So it should come as no surprise that actress Shailene Woodley told the New York Times that she wouldn’t “rule out” the thought of “maybe I’ll run for Congress in a couple of years.”


New York Times reporter Simon Romero covered the violent aftermath of Tuesday night's Trump rally, as left-wing protesters, many violent, faced off with Trump fans: “Trump Rally in Phoenix Touches Nerves in City As Opposing Sides Meet.” Besides seeming to blame Trump’s “divisive” speech for hot tempers (including assaults on police officers), Romero suggested the police were at fault.


After accusing Trump-supporters of wanting to hurt reporters, ABC went on to claim that Trump hated the media because he hates the truth, on Wednesday’s Good Morning America. Not only that, ABC political analyst Matthew Dowd stated, but Trump hates that that the Constitution protects freedom of the press.


Media Research Center President Brent Bozell on Wednesday mocked ESPN for its latest outburst of politically correct craziness. Appearing on the Fox Business Network, he derided the removal of an Asian broadcaster because he has the name Robert Lee, the same as the Confederate general. Bozell sarcastically suggested, “If ESPN is going to take that position they don't go far enough. They need to ban the University of Virginia from their football teams altogether.”