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Appearing as a guest on Monday's New Day, liberal CNN political commentator Symone Sanders not only repeatedly smeared White House advisors Steve Bannon and Sebastian Gorka as "white supremacist sympathizers," but she even deceptively claimed that Gorka had characterized "brown people" as a problem.

 


CNN abruptly announced on Thursday that it was dumping conservative Jeffrey Lord because he had used the words “Sieg Heil” in a tweet. A spokesman declared “Nazi salutes are indefensible....Jeffrey Lord is no longer with the network.” The New York Times headline read “Jeffrey Lord, Trump Defender on CNN, Is Fired for Using Nazi Slogan.” Three points need to be made, and this is first: This is a false accusation. Firing Lord on a hate-speech premise is flirting with slander.


After all three broadcast networks spent Sunday blaming President Trump for the deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia over the weekend, in an exclusive interview with NBC News aired on Monday’s Today show, Vice President Mike Pence took the liberal media to task for its biased coverage.


Continuing to show her childish behavior and pivot toward becoming a full-blown Democrat, CNN political commentator Ana Navarro declared on Monday morning’s CNN Newsroom that President Trump’s response to Charlottesville’s neo-Nazi violence proved he’s a spineless “coward” and “nincompoop” who’s “unfit to be human.”


If both the Daily Beast and Fox News are disturbed by Chelsea Handler’s tweets, she must be doing Twitter wrong. While the rest of the media melted down over the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, on August 11. Chelsea Handler wrote, “To all the generals surrounding our idiot-in-chief...the longer U wait to remove him, the longer UR name will appear negatively in history.”

 


Everyone expected the liberal media to hound President Trump to denounce his "base" of white supremacists and neo-Nazis specifically after the vehicular homicide in Charlottesville on Saturday, and once other Republicans showed how it was done, the media pressure intensified. But it takes a special kind of liberal-media jerk to denounce the actual Republican Nazi-denouncers as just positioning for the 2020 campaign. Meet New York Times reporter Eric Lipton.


The panel of Morning Joe erupted with outrage Monday morning over President Trump’s response to the Charlottesville rally. Willie Geist noted a “pattern” being at work, stating, “There's always this beat, this pause, this wink and he did it again on Saturday where it happened on many sides.” New York Times reporter Yamiche Alcindor agreed as she noted her own experiences in encountering pro-Trump white nationalists at the 2016 RNC convention. The criticism crescendoed, however, with Donny Deutsch, who denounced Trump as a “pathetic, sniveling man” before screaming, “No, he is a racist. He is a racist! Can we just say it once and for all?”   


Illegal immigrants (or rather, “undocumented immigrants”) remain safe under the rhetorical protection of the New York Times, if not the legal protection of American law. The top of Sunday’s Times front page featured a 3,000-word sympathetic tale, complete with huge photos, of an illegal immigrant family in Hampton, Iowa, choosing to self-deport after the husband was arrested. Reporter Jack Healy unfolded his long tale under the headline “Loving and Leaving America -- Stay, Hide, ‘Self-Deport’? Facing Hard Choices in the Heartland.”


Neo-nazis are bad. Trump is also bad. Therefore, Trump and neo-nazis must go together. This is the kind of logic liberal celebrities have been employing over the past two days. On August 13, comedian Michael Ian Black (who plays President George H.W. Bush on Wet Hot American Summer) joined the extremely vocal mob of famous has-beens on Twitter and blamed Trump for the “Unite the Right” march in Charlottesville, Virginia.

 


New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman advised the Democrats to embrace some of Donald Trump's beliefs, because "Some things are true even if Donald Trump believes them!" If they hope to attract Trump voters in the midterms they will have to make some moves toward the president. But if you look at his list, you'll notice the TV news elite doesn't want to acknowledge any truth on Trump's "gut issues." 


In the August 13 episode of Comedy Central’s Legends of Chamberlain Heights, the absurdity of mandatory niceness to gays in order to support their social agenda is mocked and explained. It’s Homecoming Weekend at Duncan High and the Legends see a chance to get dates with popular girls.


On Saturday afternoon, an act of racist terrorism was committed in Charlottesville, Virginia. Among those responsible, according to Esquire’s Charles Pierce, were Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush. “Every Republican who ever played footsie with the militias out west owns this bloodshed,” disgorged Pierce in a Sunday post. “Every Republican president -- actually, there's only one -- who began a campaign in Philadelphia, Mississippi, to talk about states rights...owns this bloodshed…Every Republican politician who followed the late Lee Atwater into the woods in search of poisoned treasure owns this bloodshed…Every conservative journalist who saw this happening and who encouraged it, or ignored it, or pretended that it wasn't happening, owns this bloodshed.”


On Thursday, a federal court judge in New York made what Eriq Gardner at the Hollywood Reporter called an "unusual move" in Sarah Palin's libel lawsuit against the New York Times. It is indeed extraordinarily unusual, and would appear not to bode well for the Times — which likely explains why the paper's colleagues in the establishment press are, for the most part, either not reporting it at all or inadequately reporting it.


When Islamic extremists attack a military awards ceremony on a primetime television show, you can bet that within a few episodes it will be made clear that the suicide-vested attackers shouting “Allahu Akbar” will be absolved. The terrorism was just an act, theater for the witnesses and victims meant to distract the populace from the real attackers. In Shooter, the real perpetrator is our very own government—and possibly the United Nations.


During Sunday's AM Joy on MSNBC, during discussions of the white racist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, White House advisors were repeatedly referred to by panel members as "Nazis" or "white supremacists." And in one segment, as the group fretted over Colin Kaepernick's outcast status in the NFL, ESPN columnist William C. Rhoden oddly claimed that "a lot of players" in both the NFL and Major League Baseball "have kind of support from these people -- the Nazis or white supremacists," as host Joy Reid responded in agreement.