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Being in jail must be really empowering. At least, actor James Cromwell, best known for his role in Babe, has been inspired to be the messenger for political activism in Hollywood after his 7-day stint in prison. (Spoiler alert: He wants there to be more activism).  

The actor gave an 8-minute speech to the Daily Mail and gave his thoughts on prison, justice, climate change, and the President of the United States. He spoke out to his own Hollywood community, “This community’s got to get more political. Our survival as an industry … is at stake.”

 


New York Times labor reporter Noam Scheiber, former editor for the liberal New Republic magazine, sounded rather bitter about another autoworker union setback in the South, under the loaded headline “U.A.W. Accuses Nissan of ‘Scare Tactics’ as Workers Reject Union Bid." He also played the race card in an article before the vote. In Times-world, if unions lose, something must be fishy.


I spent much of my Friday binge-watching Comrade Detective, a show that resists genre, but is perfect in its oddity. Released on August 3, Amazon bills the show as a Romanian detective show from the 1980s that was actually thinly disguised anti-capitalist propaganda. They then brought in such talent as Channing Tatum and Joseph Gordon-Levitt to dub over the original Romanian dialogue. In reality, this is a new show created to make fun of these old propaganda pieces, and mocks their love of communism and fear of the capitalist west. Yes, it was filmed in Romania with Romanian actors, but specifically for this concept. It's weird, and it completely works.


The most obnoxious segment of Netflix’s Chelsea airing on August 4th involved two liberal California Democrats and the glimpse they give into the minds of the far left in the early days of the Trump presidency.


The August 6 episode of Ballers, "In the Teeth," had a couple of great moments for the left-wing viewers as one athlete provided a cliché soundbite about the right trying to keep people of color from succeeding, and another character was called out by the feminist PC police for pointing out that a woman with the NFL who has never played professional football doesn't know what it's like to play professional football.


Still unsigned football free agent, Colin Kaepernick has a new apologist -- a law professor and Islamaphobia researcher. One of the most outlandish and indefensible attacks on the NFL comes in an error-filled diatribe by Khaled Beydoun, a law professor at the Universit of Detroit Mercy and also a senior affiliated faculty with the University of California-Berkeley Islmaophobia Research and Documentation Project.


One way to know a reporter's mind is located out in the radical-left boondocks is to proclaim that somehow Time magazine belongs on the right wing. On Saturday, Emma Graham-Harrison of the British newspaper The Guardian penned a jaw-dropping first paragraph about a new sex-discrimination lawsuit against Time: "The co-founder of the Women’s Equality party, Catherine Mayer, is suing her former employer, Time magazine, for gender and age discrimination, making the weekly favoured by President Donald Trump the latest major media company to be embroiled in accusations of institutional sexism."


The New York Times special Education section Sunday soft-pedaled the authoritarian left-wing movements afoot on many college campuses, including the violence black-bloc "anti-fascist" movement Antifa. First, Laura Pappano’s solid if slightly muddled piece on left-wing campus intolerance of dissenting views appeared under a euphemistic headline: “Where ‘Everything Is Under Attack’ -- Students are demanding more control over faculty, curriculums and their own identities.” Next, the violent “anti-fascist” movement Antifa got some sympathetic coverage.


Washington Post columnist Dana Milbank's vicious, mean-spirited attacks on Donald Trump, Republicans, and conservatives have become so predictable and trite that they're barely worthy of attention, no matter how shrill his rhetoric. The unhinged Milbank is of course entitled to his opinions, but in his latest column on Friday, he tried to promote an obvious falsehood as an indisputable fact, claiming in his column's headline that "There’s no such thing as a Trump Democrat."


The theme of NBC’s Meet the Press on Sunday was all about complaining how “broken” U.S. politics have become under President Trump. According to the stacked anti-Trump panel, most of the blame belongs to the “anti-intellectual” attitude of “the extreme of the right-wing.” In the mix, Hillary Clinton super-fan Andrea Mitchell couldn’t help but smear the Republicans who were critical of the failed Democratic nominee. Yet she found herself thanking Republican Senator Jeff Flake for standing up to those who chanted “lock her up.”


On Sunday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, as Al Sharpton presided over a discussion of an upcoming march to commemorate Martin Luther King Jr.'s role in the Civil Rights Movement, the MSNBC host fretted that President Donald Trump is "killing the dream" after one of the guests claimed that MLK Jr.'s "dream" had become a "nightmare" for many.

 


On Wednesday, two GOP Senators, with help from the White House, rolled out a new legal immigration proposal that put emphasis on certain merits to receive a green card. And as the Media Research Center reported later that night, the liberal media were up in arms. But CNN’s Fareed Zakaria took a different approach during his show Global Public Square on Sunday. According to him, the Democrats were the ones “out of touch” with the feelings of many Americans.


The front page of the Saturday Metro section of The Washington Post offered breaking news on Christian attitudes. “Christians are far more likely than non-Christians to blame poverty on a lack of effort, a poll found.”

This poll from the Post and the Kaiser Family Foundation is three months old, taken from April 13 to May 1. This is not just a poll question; it’s begging for overgeneralization, with “the poor are mostly lazy” being judged by liberals as akin to “Muslims are mostly terrorists” or “Catholic priests are mostly child abusers.”


Bari Weiss is a staff editor in the opinion section at the New York Times. Like many women, she was initially enthused by the Women's March movement which began after President Donald Trump's inauguration. Since then she has, for many good reasons, become disillusioned. She detailed that disillusionment in a Tuesday op-ed which clearly runs against the grain at the Times, and received predictable, name-calling blowback from a Women's March leader who pretended that they and their movement are non-violent. It isn't, and they aren't.


Forget all your favorite children’s books. They may be deeply racist. In the August 7 Time came an article headlined “The hidden (and not-so-hidden) racism in kids’ lit.”