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NPR has a series called "Off Script," where regular voters question the presidential candidates. On Wednesday's Morning Edition, they aired audio of an El Paso school teacher suggesting to Beto O' Rourke that his proposal to take away "assault weapons" from Americans through a "mandatory buyback" program won't pass constitutional muster, and will help the Republicans underline how Democrats oppose the Second Amendment. 



In the past couple of weeks, New York Times reporters Michael Shear and Julie Hirschfeld Davis have made TV appearances to promote their book Border Wars: Inside Trump's Assault on Immigration. In appearances on CNN and MSNBC, anchors have underlined revelations that President Trump suggested the extreme step of government agents shooting immigrants in the legs -- often leaving out the notion that it would be in response to immigrants throwing large rocks...and of course, often leaving out the word "illegal" to characterize the immigrants. 



Washington Post media columnist Margaret Sullivan has spent the Trump era insisting on how Donald Trump is at odds with what she calls the "reality-based press." But what about when the facts line up against candidates Margaret likes? Well, then facts are no longer fair. "Alternative facts" are produced. 



Not surprisingly, the panel on Friday’s edition of Real Time weighed in on the impeachment inquiry that has sucked up all of the oxygen on Capitol Hill. Host Bill Maher suggested that Republicans’ behavior throughout the impeachment inquiry indicates that they “don’t believe in democracy anymore.” In addition, the panel took aim at Fox News; slamming the primetime hosts as “a**-lickers” and accusing the network of spinning out “a totally different version of reality.”



Newsweek reporter Rosie McCall offered a conspiracy theory as to how a 16-year-old environmental activist somehow failed to win the Nobel Peace Prize this year: “Greta Thunberg Snubbed for Nobel Peace Prize by Committee Run by Norway, One of the World's Biggest Oil and Natural Gas Exporters.” This new theory comes courtesy of a magazine fresh off breaking the news that opening tanning salons in urban neighborhoods were a plot to give gay men skin cancer, or something: "for many, Norway's decision to give the award to a climate activist would have been an important symbolic gesture."



One of the more distasteful habits of liberal journalists has always been the tendency to flatter and fawn over brutal dictators. Reporters, who are supposed to speak truth to power, often fail when it comes to charismatic communists. That’s exactly what happened when ABC's Barbara Walters interviewed Fidel Castro 17 years ago, Friday, on October 11, 2002.



NPR's longtime loathing of Fox News approached Maximum Shamelessness on Friday night when NPR anchor Ari Shapiro suggested that Shepard Smith abruptly leaving Fox looked like "a purge based on purity." As if NPR has a pile of conservatives on staff for balance? In 2010, NPR fired Juan Williams for an appearance on Fox where he admitted he gets nervous when people wear Muslim garb on airplanes.



ABC sitcom American Housewife jumped on the radical environmentalist bandwagon this week with Friday's episode “Bigger Kids, Bigger Problems.”



Despite the fact that the Jeffrey Zucker-led CNN has created a cottage industry out of town halls involving presidential candidates and/or their liberal causes, CNN showed very little interest in recapping their four-and-a-half-hour, horrendously-rated Thursday night LGBTQ town hall with nine 2020 Democratic presidential candidates. Between midnight and 7:30 p.m. Eastern Friday (so 21 and a half hours total), CNN shows spent just under 25 minutes (24 minutes and 47 seconds) on a town hall that featured a slew of alienating takes.



Thursday night, Washington Examiner’s Rob Crilly, Steven Nelson, and David Drucker reported that alleged CIA whistleblower at the center of the congressional inquiry seeking to impeach and remove President Donald Trump “had a ‘professional’ tie” to “Joe Biden, according to intelligence officers and former White House officials.” But on the Friday morning and evening flagship broadcast network newscasts, this update was ignored. 



If you thought that leftist cancel culture couldn't get any more absurd, well, it just did. SpongeBob Squarepants, the popular television cartoon, has been accused of cultural appropriation by a university professor.



New York Times political reporter Thomas Kaplan performed impressive damage control on behalf of rising Democratic candidate Elizabeth Warren on Wednesday. But he really raised his game in his Friday “news analysis” entitled, “As Warren Rises, Republicans Probe Her Biography for Points of Attack,” which was even more shameless in its feminist favoritism toward Warren. Kaplan hurled the “sexism” card at the GOP for daring to show Warren lied about the circumstances of her leaving a teaching position in 1971.The text box: “Looking to a tactic that is often used against women.”



The ongoing battle between New York Times columnist Bret Stephens and George Washington University media professor Dave Karpf took another bizarre turn on Thursday, when Stephens pulled out of a scheduled debate with Karpf because the clash would not be closed to the public. Intended as the end of a feud between the two men that began back in August -- when the professor compared the columnist to a “bedbug” in a post on Twitter -- the event was slated to take place on October 28 in Washington, D.C., until Stephens pulled out.



Given that half of the country thinks President Trump committed an act so egregious it warrants his impeachment, while the other half thinks he is the victim of the largest witch-hunt in modern history, it would be nice if there was an election that could sort this out.  Fortunately, there is an election in 13 months that will allow the voters to decide what they think of President Trump, Joe Biden, and Ukraine, but MSNBC Live guest host Yasmin Vossoughian wondered on Friday what it would mean for democracy if voters made the wrong decision.



On Thursday, the ladies of The View weighed in on Hollywood’s reaction to liberal comedian Ellen DeGeneres and former President George W. Bush sitting next to each other at a Dallas Cowboys game. While some of the co-hosts acknowledged that they thought it was important to have friends on both sides of the political aisle, co-host Sunny Hostin understood why some liberal celebrities were “put off” by a liberal lesbian having a friendship with a Republican President who dared to support traditional marriage.