CNN's Amanpour Invokes Nazi Germany in Loss for French 'Extreme Far Right' Le Pen

On Monday's New Day, as CNN's Christiane Amanpour informed viewers of the French presidential election results, she twice tagged defeated conservative candidate Marine Le Pen as "extreme" and "far right," and also charged that she campaigned on "fear and hatred and loathing."

She also made sure to bring up the anniversary of Europe's victory over Nazi Germany, and relayed to viewers that the government of Germany -- "of all places" -- is concerned that Le Pen could be elected next time if Emmanuel Macron fails as president. Amanpour: "Now, today is V-E Day, which is obviously the celebration of European victory against the Nazi war machine. It comes one day after the extreme far right candidate herself was defeated."

At 6:55 ET, after casting the election results as a victory for the "center" in France, Amanpour went on to relay that there was celebration in other parts of Europe:

But it also says that the center held here in France. And Europe is celebrating because this is a huge, important country -- the second biggest economy in Europe and obviously the sixth biggest economy in the world. And Europe believes that this is going to save the European Union.

She then brought up Nazi Germany and called Le Pen an "extreme far right candidate herself" as she added:

Now, today is V-E Day, which is obviously the celebration of European victory against the Nazi war machine. It comes one day after the extreme far right candidate herself was defeated. And Macron came out publicly with the current president,

A bit later, co-host Alisyn Camerota asked about the issue of terrorism in France, leading Amanpour to take aim at Le Pen again:

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Well, here's the thing. Marine Le Pen tried to run on a project of fear and hatred and loathing and inward-looking, you know, "batten down the hatches." The French didn't buy it in the end.

She then seemed to fret that there were as many as 11 million people who voted for "far-right extremist" Le Pen -- who was defeated by a 2-1 vote -- as the CNN correspondent added:

But let's not forget that there was a good number of people who abstained from this round, and a good number of people who spoiled their ballots, and there were 11 million people nearly who voted for Marine Le Pen, the far-right extremist candidate. Therefore, it means that there are still issues at play that need to be dealt with, and that Macron knows that he's -- he will, you know, sink or swim on being able to deliver. 

Amanpour recalled that the German government was worried about a potential Le Pen win in the future:

And even the Europeans know. The German foreign minister basically congratulated him and said, "If Macron cannot deliver the reforms, then in five years at the end of his term, he said Mrs. Le Pen could be the next president of France. Therefore, we in Europe," he said, "have to help him. Therefore, we must stop this just sort of march towards austerity, and we have to be able to give some help to our, you know, our partner in Europe to be able to deliver these reforms."

Presumably referring to Gemany's Nazi history, she added: "So that's a big deal coming from Germany of all places."

At this point, Amanpour seemed to lose her train of thought and abruptly ended her analysis without viewers getting to find out what additional liberal bias might have been on her mind that she didn't let out: "And, you know, there's a -- yeah."

Below is a transcript of relevant portions of the Monday, May 8, New Day on CNN:

6:55 a.m. ET

CHRISTIANE AMANPOUR: But it also says that the center held here in France. And Europe is celebrating because this is a huge, important country -- the second biggest economy in Europe and obviously the sixth biggest economy in the world. And Europe believes that this is going to save the European Union.

Now, today is V-E Day, which is obviously the celebration of European victory against the Nazi war machine. It comes one day after the extreme far right candidate herself was defeated. And Macron came out publicly with the current president, Francois Hollande, to pay tribute, lay a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and meet with veterans.

(...)

ALISYN CAMEROTA: They still have, as you just pointed out, all these challenges. I mean, certainly immigration, They've been plagued by, as we know, horrific terror attacks. Where does he start on those?

AMANPOUR: Well, here's the thing. Marine Le Pen tried to run on a project of fear and hatred and loathing and inward-looking, you know, "batten down the hatches." The French didn't buy it in the end. But let's not forget that there was a good number of people who abstained from this round, and a good number of people who spoiled their ballots, and there were 11 million people nearly who voted for Marine Le Pen, the far-right extremist candidate. Therefore, it means that there are still issues at play that need to be dealt with, and that Macron knows that he's -- he will, you know, sink or swim on being able to deliver. 

And even the Europeans know. The German foreign minister basically congratulated him and said, "If Macron cannot deliver the reforms, then in five years at the end of his term, he said Mrs. Le Pen could be the next president of France. Therefore, we in Europe," he said, "have to help him. Therefore, we must stop this just sort of march towards austerity, and we have to be able to give some help to our, you know, our partner in Europe to be able to deliver these reforms." So that's a big deal coming from Germany of all places. And, you know, there's a, yeah.

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