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President Donald Trump suggested at his August 15 press conference that after you start taking down Robert E. Lee statues that it could lead to the same fate for George Washington or Thomas Jefferson statues because they owned slaves. The response from much of the mainstream media was quick. They utterly mocked the notion that such an outcome could take place. An example of the MSM reaction came from the Associated Press via the PBS website. 


The New York Times' Gardiner Harris came up with a Trump-centric spin on an annual report about religious persecution worldwide, which this year focused on the terrorists of ISIS, in his Wednesday report “Islamic State Criticized As Persecutor In U.S. Report.” The text box: “Singling out ISIS in a study of threats to religious freedom.” Harris had some other threats in mind: The Trump administration, for one, both for attacks on Muslims and for failing to bring more of them in as refugees.


The media don’t just make the news, they frame it. Journalists did it this week, pushing business CEOs to quit President Donald Trump’s American Manufacturing Council. After one CEO resigned in response to Trump’s comments on the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, the media urged others to follow. The fallout resulted in Trump shutting down the group entirely.

Merck CEO Ken Frazier decided to leave the council after Trump’s comments on violence between white supremacists and counter protesters which included Antifa. Antifa are “anti-fascists” who show up to protest hateful speech and try to shut it down and have demonstrated willingness to use violence to accomplish those goals, according to CNN.


During MSNBC’s 1 p.m. ET hour on Wednesday, NBC News correspondent Morgan Radford turned to the one regime on earth most like the Nazis in order lecture the United States on race relations. The reporter actually cited a tweet from Iran’s brutal anti-Semitic dictator Ali Khamenei as an example of “global criticism” of President Trump’s reaction to Charlottesville.


Appearing as a guest on Wednesday's CNN Newsroom, CNN senior political reporter Nia-Malika Henderson claimed that the Republican party has been "playing the race card" for "many decades" as she commented on Republican reaction to President Donald Trump's recent comments in which he seemed to give cover to white racist rally participants in Charlottesville.

 


Aborting unborn babies with Down syndrome “hearkens back to neo-Nazi Germany,” according to Sarah Palin. On Tuesday, Fox anchor Martha MacCallum invited former Alaska governor and GOP vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin on her show, The Story, to discuss a CBS report claiming that Down syndrome is “disappearing” in Iceland. CBS got it wrong: rather than the genetic disorder “disappearing,” unborn babies with Down syndrome are “disappearing” – via abortion.


For anyone who thinks CNN is dedicated to bringing the American people together, you’re sadly mistaken. Case in point two examples from CNN International on early Tuesday and Wednesday mornings where guest Segun Oduolowu declared the GOP to be neo-Nazis while leaders like Paul Ryan and Mitch McConnell are “old slave owners” who ignored lynchings.


While CNN is gung-ho in its relentless coverage and criticism of Tuesday’s press conference, the network’s apparently not as interested in correcting its liberal guests less than accurate characterizations of violent left-wing groups.

 

Money walks, talks, and screams. At a protest, naturally, it should scream louder. So it should come as no surprise that some of Donald Trump’s famous (and wealthy) opponents went on a loud chanting protest in front of the Trump Tower on August 15, led by everyone’s favorite wealthy protester, director Michael Moore.

 


Following President Trump’s controversial news conference on Tuesday regarding the deadly Charlottesville violence perpetrated by white supremacists, on MSNBC on Wednesday, anchor Stephanie Ruhle and political contributor Steve Schmidt hurled a nasty smear against Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao, who was present at the event for an announcement about the nation’s infrastructure. 


The Associated Press vice president for standards announced that they will try to avoid using the term “alt-right” to describe neo-Nazis and white supremacists, since it "may exist primarily as a public relations device." To which many conservatives will say: Good, we’ve never wanted to be associated with those noxious beliefs. The AP wasn't that sensitive to positive sounds of the self-described "Antifa" or "anti-fascist" movement....because they can barely report that such groups exist.


According to CNN anchor Don Lemon, just working for Donald Trump makes you “complicit” in his racism. That goes for supporters as well. Appearing on New Day, Wednesday, he blasted anyone connected to the President: “Anyone who is in that White House and who is supporting him is complicit in their racism as well.” 


Liam Stack pulled himself off his anti-Trump Twitter feed long enough to file “Alt-Right, Alt-Left, Antifa, Cuck: A Brief Glossary of Extremist Terminology” for Wednesday’s New York Times, while his colleague Linda Qiu assured us that “anti-fascist” Antifa, the bat-wielding, window-smashing black bloc, are not actually domestic terrorists. Both stories soft-pedaled the violence emanating from Antifa.


A recent New York Times story could be summed up in a single common-sense statement: People who dislike regulation support deregulation. But instead, The Times devoted 3,300 words to portraying deregulation as a special deal between a single company and the FCC. Because that company is Sinclair, which is a media company with “conservative” leanings.


Dear liberals: if Donald Trump uses a word you aren’t familiar with, that doesn’t mean it’s a fake word. After the President mentioned the alt-left yesterday in a press conference, the New York Times ran a story that claimed, “Researchers who study extremist groups in the United States say there is no such thing as the “alt-left.”