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The Washington Post is aghast. Here's the headline: "The Daily 202: Trump may hire multiple cable news personalities as part of shake-up." The story by James Hohmann says this in part: "THE BIG IDEA: Donald Trump’s reality television presidency may be getting more star power for season two." 

Trump detractor and former ESPN SportsCenter anchor Jemele Hill, who called the president and his supporters "white supremacists" last fall, is now condemning an NFL team owner who raised money for the commander in chief. Now a sports writer for ESPN's The Undefeated blog, Hill targeted Tampa Bay Bucs' owner Ed Glazer for attempting to help Trump's re-election campaign raise $5 million.

And then there’s A Wrinkle in Time.The long-awaited adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s beloved book got all the bells and whistles Disney could muster. But A Wrinkle in Time’s use of religious themes made it both controversial and one of the most thought-provoking children’s stories in modern fiction. It appears that change wasn’t an accident.

Quick! Somebody pass the smelling salts to CNN's Presidential Historian Douglas Brinkley.

He went full blown hysterical on CNN's Tonight on Friday over the news about the firing of former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe. He tossed out words like "Friday night slaughter" and "paranoid" to describe President Donald Trump and he was only getting warmed up. He acted as if the firing was strictly political and unjustified. However, as we shall later hear from reknowned legal scholar Jonathan Turley, the firing was not only justified but probably mandatory.

After the Gulf War in 1991, Time magazine was worried about an outbreak of patriotism. It must be stopped before it “bursts the bounds of reason” and “passes into jingoism.” Another example from the This Week in Media Bias History archives: Dan Rather, he’s not subtle. The now-disgraced CBS Evening News anchor in 1995 described the 1994 GOP congressional class as aiming to “demolish” programs “helping children and the poor.”

On the March 10 midnight edition of Fox News @Night, Juan Williams disingenuously made three attempts to create a false equivalence between Congressional Black Caucus leaders' political and physical embraces of National of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan and Donald Trump's non-existent relationship with the KKK. Host Shannon Bream and the Daily Caller's Vince Coglianese weren't having any of it, but Williams wouldn't let go.

The leftist-organized wave of school walkouts to protest “gun violence” on March 14 is a classic example study in the way protests are categorized by our news and entertainment media. Liberal protests are always authentic, newsworthy, and even apolitical. Conservative protests are phony, boring, and yet extreme.

On Friday's PBS NewsHour, David Brooks, who is somehow described as the Republican or conservative half of the pundit panel, dismissed the ascent of men liked by the conservative movement as the worst kind of public servants, the C or D level of Republican aides, because they're too ideological. Larry Kudlow is just the "worst," and John Bolton is "anything but neutral on anything." 

On March 10, "authorities say," a 22 year-old man in South Carolina killed "his grandparents, an aunt and a cousin." It appears that only the Associated Press has given attention to this story. By contrast, recent "mass killings" involving fewer victims received widespread national coverage. Why is that? The answer appears to be that the South Carolina attacker didn't use a gun.

On Friday night, ABC’s World News Tonight and NBC Nightly News showed zero interest in informing viewers about a new but sad twist involving the death of Kate Steinle as the illegal immigrant who was acquitted last year of her murder filed a lawsuit against the federal government. In contrast, the CBS Evening News gave this lawsuit by illegal immigrant Jose Inez Garcia Zarate its due diligence with two teases and a full segment. 

Ending two years as the public editor at ESPN, Jim Brady closed out his association with the Worldwide Leader in (Liberal) Sports with a review of the network's recent highs and lows. Brady bragged up the network, but did not spare it from criticism and declared its future has never been so uncertain.


One could say that it was late on a Friday afternoon, but then again, this is MSNBC’s Deadline: White House and liberal Republicans offering fear-mongering prognostications are nothing new. On the March 16 edition, host Nicolle Wallace led a band of MSNBC Republicans as each offered assessments ranging from bragging about smearing Sarah Palin to arguing the President’s tariffs will cause a depression to ironically complaining about having to discuss porn. 

Which is more harmful: Being given a friendly (but arguably distasteful and ill-timed) greeting or being knocked to the ground? The answer is obvious to anybody with common sense but, in the mainstream media, the former is currently being reported on with great outrage while the latter is ignored. Both events happened on Thursday during and just after Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke testified before a congressional committee.

Shepard Smith, a long-time anchor for the Fox News Channel, signed a new multi-year contract on Thursday, when he stated during an interview with Joe Concha, a media reporter for The Hill political website, that opinion programming on his network doesn't “really have rules” and exists “strictly to be entertaining.”

While marking the death of longtime New York Congresswoman Louise Slaughter on Friday, MSNBC anchor Andrea Mitchell shared her favorite memory of the Democratic lawmaker – when Slaughter and several other liberal House members attempted to derail the 1991 confirmation hearing of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.