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A spate of liberal magazines unleashed their fury at Donald Trump’s post-Charlottesville remarks with artistic covers mocking Trump with Ku Klux Klan hoods and Nazi salutes. On Tuesday, The Washington Post celebrated the liberal trend – and never, ever called it liberal. They were merely “internationally prominent.” The headline in bold, large type was a quote: “We can’t let the images be too timid,” and the subtitle was “Magazines use provocative imagery after Trump’s comments about participants in the Charlottesville confrontations.”


President Trump said a lot of things in the wake of the Charlottesville violence, many of them unhelpful. But he got one big thing unequivocally correct when he said of the Maoist statue topplers: “So, this week it’s Robert E. Lee, I noticed that Stonewall Jackson is coming down. I wonder,” Trump asked, “is it George Washington next week? And is it Thomas Jefferson the week after? You know, you really do have to ask yourself, where does it stop?”


The term “genocide” conjures images of World War II concentration camps, Soviet Gulags, gulags, the violence and rioting in 1994 Rwanda or the ISIS purging of Syrian and Iraqi Christians.

But Salon contributors Max Pensky and Nadia Rubaii believe “genocidal violence can happen in the U.S. It has happened.” So what should individuals do? Look to the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) for guidance, of course!

 


CNN’s Chris Cuomo on Tuesday discovered a new phrase that he could employ in deriding Donald Trump. The New Day anchor used it again and again, repeatedly wondering if the President is a “moral agent.” Talking about the President’s speech on Afghanistan, the journalist lectured, “Moral agency is about what comes out of you at your core. Okay? It doesn't matter how you say it.” Cuomo hinted that Trump’s well-received speech would soon be contradicted. 


In an exclusive interview with Vice President Mike Pence on Tuesday’s NBC Today, co-host Matt Lauer noted that President Trump was “getting applause from a lot of people” for his address to the nation on Afghanistan, but then focused entirely on criticism of the newly announced war strategy.  
 


A few days before Steve Bannon left the Trump White House, President Trump noted that Bannon had not signed on until “very late" in the 2016 campaign. Still, much like a ballplayer acquired just prior to the trading deadline who puts his team over the top, Bannon made a crucial contribution to Trump’s win, suggests New York’s Jonathan Chait. Bannon realized well before he joined the Trump campaign that if Hillary-bashing had a respectable face, it could find a far larger and more persuadable audience than the old-school wacky conspiratorial stuff did.


Giving $1 million to the conservative-bashing Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) wasn’t enough for Apple. It is matching donations by its employees and using iTunes to encourage users to donate even more to the SPLC, which regularly depicts mainstream conservative organizations as “hate groups.”


All eyes were on President Trump Monday night as he addressed the nation about the country’s future actions in regard to the war in Afghanistan. And without giving too many details, the President declared that there would be some form of troop increase but noted that there were conditions to our aid and limits to the costs we were willing to bear. But that wasn’t enough for MSNBC’s Lawrence O’Donnell, who bemoaned Trump’s address and eagerly awaited White House leaks of the details.


On Monday night, the “big three” networks of ABC, CBS, and NBC each broke in with special reports for President Trump’s speech announcing his Afghanistan strategy and, in the course of the post-speech analyses, ABC and NBC lobbed cold water on the plans seeing as how low Trump’s approval ratings have been.


ABC, CBS, and NBC's evening newscasts on Monday all failed to cover the thwarted bombing of a Confederate monument in Houston, Texas. The Big Three networks led and concluded each program with full reports on the solar eclipse that crossed the United States, but didn't even set aside a news brief to the arrest of Andrew Cecil Schneck, who allegedly prepared explosives and tried to set them off near the Texas landmark.


Let’s offer some congratulations to AMC’s Preacher for giving me the fastest, most efficient subject for an article yet. The latest episode featured a subject so embarrassingly crass that I’m shocked I got through the entire episode without slamming my head against a wall. It only takes three simple words: Jesus having sex.


Over the course of last week, on NBC and MSNBC, host Chuck Todd gave a leg up to the violent Antifa movement by letting them defend their assaults on the police and innocent people not once, but twice. Todd’s interviews showed just how tolerant he was of those who use violence to shut down free speech. And while Todd was absent from MTP Daily on Monday, Katy Tur picked up his torch and proudly pushed back against the First Amendment’s acknowledgment of a person’s right to free speech.


Hours before President Trump’s Monday night speech announcing a U.S. troops surge in Afghanistan, MSNBC’s Hardball host Chris Matthews admitted that he’s a “dove” “already worried about tonight” because it’s a “pure” escalation by the military “establishment.” It’s worth noting that this represented an admirable consistency by Matthews, seeing as how he also criticized a troop surge by President Obama on December 1, 2009 (but more on that later).


During Monday morning’s edition of the Fox & Friends program on the Fox News Channel, co-host Ainsley Earhardt moderated a debate between two guests over whether Missouri State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal should step down after the Democratic official posted an online message that “I hope Trump is assassinated!”


New on August 21: CNN host Brian Stelter wondered if President Trump has an illness that makes him unfit for office: “Is the President of the United States a racist? Is he suffering from some kind of illness? Is he fit for office? And if he’s unfit, then what?”