To left-stream media in Missouri, free speech extends to inflammatory actions by athletes, but not to Republican politicians who comment on those activities.



Wonder of wonders, the normally staunch and reliable USA Today defenders of all things LGBT actually allowed an opinion piece by someone opposed to transgender athletes taking over women's sports. Anita Y. Milanovich, a constitutional attorney from Butte, Mont., says transgender athletes deserve compassion, but they don't have a right to transform women's sports.



Monday's signing of the California Fair Pay To Play Act into law is generating overwhelming support from the liberal sports media establishment. Starting in 2023, state universities in California will begin allowing college athletes to profit financially off their names, images and likeness ― opposing NCAA rules and setting up a major conflict with the association that governs U.S. college sports. The Nation magazine's progressive sports editor Dave Zirin took advantage of the controversy to bludgeon the Republican Party and by bringing "plantation politics" into the issue.



Casting aside interests in fair reporting this weekend, ESPN W's feature story on U.S. track and field star Gwen Berry attempts to justify her shameful protest at this summer's Pan American Games in Peru. Inspired by her war veteran father and the late Michael Brown of Ferguson fame, Berry won the hammer throw and raised her fist on the victory stand during the playing of the national anthem.



Tom Brady's six Super Bowl titles are not the reason for his popularity, says a University of Rhode Island associate professor. His popularity is really due to white rage and white supremacy, says English Professor Kyle Kusz in a badly over-reaching chapter in a new book published by Macmillan. Matthew Impelli reports the story in Newsweek.



Everlast, the company name you see so often on boxing gloves, is throwing a big punch for transgender athletes. The 119-year-old fitness company has selected trans boxer Patricio Manuel as the face of its "Be First" campaign. Everlast and Manuel are getting very good press from Newsweek, CNN and CNBC.



Rice University's intolerant marching band turned Saturday's halftime performance into a protest against visiting rival Baylor University's biblically based policy on sexuality. Rice's Marching Owl Band and fans displayed anti-Christian bigotry and showed their support for LGBTQ students at Baylor who recently tried and failed to start an LGBTQ club there.



On Monday, Washington Post sports writer Kevin Blackistone declared that public protests and lawsuits are winning the war on words against the continued use of Native American nicknames and mascots. But it depends on what the meaning of "winning" is: Polling by his own newspaper says that opponents of Redskins, Indians and other such nicknames are losing badly in the court of Native American opinion.



Just forget about all that bad blood between Colin Kaepernick and football fans. The former NFL quarterback is a money maker and the league that made a record $15 billion last season is embarrassing itself by blackballing Kaepernick, writes Terence Moore of Forbes magazine.



College wrestling season is only weeks away, and on Friday ESPN intentionally withheld key information in its celebration of the sport's first transgender wrestler. Non-binary ESPN W writer Katie Barnes featured Mackenzie "Mack" Beggs, the girl who wanted to compete in boys' wrestling, but was forced against her will to win her last 92 matches and two state high school girls' championships in Texas. Beggs is now a member of the Life University men's wrestling team that will start its season in a few weeks, and Barnes is riding this story for all it's worth, skipping over some crucial facts.



In a New York Magazine story claiming the age of athlete-politicians is coming soon, Will Leitch not only endorses the idea, but says a presidential ticket of LeBron James and Megan Rapinoe is already underway. Leitch is jazzed about the idea of athletes seeking public office — particularly those who are aligned with Democrat positions.



With the NFL's quarterback injury toll mounting, the volume on media calls for Colin Kaepernick's return to the NFL has risen to a deafening roar this week. His apologists always call for NFL teams to sign him when a quarterback goes down with an injury, but they've really ratcheted up the anger and intensity in the past couple days. USA Today's Nancy Armour and ESPN First Take's Max Kellerman top the list of shrill media bludgeoning the NFL for declining to restore the anti-American Kaepernick's pro football career.