By Jeffrey Lord | February 18, 2017 | 3:11 PM EST

You might call it The Media versus America. The President of the United States held a press conference on Thursday. On that, everyone agreed. But after that? Words like “unhinged” a particular favorite to describe the event. Here’s a sample of the headline reaction.The New York Times: An Aggrieved President Moves His Surrogates Aside, The Washington Post: Debrief: In an erratic performance, Trump shows his supporters who’s boss

 

By Christian Toto | February 18, 2017 | 12:30 PM EST

Don't expect the media to fact check any sketches painting President Trump in a bad light. Reporters are too busy cheering them on. Remember when Saturday Night Live mocked President Barack Obama? Yes, it did happen. Only the sketches aimed at the first black president were so rare they became a special event, like a holiday of sorts.

By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | February 18, 2017 | 7:30 AM EST

The New York Times was correct in 2011 when it proclaimed Saturday Night Live had no equal “when it comes to stamping a politician in the public consciousness.” Republican politicians like Sarah Palin were described as incapable of escaping the SNL treatment, and voters actually thought Palin uttered Tina Fey’s satirical line “I can see Russia from my house.” 

And yet, as the Times noted after three years in office, the NBC show couldn’t seem to locate a comedic angle on Barack Obama. He came into the White House as his impersonator Fred Armisen lamely spoke over a cool-jazz beat “I keep it cool -- I take my kids to school, I don’t lose my temper, it’s my only rule.” 

By Sarah Stites | February 17, 2017 | 4:56 PM EST

Hillary Clinton and Kate McKinnon are buds. On February 16, the former presidential candidate and her SNL double were spotted dining together in New York City, and the media had a field day. 

By Curtis Houck | February 13, 2017 | 12:59 PM EST

While the rest of the media were swooning over recent Saturday Night Live episodes almost exclusively devoted to anti-Trump sketches, Monday’s Good Morning America hit pause on that narrative, wondering if it’s “going too far” “pushing their politics” and “sacrificing some laughs along the way.”

By Tom Blumer | February 10, 2017 | 7:15 AM EST

What a difference a decade and a different political party make. In November 2005, Ohio GOP Congresswoman Jean Schmidt used the same "I'm just quoting someone else" technique to criticize a fellow Member which Massachusetts Democratic Senator Elizabeth Warren employed earlier this week to criticize since-confirmed Donald Trump Attorney General nominee Jeff Sessions. Schmidt was vilified to the point where she became the subject of ridicule on Saturday Night Live, while the intemperate Warren has become such an instant heroine on the left that she seems a likely favorably-portrayed subject of a skit this coming weekend, and a future candidate to host the show.

By Tim Graham | February 8, 2017 | 9:14 PM EST

The Washington Post is joining the liberal chorus of wishful thinkers that Melissa McCarthy’s Sean Spicer impression might damage Spicer and Donald Trump. Post reporter Elahe Izadi – who pitches herself as a stand-up comedian on the side – set out to promote anonymously-sourced stories of Trump unrest over the skit, and find leftist comedians who wished and hoped the NBC comedy show could convince President Trump to resign.

By Randy Hall | February 8, 2017 | 7:56 PM EST

After Sean Spicer's first few weeks on the job, he's become one of the targets for the “mainstream media” in their many attempts to smear and bring down the Republican occupant of the Oval Office. Along these lines, the press secretary was lampooned in a video posted on the GQ website Wednesday morning that contained 10 words he has mispronounced or misstated in his many hours at the podium, including such examples as “lasterday” instead of “yesterday” and “jordge” for “judge.”

By Curtis Houck | February 6, 2017 | 5:07 PM EST

Saturday Night Live couldn’t have drawn it up any better, folks. On Monday’s New Day, Reliable Sources host Brian Stelter and CNN media analyst Bill Carter sang the comedy show’s praises following Melissa McCarthy’s parody of Sean Spicer, spinning that the skit represents “a problem for the White House [and Spicer] going forward.”

By Nicholas Fondacaro | January 23, 2017 | 8:45 PM EST

Saturday Night Live writer Katie Rich found herself in hot water over the weekend after the 33-year-old thought it was humorous to bully 10-year-old Barron Trump, saying “Barron will be this country’s first homeschool shooter.” In response to Rich’s vile tweet, former first daughter Chelsea Clinton spoke up and defended the president’s son. ABC and NBC, of course, touted her defense Monday morning, but none of them mentioned the offense originated from an SNL writer, a show they love to quote. 

By Nicholas Fondacaro | January 15, 2017 | 9:45 AM EST

Things got messy on NBC’s Saturday Night Live as they demonstrated that BuzzFeed’s salacious claims of Russian blackmail were a hit piece against the President-elect. The show’s cold open was a recreation of Trump’s press conference from earlier in the week, with fake reporters asking ridiculous questions such as: “I would like to ask you about your big Russian pee pee party.” And it only went downhill from there as they took up Democratic Party talking points and targeted Kellyanne Conway’s looks. 

By Tom Johnson | January 1, 2017 | 6:59 PM EST

In the mid-1990s, when the great Norm Macdonald was kicking off his “Weekend Update” segments of Saturday Night Live with, “And now, the fake news,” pretty much everyone knew what he meant. These days, however, disputes over definitions of “fake news” seem as common as fake news itself. It may be that the lefty writer angriest about fake news is media critic and political blogger Allison Hantschel, who in a Tuesday post at First Draft blamed the problem on both conservative media (for undermining the mainstream media) and the MSM (for not vigorously defending itself until it was too late).