By Tom Blumer | February 20, 2017 | 11:28 AM EST

On Friday at CNN, a clearly upset Don Lemon, covering a topic that almost no one in the press cared about for eight years during the Obama administration, abruptly ended a segment about the costs of protecting President Donald Trump and the First Family, and began to walk away from the set before the next commercial break began. Why? One of his panelists called the obsession with these costs "fake news." The panelist who set Lemon off, Paris Dennard, who describes himself as "a GOP political commentator and consultant," got Lemon's goat when he stood his ground despite pressure from Lemon and ridicule from two of the other three panelists.

By Brad Wilmouth | February 19, 2017 | 4:42 PM EST

On Sunday's Fareed Zakaria GPS on CNN, during the show's opening "Fareed's Take" commentary, host Zakaria portrayed President Donald Trump as getting very little accomplished apart from "hot air," and mocked those who voted for him by cracking, "How's that working out for you?" Referring to voters who supported Trump in the presidential election in spite of his flaws, Zakaria opened his commentary with an obvious slap at them: "Let's say you are a Trump voter -- the kind you often hear about: an honest, hard-working American who put up with Donald Trump's unusual behavior because you wanted a President who would stop playing Washington's political games, bring a businessman's obsession with action and results, and focus on the economy. How's that working out for you?"

By Nicholas Fondacaro | February 17, 2017 | 1:40 PM EST

Thursday was the national “Day Without Immigrants” protest, an event where immigrants of all statuses walked out of their jobs and schools and protested President Donald Trump. The protest was like candy to the liberal Big Three networks, all of which conducted full reports. “There were protests and walkouts across the country today aimed at demonstrating immigrants' impact on this economy,” announced anchor David Muir on World News Tonight, “It comes after a week of sweeps by immigration authorities and hundreds of arrests.” 

By Tom Johnson | February 16, 2017 | 9:02 PM EST

John McCain’s 2008 campaign slogan, “Country First,” does not describe the worldview of Republicans, suggested Pierce on Monday. For them, the Esquire blogger implied, it’s more like “GOP über alles.” The peg for the post was chit-chat in the political and media worlds about whether President Trump is of sound mind, or, as Pierce put it, about “the possibility that the presidential trolley has left whatever tracks it had in the first place.”

By Nicholas Fondacaro | February 16, 2017 | 12:04 AM EST

CNN took the time during Wednesday’s edition of The Lead to take jabs at President Donald Trump for not being able to get much done during his first three and a half weeks besides create controversy. When asked by host Jake Tapper to walk him through the events of Trump’s first month in office, reporter Tom Foreman joked that “it's more like staggering than walking cause it's quite an experience.” He poked fun at the fledgling administration’s trip ups and hammered it with the accomplishments of past administrations. 

By Brad Wilmouth | February 14, 2017 | 6:19 PM EST

In the editorial titled "The Grand Old Party of Disenfranchisement," the Washington Post rides to the defense of convicted felons by conflating the rights of criminals with the rights of blacks in taking aim at Virginia Republicans who are pushing to make it more difficult for felons to regain their right to vote. In its first sentence, the article accuses the Virginia GOP of trying to "suppress" the "African-American vote" in recent years: "Virginia Republicans have labored in recent years, by an array of legislative and judicial means, to suppress the vote -- specifically, the African-American vote -- in an effort to nudge a presidential swing state into the GOP column."

By Melissa Mullins | February 8, 2017 | 9:55 PM EST

If you were like one of the many viewers watching the Super Bowl LI, you may have seen a commercial from the American Petroleum Institute (API) with the catchy opening line, “This ain’t your daddy’s oil.” It was actually a play on General Motors’ 1988 commercial pitch, “this is not your father’s Oldsmobile,” in an effort to attract a younger generation. 

By Walter E. Williams | February 8, 2017 | 1:42 PM EST

There is little question in most academic research that increases in the minimum wage lead to increases in unemployment. The debatable issue is the magnitude of the increase. An issue not often included in minimum wage debates is the substitution effects of minimum wage increases. The substitution effect might explain why Business for a Fair Minimum Wage, a national network of business owners and executives, argues for higher minimum wages. Let's look at substitution effects in general.

 

By Tom Blumer | February 8, 2017 | 12:12 PM EST

At the Associated Press, George P. Shultz, James A. Baker III and six other formerly despised Republicans and business leaders have suddenly become "GOP senior statesman." What accounts for this instant transformation? The group is pushing what it calls a "Conservative Case for Carbon Dividends.” In a Tuesday evening Wall Street Journal op-ed, Shultz and Baker advocated "a gradually increasing carbon tax" accompanied by massive redistributions of income. The AP's headline writers and reporters Catherine Lucey and Julie Pace could barely conceal their glee. In the process, they massively misrepresented the results of the Obama administration's efforts to build up "renewable energy from sources like solar."

 

By Nicholas Fondacaro | February 8, 2017 | 12:42 AM EST

Things became awkward during CNN’s The Future of Obamacare debate Tuesday night, as Senator Bernie Sanders appeared to become a little irritated with a small business owner who admitted to him that she was not providing health care for her employees. Texas salon chain owner La Ronda Hunter explained to the senator that because of Obamacare’s mandates she could not expand her business and could not pay for their care. Sanders’ reaction was tantamount to him saying ‘too bad so sad.’ 

By Brad Wilmouth | February 7, 2017 | 5:07 PM EST

Appearing as a guest on Monday's Andrea Mitchell Reports on MSNBC, New York Times columnist Tom Friedman incorrectly claimed that there has only been one case of a foreign-born terrorist staging an attack in the United States when there have, in fact, been a significant number of cases. Friedman: "Of course we want people vetted. I mean, but who said the vetting system had failed us? What is the proof of that? The Orlando attack was done by an American-born Muslim, Boston basically the same thing. There was a case obviously in San Bernardino. That's, you know, one out of how many?"

By Nicholas Fondacaro | February 6, 2017 | 9:46 PM EST

It appears that on Monday night CBS wanted to follow in NBC’s lead, from earlier that morning, and highlight the super bowl ads that pushed the liberal agenda. “The 1984 Wendy's super bowl ad finding its way into the presidential campaign. Well this year, in something of an end reverse, politics found its way into the Super Bowl ads,” hyped anchor Scott Pelley, while reporter Don Dahler touted, “Super Bowl LI saw a relatively new player in the ad game. Ideology.”