By Curtis Houck | January 19, 2017 | 8:32 PM EST

Less than a day after CNN wondered what would happen if President-elect Trump were assassinated, MSNBC’s Hardball host Chris Matthews tried to instill fear in viewers late Thursday, floating the idea that Trump might need to use the nuclear launch codes on Inauguration Day.

By Tom Blumer | December 26, 2016 | 10:46 PM EST

Nate Silver has been the establishment press's designated polling hero since 2008, when he correctly predicted the outcome of that year's presidential contest in 49 of 50 states. He also had a great year in 2012, predicting all 50 states' presidential preference results.

This year's election? Not so much. Donald Trump won, and Silver is not handling it well. In fact, he's violated one of the cardinal rules of far-left media members, which is to never directly betray your fever-swamp biases and the breathtaking ignorance which can be inferred from them until you either retire or migrate to public broadcasting.

By Jack Coleman | November 10, 2016 | 8:43 PM EST

Remember how liberals went over-the-top apoplectic when Donald Trump declined to explicitly state that he would accept the results of the election? And what are we seeing after Trump's victory? The most infantile elements of the left -- pardon the redundancy -- engaging in a collective hissy fit and refusing to accept the results of the election.

MSNBC's Rachel Maddow tried last night to serve up a justifiable rationale for this churlish refusal and instead made a laughable analogy.

By Curtis Houck | March 3, 2016 | 2:52 AM EST

In one of the more intriguing historical analogies you’ll see made in this presidential election, MSNBC’s The Last Word host Lawrence O’Donnell compared the 13 days until the March 15 Republican primaries that could decide whether or not Donald Trump is the GOP presidential nominee to the Cuban Missile Crisis from the 1960s. 

By Mark Finkelstein | July 28, 2015 | 8:03 AM EDT

Israelis wouldn't have to be marched to ovens.  The ovens would come to them, in the form of an atomic bomb.

On today's Morning JoeWashington Post columnist Eugene Robinson said that he was "offended" by Mike Huckabee's remark that President Obama's Iran deal would "take the Israelis and march them to the door of the oven." Robinson said the comment runs counter to the purpose of Israel, which is that "nobody is going to be marched toward any ovens."

By Curtis Houck | September 11, 2014 | 2:28 AM EDT

After President Obama’s speech to the nation on Wednesday night, CNN brought on its newly-minted senior political commenator and former Obama White House press secretary Jay Carney and Republican Senator John McCain (Ariz.) to comment on what the President’s speech regarding U.S policy in dealing withy the Islamic terrorist group ISIS. However, the next eight minutes instantly evolved into a heated debate between the two over the President’s actions of withdrawing troops from Iraq early in his administration and whether that allowed a threat like ISIS to proliferate.

By Brent Baker | March 16, 2013 | 1:16 PM EDT

The Obama administration in 2009 dropped the Bush administration’s plan to add missile interceptor capability against North Korea, yet on Friday, when Obama’s Pentagon realized their error and scrambled to announce a reversal to implement the Bush plan, ABC, CBS and NBC failed to mention Obama’s dereliction. (Below: Krauthmmer zinged “Democratic resistance” to missile defense. “Reagan was right.”)

By Tom Blumer | November 24, 2012 | 8:37 AM EST

Well, that didn't take long. Fulfilling a fear expressed on Tuesday by David Horovitz in the Times of Israel, someone is already using the country's mostly (but to be sure, not completely) successful deployment of its Iron Dome missile defense system as an argument against Israel's right to robustly defend itself.

The assertion came the very next day in the form of a tweet from a member of the establishment press (how unsurprising), one Anthony De Rosa from Reuters, the wire service's Director of Social Media. Alert responder "Robbie Guy" posted a riposte so deliciously effective that De Rosa removed the tweet. Too late. The takedown came after Simon Plosker at Honest Reporting (HT Bruce Kesler at at Maggie's Farm via Instapundit) had captured shots of both items.

By Tom Blumer | November 19, 2012 | 11:06 PM EST

Despite evidence reported elsewhere, a Monday story in the New York Times by Fares Akram, Jodi Rudoren and Alan Cowell described the bombing of "two buildings housing local broadcasters and production companies used by foreign outlets" as a possible example of Israel "targeting journalists" -- while ignoring one "little" thing. As the Washington Free Beacon noted (HT Instapundit), "Four senior Islamic Jihad terrorists were using the media building as a hideout. They were killed in the Israeli strike." Additionally, the Times reporters downplayed the high-percentage effectiveness of Israel's Iron Dome missile defense system in blowing up Hamas rockets before they could cause any damage.

What follows are the two "don't let the facts get in the way of a good story" paragraphs from the Times, as well as those relating to Iron Dome's results thus far:

By Ken Shepherd | May 4, 2012 | 2:48 PM EDT

"Russia's top military officer told a conference in Moscow attended by senior U.S. and NATO officials that Russia would mount a preemptive strike on U.S.-led NATO missile defense facilities in Eastern Europe if Washington goes ahead with its plan to build a missile shield," the Associated Press has reported.

The Washington Post carried the 5-paragraph story, but buried it on page A6 of the May 4 paper under the headline, "Military ups the ante on missile defense."

By Noel Sheppard | January 22, 2011 | 5:35 PM EST

Rachel Maddow had a very tough evening Friday.

Before telling a 100 percent falsehood about Reaganomics on HBO's "Real Time," the MSNBC commentator said the Strategic Defense Initiative would never work because you can't shoot a missile out of the sky with another missile (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By Colleen Raezler | April 23, 2010 | 10:21 AM EDT

The Pentagon rescinded the invitation of evangelist Franklin Graham to speak at its May 6 National Day of Prayer event because of complaints about his previous comments about Islam.

The Military Religious Freedom Foundation expressed its concern over Graham's involvement with the event in an April 19 letter sent to Secretary of Defense Robert Gates. MRFF's complaint about Graham, the son of Rev. Billy Graham, focused on remarks he made after 9/11 in which he called Islam "wicked" and "evil" and his lack of apology for those words.

Col. Tom Collins, an Army spokesman, told ABC News on April 22, "This Army honors all faiths and tries to inculcate our soldiers and work force with an appreciation of all faiths and his past comments just were not appropriate for this venue."