By Julia A. Seymour | December 4, 2015 | 10:51 AM EST

Biofuels should serve as an instructive lesson for negotiators in Paris, because they are proof that not all energy sources work as well as anticipated. But journalists are unlikely to remind them or the public.

The early 2000s were the heyday of good press for biofuels. Major newspapers like The New York Times ran stories about Willie Nelson’s biodiesel startup and individuals converting their vehicles into “veggie” cars to run on french fry grease and other forms of biodiesels. The Washington Post even editorialized about people “dreaming big” plans like replacing hydrocarbon fuels (gasoline) with biodiesels.

By Julia A. Seymour | December 1, 2015 | 10:12 AM EST

Certain types of energy are certain targets for the 190 governments’ representatives gathering in Paris this week  and from green activists surrounding the melee.

The goal of the U.N. climate conference in Paris, known as COP21, is to get an international agreement on reducing carbon emissions, out of fear that climate change is a global threat. But the agenda of some developing nations to make rich nations like the U.S. pay them billions of dollars to fund a transition to “clean energy” reveals one reason clean energy goals aren’t realistic.

By Michael McKinney | November 2, 2015 | 5:11 PM EST

Monday’s Morning Joe featured a discussion with Richard Stengel, the Undersecretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs. What proceeded was a discussion of the administration for securing the Iran Deal, without any effort to release Journalist Jason Rezaian, or the other three hostages of the government in Iran. Stengel would try to defend the lack of action, by highlighting that other governments do the same, but the Morning Joe crew was not having any of it.

By Michael McKinney | October 2, 2015 | 5:23 PM EDT

On The Late Show with Stephen Colbert on Thursday night, Secretary of State John Kerry came on to explain how wonderful the Iran deal is. Colbert began by saying “Congratulations for the Iran deal,” as the New York crowd cheered and clapped. After that, Colbert did present Kerry with what opponents might say, bringing up the comparison of Neville Chamberlain's "Peace in Our Time" and asked how the Iran Deal wasn’t a capitulation to an adversary. Kerry would eventually invoke the imagery of Vietnam to explain why he has fought so hard to complete the Iran Deal.

By Tom Johnson | May 24, 2015 | 1:36 PM EDT

Today’s conservative legislators may not be as dumb as a box of rocks or so dumb it takes them an hour and a half to watch 60 Minutes (HT: Rodney Dangerfield) but Daily Kos writer Hunter is willing to claim that they’re “the dumbest we've ever had. You have to credit the tea party Republicans for that one—they know what they want, and by golly if it can ooze its way into a suit and tie they'll vote for it.”

Unfortunately, added Hunter in a Wednesday post, many if not most Americans are unaware of this breathtaking GOP stupidity because the media have “ratchet[ed] down their own expectations [of Republicans]…The pundit class all just grits their teeth and tries their best to present all of this as the new normal.”

What set Hunter off were comments from Republican senator Ron Johnson of Wisconsin that in regard to the Iran nuclear talks, he didn’t trust Iranian head of state Ali Khamenei but also was “not so sure I’m trusting President Obama.”

By Curtis Houck | March 2, 2015 | 10:31 PM EST

Following a morning in which NBC’s Today offered only criticism of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for his visit to the United States, Monday’s NBC Nightly News continued piling on the denunciation of Netanyahu for creating a “storm of controversy” during “a tense and critical moment” in U.S.-Iran nuclear negotiations. Fill-in anchor Savannah Guthrie proclaimed that a “storm of controversy” was brewing “as the Israeli Prime Minister arrives in Washington to deliver a warning to America.”

By Tom Blumer | November 24, 2014 | 6:16 PM EST

As of 5:30 p.m. ET today, a search on "Koningstein" at the Associated Press's national web site returned no results.

That's an indication that the wire service's globaloney-believing pseudo-science reporters are still trying to figure out how to respond to a November 18 article in the IEEE Spectrum by Ross Koningstein & David Fork, a pair of Google engineers tasked by the company in 2007 to "tackle the world’s climate and energy problems." The pair, whose active work on the project at Google ended in 2011, have concluded, as succinctly stated in the UK Register (HT Instapundit), that renewable energy sources "will never permit the human race to cut CO2 emissions to the levels demanded by climate activists."

By Curtis Houck | November 12, 2014 | 10:44 PM EST

During Wednesday’s NBC Nightly News, NBC’s chief environmental affairs correspondent Anne Thompson enthusiastically promoted the global warming agreement between the United States and China that was announced earlier in the day, but fretted that Republicans were “already putting up roadblocks if congressional action is needed.”

Anchor Brian Williams hyped that it was “[a] surprise announcement” and “a history making deal” that will “greatly reduce carbon emissions.” Those generous descriptions segued into Thompson’s report as she mentioned that deal was between the two nations that were responsible for “producing 39 percent of the world’s greenhouse gases last year.”

By Julia A. Seymour | July 9, 2014 | 7:17 PM EDT

Bloomberg’s Eric Roston attempted to keep a straight face while promoting a draft report for the United Nations. It said U.S. emissions would need to be “cut to one-tenth of current levels, per person, in less than 40 years.” Short of societal regression, it is unclear how that could be done.

“It’s perilous to say these things in the U.S., where a mere description of the scale of the climate challenge too often invites ridicule and dismissiveness. Americans are each responsible for about 18 tons of carbon dioxide a year. Taking that down 90 percent would mean a drop in emissions to what they were in about 1901 or 1902. Cue ridicule and dismissiveness,” Roston wrote.

By Matthew Balan | November 25, 2013 | 1:02 PM EST

Charlie Rose and Norah O'Donnell stayed true to form and badgered a Republican/conservative guest on Monday's CBS This Morning – this time, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor over his criticism of the Obama administration's nuclear deal with Iran. Rose questioned the congressman's opposition to the proposal, which he labeled "dangerous". Rose asked, "Why isn't that a good deal to freeze things and delay?"

O'Donnell twice touted the deal as "positive", in an attempt to defend the White House's controversial diplomatic efforts: [MP3 audio available here; video below the jump]

By Noel Sheppard | April 6, 2013 | 3:48 PM EDT

"If he’s not assassinated or not overthrown in a coup, he’s going to be in power for 40 years, and he is going to wed those atomic bombs to those missiles, and he’ll be able to threaten South Korea and Japan and U.S. bases in Asia.”

So said Pat Buchanan about North Korea's Kim Jong Un on PBS's McLaughlin Group Friday.

By Scott Whitlock | July 18, 2012 | 12:18 PM EDT

All three evening newscasts on Tuesday and two out of the three morning shows on Wednesday skipped the dramatic story of an elderly Florida man who saved a cafe full of people from gun-wielding robbers. Only Good Morning America covered the story of seventy-one-year-old Samuel Williams using his own weapon to fend off attackers.

News reader Josh Elliot lauded the "gun-toting senior citizen" for his quick action and for "not taking it anymore." Co-host George Stephanopoulos narrated the video: "There he is right there. Takes them on. Saves the whole cafe." Elliott praised it as "remarkable." He misleadingly described, "Williams does have a gun license and is not expected to be charged." [See video below. MP3 audio here.]