By Tom Blumer | May 14, 2016 | 11:00 AM EDT

The establishment press has given an open mic to proponents of raising the minimum wage nationally, and has cheered $15-per-hour legislation passed in California and New York earlier this year as "historic."

The silence from those same quarters, e.g., the Associated Press, the New York Times and others, is deafening now that one of the predictions of those who have criticized such sharp increases, which take the minimum to double the current federal level of $7.25 and triple the $5.15 seen in early 2007, is beginning to come true. Critics have contended that employers would mechanize key processes to control their labor costs faster than they otherwise would have. That is exactly what The Wendy's Company, "the world's third-largest quick-service hamburger company," is about to start doing.

By Curtis Houck | May 12, 2016 | 3:35 PM EDT

In an analysis for the front page of Wednesday’s New York Times business section, Eduardo Porter trumpeted that the real issue ailing the American economy and impeding on its improvement is the lack of mass government jobs programs similar to its “large and underappreciated role in reshaping” the country during the 19th and 20th centuries. 

By Brad Wilmouth | May 12, 2016 | 12:58 AM EDT

During a discussion of GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump indicating that he was willing to negotiate over both taxes and the minimum wage, and possibly end up raising taxes on the wealthy, CNN's Wolf Blitzer on The Situation Room praised the GOP candidate for having a willingness to compromise, unlike "some very conservative Republican hardliners."

By Tom Blumer | May 11, 2016 | 5:14 PM EDT

In case you didn't get the message the first or second time around, the Washington Post wants you to hear it again: Cool your complaints about the weak U.S. economy, because it's your fault.

To be clear, the problem is primarily with the Post's headline — "The economy’s real drag: Us" — than with Robert J. Samuelson's content, which at least gave American consumers credit for having "sobered up" as the reason for the increased savings rate which is supposedly holding the economy back. That said, the longtime Post writer missed a number of other key factors explaining why consumers aren't spending as they did in the decades before the recession.

By Kyle Drennen | May 2, 2016 | 1:00 PM EDT

On Monday, all three network morning shows covered the violent May Day rioting that broke out across Seattle on Sunday. However, the NBC, ABC, and CBS broadcasts made sure to tout how “the march began as a peaceful demonstration for the rights of workers and immigrants.” No liberal labels were used to characterize the protesters and the reporters avoided explaining the Communist roots of the day.

By Tom Johnson | April 28, 2016 | 10:22 PM EDT

New York magazine’s Jonathan Chait admires Bernie Sanders’s willingness (eagerness?) to raise taxes so as to “finance the kind of social benefits American liberals would prefer.” That’s why Chait is disappointed that Sanders opposes Philadelphia’s proposed three-cents-per-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened drinks, revenue from which would fund citywide pre-kindergarten and other programs.

In a Tuesday post, Chait wrote that Sanders “has received justifiable credit for breaking the taboo on middle-class taxation and asking just why it is that Americans must be denied public services taken for granted elsewhere…But where does this leave his opposition to the soda tax? His position is strange and ironic because taxes on specifically defined, unhealthy goods has long been the loophole through which Democrats escape the pressure of their own no-taxes-on-the-middle-class vise…What’s more, the proceeds of the soda tax finance a vital liberal social goal (in this case, early education).”

By Curtis Houck | April 22, 2016 | 1:41 PM EDT

In Slate’s weekly “Political Gabfest” podcast, CBS News political director and Face the Nation host John Dickerson proclaimed that Hillary Clinton’s e-mail scandal is “a stupid issue” unlike the debate over a $15 minimum wage because that’s “the central question of the campaign, which is how do you help people with wages.”

By Tom Blumer | April 20, 2016 | 11:54 PM EDT

On April 1, the Associated Press, in an online video which I covered in an April 2 NewsBusters post, interviewed three California business owners about the impact the state's just-passed $15-per-hour minimum wage would have on their businesses.

Though the video was headlined "Small Businesses React to Calif. Wage Increase," the owners interviewed weren't representative of the whole state in any way. All three are based in San Francisco. Two of the three are supporters of the minimum-wage increase; the third, a small bookstore owner, thinks businesses like his should have been exempt, as the increase should only have targeted "multinational corporations that make billions of dollar of profits." It turns out that two of the three owners interviewed by AP were also interviewed by Susan Adams at Forbes on March 31. That can't possibly be a wild coincidence.

By Tom Blumer | April 19, 2016 | 6:04 PM EDT

Has Newsweek just admitted to something the rest of the press knows but won't acknowledge?

In promoting its insufferably fawning portrayal of California Governor Jerry Brown, the weekly magazine tweeted that Brown is "arming California to meet an economic recession head-on." Recession? What recession?

By Tom Blumer | April 19, 2016 | 11:21 AM EDT

The government reported this morning that seasonally adjusted March housing starts and building permits fell by 8.8 percent and 7.7 percent, respectively, far worse declines than analysts and economists predicted.

After the report, the business wires at least communicated the facts accurately, but continued to insist almost to the point of editorializing that there's no reason to be worried about the long-term direction of housing market or the overall economy.

By Tom Blumer | April 13, 2016 | 11:45 AM EDT

Today's report from the government on retail sales was awful — "unexpectedly" so, according to both Bloomberg and Reuters. Following on the heels of a 0.4 percent seasonally adjusted decline in January and a flat February, March sales fell by 0.3 percent.

Two of the three main U.S. business wire services blamed the American people, not the worst post-recession economy since World War II during the Obama administration — an economy which is clearly weakening even further — for these results.

By Nicholas Fondacaro | April 12, 2016 | 5:32 PM EDT

Did you know that Tuesday was “Equal Pay Day,” the day that a woman’s pay supposedly catches up to a man’s from the previous year? Well don’t worry, Andrea Mitchell has got you covered. Mitchell brought on Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney and Hollywood star Patricia Arquette to bemoan the plight of the oppressed and push their new congressional study.