By Walter E. Williams | March 15, 2017 | 3:32 PM EDT

Most Americans, whether liberal or conservative, Democratic or Republican, do not show much understanding or respect for the principles of personal liberty. We criticize our political leaders, but we must recognize that their behavior simply reflects the values of people who elected them to office. That means we are all to blame for greater governmental control over our lives and a decline in personal liberty. Let me outline some fundamental principles of liberty.

 

By Michelle Malkin | March 8, 2017 | 2:47 PM EST

Last month, there was a national "Day Without a Latino." This week, the demonstration du jour shutting down schools and shops is a "Day Without a Women." Here's my question for all the virtue-signaling protesters who pay lip service to better jobs and wages: Where's your awareness-raising event for untold thousands of our country's high-skilled men and women victimized by H-1B visa havoc? Thanks to cheap labor-hungry big businesses and money-grubbing politicians in both parties, every day has become a "Day Without American Tech Workers."

By Tom Blumer | March 2, 2017 | 8:30 AM EST

A week ago, the Columbus Dispatch reported that Wendy's, the fast-food chain, announced "plans to install self-ordering kiosks in 1,000 of its stores — about 16 percent of its locations — by the end of the year." Although company officials observed 18 months ago that such a move would be inevitable if the trend towards laws demanding far-above-market minimum wages continued, both J.D. Malone's Dispatch story and the Associated Press's condensed version based on Malone's work do not mention minimum wages at all.

By Walter E. Williams | February 8, 2017 | 1:42 PM EST

There is little question in most academic research that increases in the minimum wage lead to increases in unemployment. The debatable issue is the magnitude of the increase. An issue not often included in minimum wage debates is the substitution effects of minimum wage increases. The substitution effect might explain why Business for a Fair Minimum Wage, a national network of business owners and executives, argues for higher minimum wages. Let's look at substitution effects in general.

 

By Nicholas Fondacaro | February 8, 2017 | 12:42 AM EST

Things became awkward during CNN’s The Future of Obamacare debate Tuesday night, as Senator Bernie Sanders appeared to become a little irritated with a small business owner who admitted to him that she was not providing health care for her employees. Texas salon chain owner La Ronda Hunter explained to the senator that because of Obamacare’s mandates she could not expand her business and could not pay for their care. Sanders’ reaction was tantamount to him saying ‘too bad so sad.’ 

By Nicholas Fondacaro | February 6, 2017 | 9:46 PM EST

It appears that on Monday night CBS wanted to follow in NBC’s lead, from earlier that morning, and highlight the super bowl ads that pushed the liberal agenda. “The 1984 Wendy's super bowl ad finding its way into the presidential campaign. Well this year, in something of an end reverse, politics found its way into the Super Bowl ads,” hyped anchor Scott Pelley, while reporter Don Dahler touted, “Super Bowl LI saw a relatively new player in the ad game. Ideology.”

By Kyle Drennen | February 6, 2017 | 12:12 PM EST

On Monday’s NBC Today, co-host Matt Lauer and substitute co-host Maria Shriver led a panel discussion reviewing some of Sunday night’s Super Bowl commercials and gushed over the “social awareness” of ads that pushed liberal agenda items like environmental activism, equal pay, and illegal immigration.

By Cal Thomas | January 31, 2017 | 4:15 PM EST

Republican members of Congress met in Philadelphia last weekend for what was called a retreat. It might have been more accurately labeled an advance. Perhaps not since the days of Franklin Roosevelt's first term has so much been done by so few that will potentially impact so many (to paraphrase Winston Churchill in a completely different context).

By Tom Blumer | January 30, 2017 | 2:02 PM EST

You would think that the establishment press and the rest of the opposition to Donald Trump's administration might be able to capitalize substantively (shrieking fundraising letters don't count as "substance") on Kellyanne Conway's shaky reference to "alternative facts" about a week ago. (She should have said, "I have different, more defensible estimates than you do," because she did.) So far they can't, and they seem unable to help themselves. When they run into facts they don't like, they suppress them and seek out — you guessed it — weak or false alternative facts to fit their narrative.

By Tom Blumer | January 28, 2017 | 8:28 PM EST

A January 24 item in the East Bay Times, which serves the San Francisco East Bay area, wondered: "What’s behind the spate of recent restaurant closures?" While it didn't ignore the problem, the article made only glancing references to current and planned increases in state and city minimum wages. Preliminary year-end statistics at the U.S. government's Bureau of Labor Statistics show that Bay area restaurant industry employment and even general retail employment have fallen, and are possibly headed towards a steep decline. One has to wonder how obvious things will have to get before the press takes the negative effects of the area's mandated sky-high minimums seriously.

By Walter E. Williams | January 12, 2017 | 1:48 PM EST

The FBI reported that the total number of homicides in 2015 was 15,696. Blacks were about 52 percent of homicide victims. That means about 8,100 black lives were ended violently, and over 90 percent of the time, the perpetrator was another black. Listening to the news media and the Black Lives Matter movement, one would think that black deaths at the hands of police are the major problem. It turns out that in 2015, police across the nation shot and killed 986 people. Of that number, 495 were white (50 percent), 258 were black (26 percent) and 172 Hispanic (17 percent).

January 4, 2017 | 3:06 PM EST

Now even the price of razors is sexist, according to one Huffington Post UK editor. Associate Women’s Editor Jenavieve Hatch applauded a British supermarket chain Tesco for lowering the price of women’s razors to that of men’s on Jan. 3, cheering, “More of this, please!”