On Thursday, Vox’s Carlos Meza released a Video on its YouTube channel comparing President Trump to Latin American dictator Hugo Chavez. This in addition to flatly calling the President a “Threat to democracy” in the same video.


HOORAY! We lost again!!! A reliable source of humor after Democrats lose elections is Vox writer Matthew Yglesias. A month ago Matthews was celebrating the loss of the democrat in the Montana special congressional election by declaring his loss to really mean a win for democrats. Yglesias continued mining this political comedy vein by declaring that the loss of Jon Ossoff in the George 6th Congressional District special election, after the party blew over $30 million on his campaign, really means that the "Republicans are in trouble."

 


In the long run, Republicans’ health-care-reform efforts are going to backfire, suggested Vox editor-in-chief Klein last Thursday. He argued that if Congress junks the Affordable Care Act, “Medicare for all” will become a rallying cry for Democrats, and once Dems return to power, “they’ll pass what many of them wanted to pass” instead of the ACA: “A heavily subsidized buy-in program for Medicare or Medicaid, funded by a tax increase on the rich. A policy like that…will satisfy an angry party seeking the fastest, most defensible path to restoring [Obamacare’s] coverage gains.”


Following the trend of blaming Trump for literally everything bad that’s happening in the U.S. and beyond, Vox contributor Julia Belluz has come up with yet another reason Trump is evil: the POTUS is giving the public “a tense political moment that might actually sicken people.” Belluz  interviewed David Williams, a professor from Harvard who co-authored a study on why anxiety and stress are “on the rise.” Williams attributed the health phenomenon to the hostility in the political environment, which is affecting people so much that premature births, deaths, and heart disease are spiking in statistics.

 


HOORAY! We lost!!! That is becoming the laughable mainstream media theme about many special elections since President Donald Trump's victory last November. We saw this happen in early March when Politico hailed Democrat performances in special elections despite the fact that there was no net change. The latest iteration of celebrating participation trophies, and likely to be repeated by mainstream media sources,  comes by way of the May 26 edition of Vox in which Matthew Yglesias declared that the loss by the Democrat candidate in the congressional special election was beyond mere good news for the Democrats. In fact the Vox headline acclaimed that Republicans' win in last night's Montana election is great news for Democrats:

 


When it’s left-wing Vox, every incident is about agenda -- sometimes with hilarious results. Soon after an impaired driver killed an 18-year-old-girl in Times Square May 18, Vox writer German Lopez wrote a think piece condemning drunken driving and criticizing the media for disproportionately covering terrorism. Lopez has a long history of being pro-marijuana, so attacking alcohol fit his pattern.


Shattered: Inside Hillary Clinton's Doomed Campaign could just as accurately been titled, Shattered: How a Pair of MSM Journalists Inadvertently Destroyed Their Credibility. The reason is that while authors Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes are now somewhat frank in revealing the faults of Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign, back when they were reporting on it they acted as cheerleaders for her.


The news media needs to follow the more “rational” and “reasonable” journalism of late night comedians, says Vox writer Carlos Maza, in a video posted Monday afternoon to the left-leaning website.  

 

Do you remember the time not so very long ago when, according to Democrats and liberals, big money in politics was the most evil thing about our political system? Well that was then. Starting most noticeably during the presidential campaign last Fall when Hillary Clinton outspent the Donald Trump campaign by about 2 to 1, Democrats and liberals have developed newfound respect for big money in politics to the extent they now actually brag about it. The latest example is Vox hyping big campaign spending in an article whose very title positively exults that Georgia Dems normally raise $10,000 for this House seat. This April they’ll have $3 million.


This past Tuesday, three prominent left-wing writers examined Paul Ryan’s health-care bill; what they see as the typical Republican attitude toward health insurance; and the modern GOP as a whole. Unsurprisingly, they found all three wanting. For example, Talking Points Memo editor and publisher Josh Marshall contended that on occasions like this that call for wonkery, Republicans are ill-equipped to deliver it, inasmuch as they’ve “spent years since 2008 (actually before but especially since 2008) stoking their base with increasingly fantastical and ridiculous claims.”


CPAC, currently going on just outside the Beltway in National Harbor, Maryland, has changed along with the conservative movement, believes Matthew Yglesias. Old-school CPAC, Yglesias contended in a Wednesday piece, was philosophically driven, populated by the sort of activists who “helped [Ronald] Reagan mount a primary challenge to incumbent President Gerald Ford.” In the past fifteen-plus years, however, it has become “to a substantial extent a live version of the conservative entertainment experience that one could also get on cable or on the radio.” In other words, it's now Donald Trump's CPAC, which “reflect[s] the reality” that conservatives are “older, whiter, and less educated than the population at large and [are] filled with a keen sense of nostalgia for the good old days.”


Talk about a stretch! Or, better, make that a streeeeeeetch. Vox has started a new type of movie review in which they take a film  and try to correrelate it to current events. Since Vox, like the rest of the MSM, is absolutely obessed by President Trump, it is no big surprise that they will apply their TDS to the reviews starting with the current movie: "Dr. Strangelove." To read the review by Alissa Wilkinson you would think Stanley Kubrick's classic dark comedy should have been named "Dr. StrangeTrump or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love The Donald."