After longtime conservative author, columnist, and think tank scholar Charles Murray was chased on Thursday from far-left Middlebury College by an angry mob, the Associated Press felt more than comfortable smearing Murray as a supposed “white nationalist.”

 


Appearing as a guest on Tuesday’s Hardball, MSNBC political analyst and USA Today senior political reporter Heidi Przybyla brazenly argued that anti-Semitism is becoming “mainstream” on the right after having been only a “fringe, alt-right, white nationalist movement.”


After President Donald Trump spent a long weekend at Mar-a-lago, Sean Spicer held his first White House press briefing of the week on Tuesday. There, he faced a slew of questioning about a string of nationwide anti-Semitic crimes, including the touting of the far-left Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC). 


The media have been promoting neo-Nazis and white nationalists in hopes to (admirably) discredit them and falsely insinuate that they were far-right conservatives who propelled Donald Trump to the White House. This trend manifested itself with five minutes and 17 seconds Tuesday morning on CBS and NBC that attempted to label the neo-Nazi conference as one featuring “conservative extremist[s]” and added up to three times more coverage than they’ve had on the March for the Life in the past four years.


In a segment attacking Donald Trump’s call to ban all Muslims from the United States, CBS This Morning’s Major Garrett on Tuesday hyped the left-wing Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) as an objective source on the subject who is hateful. Garrett began by saying of the businessman: “Trump cited polling data from the Center for Security Policy that he said indicated dangerous levels of anti–American sentiment among Muslims in the United States." With no mention of SPLC’s ideology, Garrett lectured, “The Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks hate groups nationwide, described the head of the center, Frank Gaffney as, quote, "one of America's most notorious Islamophobes." 


MTV wants white kids to feel bad about being white – and the media love it.

 

During Tuesday’s edition of Fox News Channel's The Kelly File, host Megyn Kelly and liberal radio host Richard Fowler spared over a list from the far-left Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) that included drawings of women who have denounced radical Islam that include conservative authors Ann Coulter and Laura Ingraham. At numerous instances, Kelly and Fowler found themselves repeatedly talking over each other, with Kelly denouncing the SPLC as a “careless organization that cares not at all about the safety of the people it condemns” and uses “far left websites that hate these women” to bolster their claims.


On Thursday’s network evening newscasts, the CBS Evening News and NBC Nightly News did their parts in touting the supposed state of race relations in America with CBS’s Scott Pelley holding up the deadly shooting in Charleston as “com[ing] at a time of increasing mistrust between blacks and whites” while NBC’s Harry Smith proclaimed that the “virus” of racism from the 1960s “never died.”


On Monday's New Day, CNN's Alisyn Camerota played up how the leftist Southern Poverty Law Center labeled the group targeted by two suspected Islamists in Texas a "hate group." Camerota underlined that "other people say" that Pamela Geller's American Freedom Defense Initiative (AFDI) is "even a hate group, and that they're vehemently anti-Islam....They talk about Islam, and they talk about it with, sort of, real repugnance, quite frankly."


In the wake of an attempted mass shooting at a free speech event hosted by the American Freedom Defense Initiative (AFDI) in Texas, on Monday MSNBC’s Thomas Roberts hosted Mark Potok of the far left Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) and allowed him to equate them with a “Klan group that decides to hold a cartoon contest satirizing black people.” 


“Better late than never” is apparently the new motto of Stephen Colbert, Comedy Central's faux conservative, who said on Wednesday night's edition of The Colbert Report that one new member of the Republican “farm team” has claimed that Barack Obama is allegedly possessed by a demon even though he performed an exorcism to try and "drive out the evil spirit."

The host's target was Gordon Klingenschmitt, a former Navy chaplain and host of an online religious program carried by YouTube who received 70 percent of the votes cast in last week's midterm election and will soon become a member of the Colorado legislature.


How’s this for timing? The Washington Post’s Valerie Strauss, on the two-year-anniversary of the FRC shooting, launched its own attack on FRC – with the help of a study released by the Southern Poverty Law Center, the same group that inspired that shooter. 

Here’s a quick recap: on August 15, 2012, a gunman entered the lobby of the Family Research Council in Washington D.C, planning to kill everyone inside the building and then smear Chick-Fil-A sandwiches in their faces (at the time, Chick-Fil-A was under fire for comments that its CEO, Dan Cathy, had made in support of traditional marriage). The gunman’s plot was only foiled by the quick thinking of the building manager, Leo Johnson, who ended up taking a bullet in the arm in the process.