By Tom Blumer | January 30, 2017 | 2:02 PM EST

You would think that the establishment press and the rest of the opposition to Donald Trump's administration might be able to capitalize substantively (shrieking fundraising letters don't count as "substance") on Kellyanne Conway's shaky reference to "alternative facts" about a week ago. (She should have said, "I have different, more defensible estimates than you do," because she did.) So far they can't, and they seem unable to help themselves. When they run into facts they don't like, they suppress them and seek out — you guessed it — weak or false alternative facts to fit their narrative.

By Tom Blumer | August 10, 2016 | 4:44 PM EDT

In a New York Times op-ed with so many holes it wouldn't hold up as swiss cheese, two political science profs, Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson, set out to reassure the leftist elites that "The Path to Prosperity Is Blue." This would be pretty funny if it weren't for the fact that many of the Old Gray Lady's smug readers will actually buy this nonsense. The pair's presentation tortures economic and other statistics so badly that they make getting waterboarded look like a walk in Central Park.

By Brad Wilmouth | August 2, 2016 | 11:05 AM EDT

As RNC chairman Reince Priebus appeared as a guest on Sunday's Face the Nation, CBS host John Dickerson -- using a comment from GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump about not wanting to be a "puppet" for Republican donors -- asked the RNC chairman if Republicans like Mike Pence, Scott Walker and Paul Ryan are "puppets" for the conservative Koch brothers.

By Clay Waters | January 18, 2016 | 9:01 AM EST

More proof arrived on Sunday that the New York Times will never forgive conservative Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker for successfully taming his state's public unions and then surviving an expensive, union-funded recall election. Contributing “writer and musician” Dan Kaufman: “The Destruction of Progressive Wisconsin.” The text box: “Scott Walker has turned his state into a laboratory for the evisceration of labor.”

By Tom Blumer | January 5, 2016 | 5:31 PM EST

At the Associated Press, Wisconsin-based reporter Scott Bauer, who has spent the better part of the past five years describing Badger State Governor Scott Walker as "polarizing," has been given the opportunity to get involved with 2016 presidential campaign coverage.

Leftists and Democrats rarely earn negative descriptors in Bauer's reports, while Republicans and conservatives receive them routinely. Now that he has been tasked to cover Ted Cruz, Bauer has been using a scattershot approach, employing a plethora of negative terms, apparently in search of one or two which will cast the the Texas Senator in the most negative light possible.

By Tom Blumer | November 11, 2015 | 11:39 PM EST

Just as a reality check, I asked a friend today what his reaction would be if I said with a sincere-sounding voice that he makes me want to strangle him. He said, "Almost sounds like a threat." I said, "No, it was supposed to be a joke." He said, "No it's not."

I also asked another person what her reaction would be if I earnestly called her "demented." She said, "You'd be insulting me." I asked, "What if I said I was just joking?" Response: "I'd say, 'The heck you were.'" In the past ten days, members of the press have decided that threatening language and an insult, both directed at GOP presidential candidate Carly Fiorina, were only "jokes." There is virtually no chance that these same people would give the same treatment to threats and insults directed at Democrats and leftists.

By NB Staff | October 1, 2015 | 3:35 PM EDT

"Pope Francis also visited the White House last week.  But his Holiness was confused by Vice President Biden, who congratulated the Pope on the Cardinals having the best record in the league." 

By Tom Johnson | September 23, 2015 | 10:13 PM EDT

A few months ago, many liberals, including much of the bloggerati, were afraid that Walker had a good chance to win not only the Republican presidential nomination but also the presidency. Now that Walker’s out of the GOP race, several lefty pundits have weighed in on why.

By Clay Waters | September 23, 2015 | 9:35 PM EDT

Jason Horowitz, one of the New York Times more colorful reporters, gave Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker a gleeful finger upon his departure from the Republican presidential race, suggesting Walker has advanced his career on racist appeals in "Dismal Finish Is a Fitting Result, Old Foes Say." Horowitz wrote on Tuesday: "Old political adversaries of Mr. Walker greeted his dour denouement as a fitting result for a politician who they say began and furthered his career here with a divisive style, a penchant for turning out conservative supporters rather than working with opponents, and tacit racial appeals in one of the nation’s most segregated cities. But the irony is that Mr. Walker was eclipsed by candidates who have ignited the Republican base with more overtly nativist and, their critics argue, racist appeals." Those "racist appeals"? Actually tough-on-crime proposals targeted at victims of crime in Milwaukee.

By Curtis Houck | September 22, 2015 | 6:21 PM EDT

Reduced to a daily podcast after his MSNBC show was cancelled in July, liberal Ed Schultz spent the first minute and a half of his Tuesday podcast basking in the departure of Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker from the 2016 Republican field and slamming Walker as “a freaking loser” and “embarrassment” who lacks “the academic credentials or the intelligence to be president of the United States.”

By Curtis Houck | September 22, 2015 | 1:40 AM EDT

On Monday, ABC’s World News Tonight and the CBS Evening News failed to devote a full story to Republican Governor Scott Walker (Wisc.) dropping out of the 2016 presidential campaign with the latter only giving Walker a combined 57 seconds at the beginning and end of a report on Ben Carson’s comments about a hypothetical president who was Muslim.

By Scott Whitlock | August 25, 2015 | 4:50 PM EDT

According to a new Media Research Center report, the three networks are minimizing every Republican presidential candidate not named Donald Trump. In addition to ignoring policy proposals from Republicans such as Scott Walker, ABC, NBC and CBS are avoiding raising any questions about extremely harsh attacks. Congresswoman Gwen Moore of Wisconsin said this of Walker: "[Walker was] literally campaigning around the state, saying you don't want to be like Milwaukee, while at the same time really tightening the noose, literally, around African-Americans."