By Randy Hall | March 22, 2017 | 8:32 PM EDT

Since CNN’s middle name is “News,” viewers of the weekday morning New Day program expect to catch up on the latest headlines and watch in-depth investigations on the topics of the day. That wasn’t quite the case on Wednesday, when the final segment of the program was devoted to a “hard-hitting” report on whether President Donald Trump is afraid of stairs.

The two-minute segment by Jeanne Moos, the network’s national correspondent, focused on several British newspapers that claim the GOP occupant of the White House has “bathmophobia,” the fear of stairs and slopes.

By Tom Johnson | March 17, 2017 | 8:58 PM EDT

Esquire’s Charles Pierce is accusing President Trump of adding to something he vowed to subtract from. In a Thursday post, Pierce called the White House’s proposed federal budget a “vast, noxious swamp into which all those tributaries of modern conservative thought have emptied themselves. People die in there, swallowed up in deep sinkholes of empowered bigotry and class anger.”

By Curtis Houck | February 23, 2017 | 9:12 PM EST

MSNBC’s Hardball host Chris Matthews compared White House chief strategist Steve Bannon on Thursday to Star Wars villain Darth Vader, even though “he’s a good speaker” albeit “a little strong but, you know, that’s part of the deal he’s got.”

By Tom Johnson | January 12, 2017 | 9:01 PM EST

Logic and proportion may be non-factors in media coverage of Donald Trump’s presidency, fears Lloyd Grove. In a Wednesday column, Grove opined that journalism “is in danger of passing through the looking glass, only to land in a menacing, topsy-turvy world, namely the White House Press Room…It’s likely to be [a] place where language will occasionally signify its opposite, and government spokespeople will declare, as Humpty Dumpty famously scolded Alice, ‘When I use a word, it means what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.’” The key to this process, indicated Grove, is the use of the term “fake news” as the “Trump administration’s rightwing-populist bludgeon to delegitimize the purveyors of real news.” Among Grove's expert witnesses: Dan Rather.

By Brad Wilmouth | December 4, 2016 | 2:56 PM EST

On Sunday's Reliable Sources on CNN, while introducing a segment about how to deal with a President Donald Trump when he "lies" about something, host Brian Stelter dubiously included a clip of former President George W. Bush from his April 2013 speech declaring that the U.S. had "prevailed" in Iraq as an example of Presidents telling "lies" alongside deliberate presidential deceptions like Bill Clinton's "I did not have sexual relations with that woman," Barack Obama's "If you like your current insurance, you keep that insurance," and Richard Nixon's "I'm not a crook."

By Clay Waters | December 4, 2016 | 9:05 AM EST

Presidential visits to wounded soldiers at Walter Reed should be non-political events worthy of non-partisan coverage, but the New York Times manages to shows its colors even in those solemn moments. In the half-page “Obama’s Sacred Duty: Visiting the Wounded -- Trips to Walter Reed Take Toll and Inspire," reporter Gardiner Harris brought a somber, emotional, personalized tone to the proceedings. But visits by George W. Bush were greeted with terse headlines and criticism.

By Tom Johnson | November 30, 2016 | 9:23 PM EST

When Donald Trump is POTUS, he’s likely to get deferential, even helpful, media coverage, predicted Atrios on Monday. After all, he explained, that’s been the pattern for Republican presidents since the 1980s. When Ronald Reagan was in the White House, Atrios alleged, “members of the press knew that [he] had some form of dementia, that he was not actually fit to run the country, and they covered it up because the feefees of America would be hurt because Reagan was the most popular president in the history of the universe. Of course he wasn't the most popular president by any reasonable measure, but the press loved him so America loved him and they added 10 extra points to his popularity rating in their minds. They did that for [George W. Bush], also, too.”

By Matthew Balan | November 22, 2016 | 2:53 PM EST

On Tuesday, CBS This Morning went gaga over liberal comedian Jon Stewart's and the 17 years of his Daily Show. Charlie Rose gushed that "it became, for all of us, a, kind of, cultural event — more than a show." He later added, "There was nothing quite like him. A lot of people did it very well....But Jon had a special place." Rose, along with Gayle King and Norah O'Donnell, later marveled over the show's "extraordinary collection" of comedians. The newscast also touted several clips of the Comedy Central program mocking Republicans.

By Tom Johnson | November 19, 2016 | 1:55 PM EST

Major similarities between the 2016 presidential election and that of 2000 don’t end with the Democrat winning the popular vote but losing the electoral vote, claims Marcotte, who contended that the media had it in for Hillary Clinton the same way they did for Al Gore, and that in each case biased campaign coverage was a factor in driving down Democratic voter turnout. Regarding this year’s race, Marcotte remarked, “Replace ‘I invented the internet’ with ‘emails,’ ‘Naomi Wolf’ with ‘pneumonia’ and ‘Ralph Nader’ with ‘Jill Stein,’ and you’re looking at a rerun.”

By Justin Ashford | November 11, 2016 | 12:07 AM EST

It’s okay to call President Obama cool again, according to NBC’s Superstore. Quite the change from 2012 when almost anything said about him was considered racist, including the word “cool.”

By Brad Wilmouth | November 5, 2016 | 11:53 PM EDT

On Friday's Real Time on HBO, far left host Bill Maher seemed to be in a panic over the possibility that Donald Trump will be elected President, as he repeatedly hit on his worries that there is a "slow-moving, right-wing coup" that will bring to power a "fascist" President Trump, even going so far as to invoke the Rwanda genocide of the 1990s and Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler. Maher even ended up admitting that he and other liberals "cried wolf" in their attacks on President George W. Bush and GOP candidates Mitt Romney and John McCain, calling it a "big mistake" on their part.

By Tom Blumer | November 3, 2016 | 3:41 PM EDT

A decade ago, the press burned through tons of newsprint, hours and hours of broadcast time, and huge amounts of Internet bandwidth obsessing over the possibility that Karl Rove, President George W. Bush's closest adviser, would be indicted in connection with the alleged revelation of the name of CIA agent Valerie Plame.