Saturday’s women’s march doesn’t stand for all women, according to pro-life women leaders. In exclusive statements, national pro-life leaders called the upcoming Women’s March on Washington hypocritical for excluding pro-life women while claiming to stand for all women. Pro-life groups Students for Life, Susan B. Anthony List and Family Research Council all chimed in. From criticizing the march for becoming a “Protect Planned Parenthood” event and marginalizing women to calling out the media’s gushing coverage, they emphasized the march doesn’t represent them.


CNN's Don Lemon acted more like a socially-left activist than a journalist on Friday's New Day, as he moderated a panel discussion on a proposed religious liberty law in Mississippi. Lemon twice misrepresented what the law actually says, and asked a LGBT activist, "Religious liberty — is that just a code for discrimination — I don't want to provide services to certain people? Isn't that just a code?" He was more explicit later in the segment: "People in certain professions...wouldn't have to serve certain people — which, at its base, is discrimination."


CNN's Chris Cuomo again acted like a LGBT activist on Monday's New Day, as he interviewed Peter Sprigg from the socially conservative Family Research Council. Cuomo raised the specter of Jim Crow when he claimed that a proposed First Amendment Defense Act in Congress "does smack familiar to what happened in the wake of the miscegenation laws and the civil rights laws, where ...some cited the Bible; some stated religion – and said, it's against my beliefs. I shouldn't have to participate."


As the Big Three networks were touting President Obama's claim that climate change affects the health of children – including that of his own daughter – on Wednesday, their morning and evening newscasts have yet to report on the politician's criticism of many Christians during a Tuesday prayer breakfast. Mr. Obama underlined that "on Easter, I do reflect on the fact that as a Christian, I am supposed to love. And I have to say that sometimes, when I listen to less-than-loving expressions by Christians, I get concerned."


How’s this for timing? The Washington Post’s Valerie Strauss, on the two-year-anniversary of the FRC shooting, launched its own attack on FRC – with the help of a study released by the Southern Poverty Law Center, the same group that inspired that shooter. 

Here’s a quick recap: on August 15, 2012, a gunman entered the lobby of the Family Research Council in Washington D.C, planning to kill everyone inside the building and then smear Chick-Fil-A sandwiches in their faces (at the time, Chick-Fil-A was under fire for comments that its CEO, Dan Cathy, had made in support of traditional marriage). The gunman’s plot was only foiled by the quick thinking of the building manager, Leo Johnson, who ended up taking a bullet in the arm in the process. 


One of the big steps in winning a social or political battle these days is defining the terms to be used in the debate. Remember how an “unborn child” became an antiseptic “fetus” during the start of the abortion debate? And how left-wingers now call themselves “progressives” since George H. W. Bush turned “liberal” into a slur during his 1988 presidential campaign?

According to a Thursday post by Daily Beast Washington reporter Michelle Cottle, the latest example of this principle is the Family Research Council's use of the phrase “natural marriage” instead of “traditional marriage,” a move to change the terms of the debate because the conservative organization had been “getting its butt kicked.”


In 2007, Senator David Vitter was implicated in a prostitution ring involving the infamous “D.C. Madam.” Since then the senator apologized to his wife and family as well as the citizens of Louisiana, who, apparently, forgave him, as attested to their reelecting him to the U.S. Senate.

But that didn’t stop The Times-Picayune from publishing a story recently which selectively quoted from Family Research Council president Tony Perkins --  himself a former Republican member of the Louisiana House of Representatives -- in such a way as to suggest that the "far right" -- their words -- social conservative leader was opposed to Vitter's candidacy.


Religious freedom is under attack – first and foremost in the United States military – according to The Family Research Council, a Christian conservative non-profit dedicated to advancing and protecting “Faith, Family and Freedom.”

During a broad-ranging interview with MRC Vice President for Business and Culture Dan Gainor, Family Research Council President Tony Perkins asserted that, “This administration is on a search and destroy mission as it pertains to religious freedom in our nation’s military.”


It’s been said that facts are stubborn things. True enough, but that doesn’t daunt the “journalists” at The Washington Post. Faced with uncomfortable information, those intrepid truth-tellers … ignore it.

That’s what Sean Sullivan and Scott Clement did writing on the Post’s overtly liberal “The Fix” blog. On Nov. 26, the day the Supreme Court agreed to hear Hobby Lobby’s suit against Obamacare’s contraception mandate, the two asserted that “most Americans like contraceptive mandate for businesses.” Sullivan and Clement wrote, “based on the data we have seen, the public, for what it’s worth, doesn’t seem to think private companies should be exempted.”


Floyd Corkins Jr. pleaded guilty on Wednesday to wounding a security guard at the Washington headquarters of the Family Research Council, a conservative Christian lobbying group fighting against gay marriage, on August 15 last year. Corkins was carrying 15 Chick-fil-A sandwiches at the time – the restaurant chain noteworthy for its public, Christian-based opposition to gay marriage – and intended to rub the sandwiches in his victims' faces.

The New York Times made do with a brief from Reuters that did not mention a vital angle: That FRC was brought to the attention of Corkins via the website of the left-wing Southern Poverty Law Center, which has labeled FRC a "hate group."


It was huge news. A map targeting those with opposing viewpoints led to a tragic attack. Partisan rhetoric was out of control and fringe-types were being driven to gun commit gun crimes. Except that, in the case of the Gabby Giffords shooting two years ago, none of those things were even remotely true. But that didn’t stop the media from breathlessly conjecturing that a target-festooned map on Sarah Palin’s website had pointed Jared Loughner to Rep. Giffords, and that Palin’s “reload” rhetoric made him shoot.

But now we have a case in which a politically motivated shooter has confessed to choosing his targets according to a map. In fact, it was a “hate map” created by the left-wing Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC). But ABC, CBS, NBC, and CNN aren’t talking.


After a man shot a security guard at the Family Research Council (FRC) last summer, the organization claimed it was targeted because the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) listed it as a "hate group."

The shooter has now revealed that he indeed used that SPLC map to find his target. And CNN has not only promoted this list of "hate groups" in the past, but after the shooting it re-affirmed the FRC's place on the list as "hate spewing hate."