By Tom Johnson | July 25, 2016 | 11:40 PM EDT

One of NewsBusters’ most prominent readers, Rush Limbaugh, gave us a shout-out Monday during his radio program as he reflected on his success and longevity (next Monday, The Rush Limbaugh Show marks its 28th anniversary in national syndication). Limbaugh discussed a Sunday NB post which centered on a Washington Monthly blogger’s allegations that he has left a “sick stain” and a “loathsome legacy,” and that he has “removed all traces of logic, reason, decency, civility and compassion from the party of Abraham Lincoln.” In citing our post, Rush called NewsBusters “one of our favorite websites…part of the show prep” before commenting on the origins of his show as well as on blogger D. R. Tucker’s invective.

By Tom Johnson | July 24, 2016 | 5:36 PM EDT

Paul Krugman claimed recently that the Republican party “went over the edge…when supply-side economics became [its] official doctrine.” The Washington Monthly’s D.R. Tucker reveres Krugman, but he has a different choice for “the moment when the GOP truly lost it”: August 1, 1988, when Rush Limbaugh’s radio show went national. Tucker argued that Limbaugh has "removed all traces of logic, reason, decency, civility and compassion from the party of Abraham Lincoln."

By the sheer size of his audience, many millions of Americans have disagreed, answering "Yes" to Time magazine's question on the cover in 1995: "Is Rush Limbaugh Good for America?" Of course liberals say no.

By Tim Graham | July 20, 2016 | 5:11 PM EDT

The one-time ABC Sunday hosting duo of Sam Donaldson and Cokie Roberts appeared together on Tuesday morning on NPR's Morning Edition to discuss convention history. Roberts is still an NPR analyst. They began with the 1964 GOP convention, and Donaldson said "I think this was the first convention of the modern Republican hard-right conservatism." Roberts said "Absolutely right," noting "Nelson Rockefeller got booed."

Roberts said after 1964 and the passage of the Civil Rights Act, the Republican Party "became much more racist" and Donaldson joked in his usual way that Lyndon Johnson's fight for desegregation gave the South to the Republicans "forever!"

By Rich Noyes | July 17, 2016 | 8:55 AM EDT

Here's a safe prediction about this week's Republican National Convention: TV reporters will paint the GOP as too conservative, hostile to women, anathema to blacks, and an all-around turn-off to voters. And that's not just because the ever-controversial Donald Trump is set to be nominated as the party's presidential candidate. Going back to the 1988 convention, the MRC has documented how reporters act like Democratic surrogates, lecturing Republican officials and delegates about how they are too far to the right and intolerant.

By Sarah Stites | July 13, 2016 | 1:52 PM EDT

Remember how the networks obsessed over Russia’s 2014 anti-gay legislation? Turns out, the country’s newest draconian law is not worth mentioning even once. Why? This time, it’s Christians who are affected. 

By Tom Johnson | July 10, 2016 | 9:50 PM EDT

After last week’s police-involved fatal shootings in Baton Rouge and suburban St. Paul, Jeb Lund argued that such deaths happen not because of a few racist cops, but because over the past five decades millions of voters have rewarded politicians who propose and enact racist laws. In an article that appeared Thursday prior to the murder of five police officers in Dallas, Lund declared that “both parties figured out just how much of a can't-lose proposition it was to call for more cops, harsher interdiction and zero tolerance, all while finding new drugs, new addicts and new terms for low-income criminals that broadcast one general image to voters: Bad black people.”

By Tom Johnson | July 4, 2016 | 2:14 PM EDT

On June 16, four days after the Orlando nightclub massacre, Dylan Matthews tweeted his endorsement of “letting the [president of the United States] unilaterally ban people (hopefully everyone!) from buying guns.” That’s provocative, but less so than a Matthews article from this time last year that was reposted Friday. In that piece, Matthews contended, “American independence in 1776 was a monumental mistake. We should be mourning the fact that we left the United Kingdom, not cheering it...We obviously can't be entirely sure how America would have fared if it had stayed in the British Empire longer...But I'm reasonably confident a world in which the revolution never happened would be better than the one we live in now.”

By Tom Johnson | July 3, 2016 | 5:52 PM EDT

Bill Clinton’s personal conduct has exasperated liberals for roughly as long as his political success has exhilarated them. While some of them dismissed his get-together with attorney general Loretta Lynch as trivial, others saw it as yet another of his potentially damaging, impulse-driven unforced errors. Esquire’s Charles Pierce called the meeting “stupid and reckless” and fumed, “For the second presidential campaign in a row, Hillary Rodham Clinton is afflicted with a husband who can't make a political move any more without breaking the china across the room.”

By Tom Johnson | July 1, 2016 | 4:35 PM EDT

Whatever else Donald Trump is, he’s a skillful multitasker, suggested Jeet Heer in a Tuesday article. Trump is in the news mostly as a presidential candidate, of course, but Heer claims that his “real objective, win or lose, is relaunching his lucrative brand.” As for how Trump became the Republican party’s presumptive nominee even though politics wasn’t his top priority, Heer opined that there’s “something in the nature of the [GOP] and its conservative base that made them particularly vulnerable to Trump’s deceptions.”

In 1993, a Washington Post reporter wrote that the Christian right was “largely poor, uneducated, and easy to command.” Heer seems to believe that “uneducated” and “easy to command” describe enough of today’s conservatives, Christian or otherwise, to explain Trump’s popularity: "The anti-intellectualism that has been a mainstay of the conservative movement for decades also makes its members easy marks. After all, if you are taught to believe that the reigning scientific consensuses on evolution and climate change are lies, then you will lack the elementary logical skills that will set your alarm bells ringing when you hear a flim-flam artist like Trump."

By Rich Noyes | June 29, 2016 | 10:12 AM EDT

The liberal media establishment has spent the past 25 years celebrating Clinton as an “icon of American woman-hood,” while fiercely attacking those who would challenge her ethics. Far from impeding Hillary Clinton’s career with hostile coverage, the establishment media have enabled her political rise with what amounts to a 25-year-long infomercial on her behalf: admiring testimonials about her greatness, and nasty slams against her critics.

By Tom Johnson | June 27, 2016 | 9:18 PM EDT

When citing instances of “the worst in human behavior,” reasonable choices include the Holocaust, the Rwandan genocide, and whatever ISIS did today. In a Sunday post, Washington Monthly blogger D. R. Tucker offered an absurdly unreasonable choice: the last ten Republican national conventions. Tucker did comment hopefully that “perhaps this year’s GOP convention will be so sick, so sordid, so sour that the general election will effectively be over by the end of July.”

 

By Melissa Mullins | June 25, 2016 | 6:58 AM EDT

The Washington Post is already working on crafting Obama’s presidential legacy story once he leaves office next January – and it isn’t just any legacy they are attributing to him – it’s an “unusual” legacy. Why?  Well, The Post certainly couldn’t use Obama Care which was shoved down the throats of Americans and far exceeded projected costs.  They couldn’t use the issue of Immigration that Obama so passionately ran on during his campaign – especially after it was just smacked down by the Supreme Court earlier this week.  No – Obama’s “unusual” legacy was being “a good dad,” something that had nothing to do with his presidency.