By Hans Bader | January 30, 2017 | 4:42 PM EST

Media coverage of protests is so ideologically biased as to deceive the public.  Tea Party protests were law-abiding, and so orderly that they usually left no trash behind (unlike the recent Women’s March in Washington, or attendees of the 2009 Obama inauguration, who left behind lots of trash). 

 

By Tom Johnson | January 22, 2017 | 8:14 PM EST

“The most important development of the last half-century in American politics,” believes New York magazine’s Chait, is “the Republican Party’s embrace of movement conservative ideology.” In a Thursday post, Chait cited six books, none of which was written by a conservative, that “help elucidate” this phenomenon. Among Chait’s choices: E.J. Dionne’s Why the Right Went Wrong; Richard Hofstadter’s Social Darwinism in American Thought (“scathingly dispatches a powerful right-wing idea that was destined to endure: the notion that the free market is a perfectly just mechanism for rewarding value and punishing failure”); and Paul Krugman’s Peddling Prosperity (“a powerful critique of supply-side economics…which Krugman aptly dispatches as simply crankery lacking any grounding in serious economic theory”).

By Tom Blumer | December 23, 2016 | 2:26 PM EST

Fox News's Juan Williams apparently had a very bad Thursday morning on Twitter (readers will see why shortly), but out of respect for Kellyanne Conway's wishes seen in the video which follows the jump, I have resisted inspecting the carnage.

Williams reacted to the news that President-Elect Trump has appointed Conway as Counselor to the President by, in Fox Business host Maria Bartiromo's words, "questioning, well, Kellyanne has four kids, how is she going to do it?" Conway's three-pronged response to Bartiromo, with two prongs quite sharpened, neither towards Williams, will be seen in that video.

By Curtis Houck | December 7, 2016 | 3:36 PM EST

Washington Post local columnist Petula Dvorak waded into the ginned-up fake news debate in her Tuesday column as she compared the false and unsubstantiated Pizzagate story to the “doctored” and “gotcha” videos that spawned the Planned Parenthood scandal and Sarah Palin causing then-Congresswoman Gabby Giffords to be shot in 2011 (even though the first case was real and the second was thoroughly debunked). 

By Kristine Marsh | December 1, 2016 | 10:42 AM EST

ABC commentator Cokie Roberts rudely dismissed former Governor of Alaska and John McCain running-mate Sarah Palin as “a laughingstock” on Thursday’s Good Morning America. Discussing rumors that Donald Trump is considering Palin for Secretary of Veterans Affairs, anchor Robin Roberts brought in longtime journalist Cokie Roberts to get her thoughts on the potential pick. Cokie was dismissive from the start, bashing Palin as a joke and predicting she would be a problem in Congress.

By Clay Waters | November 8, 2016 | 4:36 PM EST

The lead story in the New York Times Election Day, “At Election’s End, A Sunny Tone Meets Dark” was penned by reporter Michael Barbaro, last seen composing a loving vignette of a joyous Hillary Clinton dancing in the rain. Meanwhile, Matt Flegenheimer suggested Sarah Palin and the Tea Party were to blame for the campaign’s dark tone, and even blamed conservative critics of the news media indirectly for alleged death wishes against Obama and Hillary Clinton shouted at GOP campaign rallies

By Curtis Houck | October 20, 2016 | 2:24 AM EDT

Three of the late-night comedy programs went live to react to Wednesday’s final presidential debate and the assembled hosts and guests offered vulgar jokes comparing Donald Trump to a sex toy, phone sex operator, and man who needs breast feeding while dubbing Trump debate guest “Sarah Palin is the HPV of American politics.”

By Scott Whitlock | October 5, 2016 | 1:32 PM EDT

In the final minutes before Tuesday night’s vice presidential debate, MSNBC journalists did what you would expect from the liberal network: They mocked Sarah Palin. Killing time before Tim Kaine and Mike Pence took the stage, ex-Palin aides Steve Schmidt and Nicolle Wallace regaled their left-wing hosts with behind the scenes stories from the 2008 debate prep. Wallace recounted, “She in rehearsal kept saying, ‘Senator O Biden.’ So she kept botching the name. And she was so nervous.” 

By Kyle Drennen | September 30, 2016 | 12:30 PM EDT

On Friday’s NBC Today, co-host Matt Lauer excitedly proclaimed: “Anticipation already running high for tomorrow’s season premiere of Saturday Night Live when the show announced that Alec Baldwin will be playing Donald Trump.” Fellow co-host Savannah Guthrie chimed in: “That put the anticipation into the stratosphere.” She then wondered: “We think there will be laughs, but will it actually have an impact on the election?”

By Brad Wilmouth | September 29, 2016 | 8:19 PM EDT

On Thursday's Good Morning America, ABC co-anchor Amy Robach excitedly previewed the season premiere of NBC's Saturday Night Live which is expected to have fun with the first presidential debate. But, as she recalled politicians from the past that the show has been famous for lambasting, she only cited Republicans as being among her favorites.

By Randy Hall | September 28, 2016 | 5:23 PM EDT

The British Broadcasting Corporation announced on Monday that former MSNBC host Martin Bashir has been hired to serve as the network's new religious affairs correspondent. The news release referred to Bashir as an “award-winning journalist” who has conducted “high-profile interviews" as well as “making ground-breaking, landmark documentaries.”

Of course, there was no mention of the incident during November of 2013, when he made a disgraceful rant regarding former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin, whom he called “America’s resident dunce” and claimed she has a “deceased mind.” He then went so far as to suggest that someone should defecate in her mouth and urinate in her eyes.

By Tom Johnson | September 28, 2016 | 3:13 PM EDT

According to one left-of-center blogger and one right-of-center professor, a major takeaway from the 2016 presidential contest is that ideological conservatism is unpopular, even in the Republican party. Samuel Goldman, a political-science prof at the George Washington University and a frequent contributor to The American Conservative, stated that the “great message” of Donald Trump’s campaign “is that there really are not that many movement conservatives” in the sense of average Americans “who are vested in a conventional combination of limited government, a relatively hawkish foreign policy, and a sort of religiously inflected public morality.” From the left, The Washington Monthly’s Martin Longman alleged that for most Republicans, policy ideas take a back seat to raw resentment: “‘Small government’ and ‘local control’ and ‘free enterprise’ and the rest of the GOP’s ideological playbook simply never had much appeal to their base except as signifiers for Trumpian impulses to smash outsiders and oddballs and anyone who discomforts them.”