Season Two of Comedy Central’s Legends of Chamberlain Heights kicked off its first episode titled “The G-Word” Sunday night. G stands for gentrification and the hood isn’t happy about it. Along the way, hipsters and the intrusion of CNN’s Don Lemon are solidly mocked.


Tonight (Monday), CBS-affiliated Showtime begins The Putin Interviews, a four-night series of interview excerpts with Russian President Vladimir Putin, conducted by far-left film maker Oliver Stone who, judging by a previous series on Showtime, has an affinity for KGB-connected strongmen.


Last Friday, former First Lady Michelle Obama blasted Trump and Republicans for trying to roll back her healthy school lunch program, accusing them of not caring about kids. “What is wrong with you?” Obama provocatively asked her left-leaning audience. Well Joy Behar on Monday’s The View had the same question to ask Republicans, adding in a little Ronald Reagan bashing and Michael Moore praising to make her rants extra nauseating and eye roll-worthy.


The controversial Netflix series Dear White People was finally released on Friday, April 28, and let me tell you, the "dear" in the title is NOT a term of endearment. In fact, to quote one of the show's writers, F*** White People would probably have been more appropriate, with cops and Republicans being singled out for particular hatred.


The headline in the March 5, 1929 edition of the Chicago Tribune read, "Plain Citizen Coolidge Shuts Desk and Quietly Goes Home." Calvin Coolidge would write a newspaper column from Northampton, Massachusetts, for which he presumably was paid a pittance, but other than that he refused to exploit his notoriety or accomplishments as president for money.


The story is a revealing look inside the liberal media bubble. Over here at Politico is this headline “The Strange Psychological Power of ‘Fox & Friends.’” But it’s the sub-headline that provides the real look inside both the liberal media bubble and the left-wing mind. That would read: “Unrelenting positivity has a powerful warping effect on your thinking. So how is that affecting Viewer No. 1?”


It's something most conservatives a year ago would not have imagined: the opening act of Donald Trump’s agenda in the White House contains a real whiff of Ronald Reagan. To be sure, there's plenty the Reaganites won't like -- talk of trillion-dollar federal building campaigns, taxing business at the border, etc. -- but there's plenty to applaud as well.​ Historian Craig Shirley has written another book on Reagan's political career, and he might have some thoughts on what Trump can do to succeed.


The sixth season premiere of HBO’s Veep aired Sunday, April 16th and, as much as the liberal critics want us to think it is a brilliant and timely show, it felt like all the other seasons. In the episode “Omaha,” former President (for a year) Selena Meyer (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) has spent a year recovering from a losing presidential campaign and is now hot on the trail for paid speaking gigs. Sound familiar?


Esquire’s Charles Pierce is accusing President Trump of adding to something he vowed to subtract from. In a Thursday post, Pierce called the White House’s proposed federal budget a “vast, noxious swamp into which all those tributaries of modern conservative thought have emptied themselves. People die in there, swallowed up in deep sinkholes of empowered bigotry and class anger.”


After giving President Ronald Reagan a subtle nod this earlier week, ABC decided to more directly address his presidency two days later on their hit comedy Last Man Standing.


For the second time this season, President Kirkman on ABC’s Designated Survivor has been compared to President Ronald Reagan. On Wednesday's episode, "Warriors," Kirkman is recovering from a sniper assassination attempt. After learning both the country and stock market are in a panic, he is determined to restore their confidence and does so by waving to the public from his hospital room window.


The penultimate fifth season of The Americans debuts at 10 PM EST/PST tonight (Tuesday) on FX. As I’ve written before, while the FX series humanizes undercover KGB operatives working in the U.S. on behalf of the Soviet Union, the show also illustrates the ruthlessness of Soviet communism and how the American Left in the 1980s helped advance Soviet interests.