Here's why people hate the liberal tilt of public broadcasting. Both PBS and NPR buried the Scalise shooting in their "week in review" segments. When the PBS NewsHour arrived there, anchor Judy Woodruff couldn't even mention the shooter was a Bernie Sanders campaign volunteer, couldn't mention his favorite TV shows, and couldn't ponder if anyone on the Left could have provoked him with their outrageous statements. Instead, liberal analyst Mark Shields blamed it on Newt Gingrich, and his "clone" Donald Trump: 


On Thursday's CBS Evening News, as Nancy Cordes filed a report with the latest on the aftermath of the Steve Scalise shooting, the CBS correspondent made a point of highlighting Democratic criticisms of Republicans New Gingrich and New York Rep. Chris Collins for complaining about "hostility" and "rhetoric" coming from the far left. Cordes notably did not mention that Rep. Collins had already decided to retract his comments as he feared they were not appropriate in the aftermath of the violence.


Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich appeared on Tuesday’s The View where he was grilled by the panel on Comey, the media and Trump. The liberal hosts constantly tried to pin him in a corner but Gingrich kept his cool, even after the hosts denied basic facts regarding Clinton’s email investigation. Finally the interview ended with host Whoopi Goldberg making a ridiculous assertion, based on absolutely nothing, about Trump’s relationship with the media.


Personal anecdotes suddenly matter to the left when talking about health care. After late night comedian Jimmy Kimmel went on an emotional rant last week for his sick child over the GOP’s health care bill provisions, the media rewarded him with gushy praise over the “brave” admission, using it as a launch pad to attack Republicans with for getting rid of ObamaCare. Well Monday night Kimmel was back at it again, this time personally targeting specific Republicans and conservative outlets over their criticism of his sob story’s appeal to emotion over hard facts.


The front of Thursday’s New York Times featured more wishful thinking on the part of the paper, which is still waiting for that off-year anti-Trump electoral surge: “Atlanta’s Suburbs Wonder if Newcomers Will Turn Them Blue.” Fausset threw some old, extraneous accusations of racism into the bargain, while emphasizing alleged conservative intolerance of liberals (in a world where the evidence of political intolerance is weighted in the other direction).


Esquire’s Charles Pierce is accusing President Trump of adding to something he vowed to subtract from. In a Thursday post, Pierce called the White House’s proposed federal budget a “vast, noxious swamp into which all those tributaries of modern conservative thought have emptied themselves. People die in there, swallowed up in deep sinkholes of empowered bigotry and class anger.”


The arts and literature pages offer no respite from the New York Times political thrust. Lisa Birnbach hung out with actor Mark Ruffalo, perhaps best known for his role as The Hulk in the series of Avengers superhero movies, for her front-page Arts story, “The Actor’s Activist, Onstage.” Ruffalo is participating in a politicized revival of Arthur Miller’s obscure anti-capitalism play “The Price,” and Birnbaum indulged the actor’s love of Bernie Sanders, John Kerry, and left-wing protests. Meanwhile, Sunday book reviewers found ominous parallels to Stalin and the Red Scare in Trump's America.


How is Donald Trump “not a normal Republican”? Let New York magazine’s Jonathan Chait count the ways. Trump is “crudely ethno-nationalist,” wrote Chait in a Tuesday post, and he’s “personally ignorant and undisciplined in a manner that sets him apart not only from traditional Republicans but most human adults.” That’s pretty much it for Trump’s deviations from orthodoxy, according to Chait, who thinks current White House economic and fiscal proposals are “perfectly orthodox” by party standards, notwithstanding blasts at them from GOP-aligned sources such as National Review.


With Election Day just two days away, both ABC and NBC seemingly continued to try to slow Hillary Clinton’s descent in the polls, Sunday, by downplaying all the talk surrounding multiple FBI investigations into her activities. On ABC's This Week, Clinton lackey George Stephanopoulos tried to shutdown such talk from Republican Party Chairman Reince Priebus by flippantly declaring, “You're just throwing out a lot of words there.” 


NPR’s media correspondent David Folkenflik loves to report negative stories about Fox News, over and over again. Since July 6, he’s filed 16 negative reports on Fox News and the sexual-harassment lawsuits, leading to the departure of longtime boss Roger Ailes.

The least surprising story on Wednesday night’s All Things Considered was Folkenflik enjoying the Tuesday night Fox News fight between Megyn Kelly and Newt Gingrich. Like the other leftists, Folkenflik took the side of Kelly, scorning Gingrich as a finger-wagging old man losing voters for Trump.


The “Big Three” networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) found yet another topic to distract themselves from talking about issues damaging to Democrats Wednesday evening. “Trump's message today, overshadowed by the man in the front row,” explained ABC’s Tom Llamas on World News Tonight, “Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, fresh off his explosive interview with Megyn Kelly.” According to the nets the argument was more important than corruption, leaked e-mails, or videos showing admission to federal crimes. 


Wednesday, ABC had a field day talking about the fiery exchange between Newt Gingrich and Megyn Kelly on FNC’s The Kelly File Tuesday night. Anchors David Muir and Robin Roberts joined analysts Matthew Dowd and Jon Karl to trash Gingrich for badgering Kelly about the Clintons’ scandals. Muir asked what the Trump team “has to gain by taking on Megyn Kelly,” before the panel argued this would only hurt Trump more with women voters. Dowd then claimed Gingrich appeared to have lost his mind, while Karl added that bringing up Bill Clinton’s sex scandals was a distraction for the Trump campaign.