By Sarah Stites | January 17, 2017 | 3:46 PM EST

If any black entertainers perform at the inauguration, they’ll have rapper Snoop Dogg to deal with. And from the sound of things, it won’t be pretty.

By Curtis Houck | December 1, 2016 | 3:07 PM EST

CBS’s Late Show host Stephen Colbert took another turn into the gutter on Wednesday night to the glee of his liberal audience as he joked that Mitt Romney consuming frog legs while having dinner the evening prior with President-elect Donald Trump “taste[d] a little bit like Trump's balls” and so began a brief rift joking Romney had performed oral sex on Trump.

By Nicholas Fondacaro | November 20, 2016 | 10:24 AM EST

As President-Elect Donald Trump’s cabinet selection process continued move along Sunday morning, the liberal media’s claims of chaos behind the scenes seemed to give way to cries of racism on the network morning shows. “So, there's a concern about lack of diversity so far in the hiring,” bemoaned ABC’s Paula Faris on Good Morning America, “We saw that he brought in Michelle Rhee and Nikki Haley, but is there really any likelihood of a pick who is not a white male at this point?”

By Tom Blumer | November 13, 2016 | 11:23 PM EST

Considering that it's coming from the New York Times, reporter Sabrina Tavernise's account of what happened in Ohio to swing it from a close Obama win in 2012 to a near-blowout for Donald Trump in 2016 was reasonably well-done, but still had glaring flaws. Her story's human interest elements were strong, but the accompanying statistics provided were sparse, and really needed to be there to tell the full tale. Tavernise's biggest failures were first, not describing how historically large Trump's Buckeye State victory margin was, and second, neglecting to attribute a large portion of that margin to sharply lower overall turnout among Democrats. Those two elements enabled her to avoid entertaining the possibility that Ohio — but to be clear, not necessarily the rest of the nation, or even the Midwest — may have just experienced a potentially seismic electoral realignment.

By Brad Wilmouth | November 6, 2016 | 3:14 PM EST

Appearing as a guest on Sunday's PoliticsNation, MSNBC political analyst and Daily Beast columnist Jonathan Alter was busy scaremongering to get anti-Donald Trump voters to the polls, as he asserted that "the well-being of millions of citizens" is "on the ballot," and worried that there would be a "constitutional crisis" if Trump won the popular vote while losing the Electoral College: "Look, I'm normally a calm guy -- you know this -- but this is really serious."

By Brad Wilmouth | November 5, 2016 | 11:53 PM EDT

On Friday's Real Time on HBO, far left host Bill Maher seemed to be in a panic over the possibility that Donald Trump will be elected President, as he repeatedly hit on his worries that there is a "slow-moving, right-wing coup" that will bring to power a "fascist" President Trump, even going so far as to invoke the Rwanda genocide of the 1990s and Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler. Maher even ended up admitting that he and other liberals "cried wolf" in their attacks on President George W. Bush and GOP candidates Mitt Romney and John McCain, calling it a "big mistake" on their part.

By Nicholas Fondacaro | October 19, 2016 | 12:51 AM EDT

As the torrent of Hillary Clinton campaign e-mails continued to pour out of WikiLeaks Tuesday, a peculiar e-mail surfaced sent from Clinton Campaign Chairman John Podesta. The e-mail discussed Clinton’s possible vice presidential choices with different blocks of candidates distinguished mainly by their race and gender, or as Podesta dubbed them, “food groups.” As offensive as such classifications would seem be, the liberal “Big Three” networks didn’t bat an eye at Clinton’s minority “food groups,” a stark contrast to their outrage at Governor Mitt Romney’s “binders of women” comment in 2012. 

By Tom Blumer | October 8, 2016 | 10:16 AM EDT

This is a volatile election year, to say the least. The two major-party candidates are far less than perfect, routinely commit gaffes (or perceived gaffes), and have been hurt by a variety of negative disclosures and actions. Two other challengers have gained a degree of attention and apparent support not seen since Ross Perot's presidential runs in the 1990s. Meanwhile, mistrust of the establishment press is at or near an all-time high, and several journalists have publicly decided that the idea of even trying (or pretending) to report in a fair and balanced manner is not appropriate this year.

By NB Staff | October 3, 2016 | 5:16 PM EDT

Media Research Center president Brent Bozell took to the airwaves of the Fox News Channel (FNC) on Monday afternoon during Your World to excoriate the liberal media for their latest double standard in harping on a New York Times story on Donald Trump’s taxes versus leaked audio of Hillary Clinton disparaging Bernie Sanders supporters.

By Tom Johnson | September 28, 2016 | 5:18 PM EDT

Unlike a lot of his fellow liberals, Jonathan Chait doesn’t believe presidential-debate moderators should be on-camera fact-checkers, but Chait’s reason for opposing the idea is unambiguously anti-conservative. In an item posted a few hours prior to Monday night’s Clinton-Trump clash, Chait argued that the way Republicans dealt with Candy Crowley’s intervention in a 2012 Romney-Obama debate “suggests the party would never tolerate such a role by the media on an ongoing basis,” given that “the GOP exists within an epistemic bubble that creates its own reality and disregards the findings of mainstream experts in economics, science, and other fields…Conservatives created this alternate ecosystem precisely to insulate their side from scrutiny from journalists who were not working within the conservative movement. And the simple reality is that, if debates become forums for media to subject candidate claims to fact-checking by the standards of independent arbiters, Republicans will refuse to participate in them.”

By Curtis Houck | September 20, 2016 | 9:11 PM EDT

With the first 2016 presidential debate approaching on Monday, a portion of Tuesday’s Hardball on MSNBC was dedicated to looking back at some iconic moments from past debates and host Chris Matthews used the time to express his sheer anger that still permeates four years later at Mitt Romney for his “terrible performance” in the first 2012 debate where he “walked in like he’s a better man” than President Obama.

By Tom Blumer | September 11, 2016 | 7:25 PM EDT

Stephanie Cutter believes that Democratic Party presidential nominee Hillary Clinton really made a mistake in her Friday evening "basket of deplorables" statement about Republican nominee Donald Trump's supporters at a fundraiser in New York City when she limited the "basket" to "half" of them. On Sunday's Meet the Press on NBC, Cutter, the former 2012 Obama presidential campaign manager and short-lived cohost of CNN's failed attempt to revive Crossfire a couple of years ago, made it clear that she believes that far more than half, and perhaps all, of Trump's supporters belong in that "deplorables" basket containing people Mrs. Clinton described as "racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic, you name it."