“Between Donald Trump and anything resembling Christianity,” there is only a great void -- a “vast, empty, and dark space,” declared gay Catholic pundit Sullivan in a Friday column for New York magazine. Sullivan described Trump as “neither religious nor irreligious. He is pre-religious. He is a pagan. He makes much more sense as a character in Game of Thrones, a medieval world bereft of the legacy of Jesus of Nazareth, than as a president of a modern, Western country...I will never understand how more than half of white Catholics could vote for such a man, or how the leadership of the church could be so terribly silent when such a monster stalks the earth.”


I have a new book out -- "The True Jesus," which is my third Christian-themed book -- and I want to tell you a little bit about it. In my previous books, I related that I didn't always embrace the Bible and that I came to accept Jesus Christ later than some people do -- after studying the evidence for Christianity's truth claims. Contrary to a common misconception, there is an abundance of evidence that undergirds the Christian faith, and I examined much of that in my previous books.


Family Guy is no stranger to bashing Christianity and Sunday night’s Christmas episode on Fox, “How the Griffin Stole Christmas” was no exception, featuring Jesus not only mocked, but KICKED at the nativity.


As part of his weekly segment entitled “Ya Burnt” where he rifts on various topics, NBC’s Late Night host Seth Meyers found it pertinent in the early hours of Good Friday to mock Jesus Christ and Leonardo da Vinci’s depiction of the Last Supper that was so dull in the eyes of Meyers that “[n]o wonder Judas dropped a dime” on Jesus.


As we all know, MSNBC is painstakingly conscientious to avoid showing any depiction of Islam's Prophet Muhammad, out of a profession of cultural sensitivity and a desire to avoid needless offense to practicing Muslims. But when it comes to Christians who would object to taking the Lord's name in vain, well, that's a different story apparently. Witness the May 14 -- Ascension Day nonetheless! -- edition of All In with Chris Hayes.


With Christmas three days away, one liberal atheist took to the far-left website Salon to dismiss the existence of a “war on Christmas” spotlighted annually by conservatives and news pundits, led by the Fox News Channel’s (FNC) Bill O’Reilly. At the same time, however, the author seemed perfectly fine attacking Christmas himself, claiming that Jesus Christ never existed and wondered if “anyone” would “truly mourn the holiday if we did without it.”

In a piece entitled “Let’s Make Bill O’Reilly’s Head Explode: We Desperately Need a War on Christmas Lies,” Atlantic magazine contributing editor Jeffrey Tayler began by summarizing one of O’Reilly’s latest segments regarding the “war on Christmas” that discussed into a series of billboards being sponsored by the American Atheists. 


America's Christophobes have been plenty busy lately. Maybe the Christmas season makes them especially nervous.


On Wednesday night, ABC News continued to promote a new book with the “astonishing” claim that Jesus Christ married Mary Magdalene and had two children together with a flattering one-and-a-half minute segment on ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir.

Anchor David Muir began by stating that it “has sparked a fiery debate among the faithful” while ABC News chief foreign correspondent Terry Moran characterized the book’s central premise as an “astonishing and, to many, blasphemous claim” that “Jesus married Mary Magdalene and had two sons with her, is history.”


In her obituary for ordained minister-turned-agnostic Gerald A. Larue, Los Angeles Times writer Elaine Woo insisted that the 98-year-old founding president of the Hemlock Society had been "a debunker of claims such as Lazarus rising from the dead." 

But it seems Ms. Woo is confusing offering a skeptic's alternative viewpoint for discrediting the claims of the Bible.


In his first epistle to the Corinthians, St. Paul made it perfectly clear that a belief in the bodily resurrection of Christ as the sine qua non of Christianity. If Christ was not raised from the dead, that the whole of the Christian faith is an utter sham, the apostolic witness fraudulent, the basis of Christian hope nonexistent, and the poor saps who go on attempting to live a life guided by the teachings of Christ are "of all people most to be pitied."

But the editors of the Washington Post's On Faith section apparently didn't get that memo, choosing to run for their Holy Saturday edition a Religion News Service article which hyped the beliefs of liberal religious scholars like the former Episcopal Bishop of Newark, John Shelby Spong, who not only denies that Jesus was physically raised from the dead but that the Bible really, truly teaches the same if you just interpret it the way he prefers to.


Al Sharpton entered truly ludicrous territory during an appearance Wednesday on Tom Joyner’s radio show. While talking about the meaning of Easter, the Baptist minister and MSNBC host dragged President Obama into the mix:

"As I looked at President Obama at our convention last Friday, where all he took he’s been able to rise politically again, I’m not comparing him to Jesus, but I am saying that to every crucifixion there is a resurrection for those that believe." [YouTube video embedded below.]
 


In an interview with Fox News host Bill O'Reilly on Thursday's NBC Today, co-host Matt Lauer fretted over the Killing Jesus author wanting the historical life of Christ to be taught in schools: "[In] public schools these days, you go sit in one of those classes and you're surrounded by kids of four or five, six different faiths. Why should they sit there and listen to the story of Jesus Christ?" [Listen to the audio or watch the video after the jump]

O'Reilly replied: "If they are American children, because that's what forged the Constitution. And if they don't like it, that's too bad." Lauer worried: "How do you protect, though? How do you draw the line and the balance between someone who would go into a classroom, a teacher, and teach the historical story, as opposed to imposing religious beliefs?...Who enforces that?"