By Nicholas Fondacaro | March 19, 2017 | 1:33 PM EDT

Following a recent foreign policy dust-up between the White House and Britain over unfounded allegations of spying, the liberal media took it upon themselves to speculate the future of the long standing relationship. And during ABC’s This Week the network’s chief foreign correspondent, Terry Moran mocked the Trump administration and argued that all of Europe was laughing at the expense of the United States. 

By Curtis Houck | March 17, 2017 | 5:30 PM EDT

On Friday afternoon, a slew of CNN personalities could barely contain their approval with the German journalists who questioned President Trump, swooning how they exclusively stuck to the wiretapping claims and should be given “kudos” for their questions from the left. 

By Scott Whitlock | March 17, 2017 | 3:31 PM EDT

Hostile journalists sparred with Donald Trump on Friday at a press conference, wondering why he was “scared” of “diversity” in the media and if German Chancellor Angela Merkel has “reservations” about the President. Kristina Dunz of the DPA German Press Agency labeled Trump an “isolationist” and disrespectful to the European Union. She then lectured, “Why are you scared of diversity in the news, in the media that you speak so often of fake news? And that things, after all, in the end cannot be proven?” 

By Cal Thomas | December 28, 2016 | 10:47 AM EST

Recent terrorist attacks in Ankara, Turkey, and Berlin, Germany, add to a growing list of incidents that are becoming increasingly difficult to remember. Does one begin the list with the plane hijackings in the '60s and '70s, or the first World Trade Center bombing in 1993, or the USS Cole attack in 2000, or the second World Trade Center attack in 2001, or Ft. Hood, San Bernardino, Orlando, Paris or Nice? And that's not all of them, nor will it be the end of them, if we don't have a better response.

By Tom Blumer | December 22, 2016 | 2:30 PM EST

In the aftermath of Monday's Christmas market attack in Berlin which killed 12 and injured nearly 50, Geir Moulson at the Associated Press seemed to be more worried about Angela Merkel's political future than the dreadful mayhem perpetrated by the truck-driving attacker. This puts the reporter in the same camp as MSNBC's serial fabulist Brian Williams and a host of other establishment press members.

Moulson's feelings about the matter were quite apparent in one over-the-top paragraph found in the Tuesday afternoon dispatch.

By Nicholas Fondacaro | December 21, 2016 | 5:50 PM EST

In the wake of the ISIS terrorist attack in Berlin, Germany on Monday, many of the county’s right wing politicians have laid the blame at the feet of Chancellor Angela Merkel because of her lax immigration policies. On The 11th Hour Tuesday night, disgraced news anchor Brian Williams fretted for what is meant for Germany and all of Europe. “This could turn out to be the tractor-trailer that affects all of Europe and you know how,” he exclaimed to NBC News Terrorism Analyst Evan Kohlmann. 

By Nicholas Fondacaro | December 19, 2016 | 6:21 PM EST

Terrible news broke out of Berlin, Germany Monday after a truck drove through a Christmas market, killing nine people and injuring dozens, in an apparent terrorist attack. As with many horrific attacks, the partisans rushed to politicize it, but during the 3 p.m. ET hour of MSNBC Live, Juergen Kloeckner from the Huffington Post whined that the German right wing seemed to have beat the left to the punch. 

By Walter E. Williams | June 29, 2016 | 12:56 PM EDT

German Chancellor Angela Merkel declared that multiculturalism has "utterly failed," adding that it was an illusion to think Germans and foreign workers could "live happily side by side." The failure of multiculturalism is also seen in Denmark, Sweden, the United Kingdom, France, Belgium and other European countries. Immigrants coming from Africa and the Middle East refuse to assimilate and instead seek to import the failed cultures they fled.

By Brad Wilmouth | January 11, 2016 | 2:08 PM EST

Appearing as a guest on Monday's CNN Newsroom with Carol Costello, New York Times columnist and CNN political commentator Ross Douthat admitted that there can be such a thing as too much immigration as he warned of a "slow-motion disaster" in Germany because of Chancellor Angela Merkel's decision to allow a million immigrants into the country.

But when asked by host Costello to clarify the differences between Germany and America on the immigration issue, he still came down on the side of allowing more refugees from the Middle East into the U.S.

By Tom Blumer | January 11, 2016 | 10:27 AM EST

Despite reports and statements containing the term coming out of Germany during the past week, searches at the Associated Press on "no-go zones," and even on "no-go," return nothing. The New York Times has no recent report identifying European no-go zones, but has at least demonstrated that it might be getting over its nearly allergic reaction to the term by observing that parts of Ramadi, Iraq recently liberated from Islamic State control are "no-go zones because they have yet to be searched for booby traps left by the jihadists."

"No-go zones" again became news because, despite U.S. media outlets continued denial of their existence, several officials in Germany once again used the term.

By Tom Blumer | January 1, 2016 | 9:19 PM EST

The Wall Street Journal ran a blockbuster story Tuesday afternoon ("U.S. Spy Net on Israel Snares Congress") about how the Obama administration's National Security Agency's "targeting of Israeli leaders swept up the content of private conversations with U.S. lawmakers." In other words, the NSA spied on Congress. As talk-show host and commentator Erick Erickson drily observed: "Congress began impeachment proceedings on Richard Nixon for spying on the opposing political party."

Whether or not Congress has the nerve to defend itself and the Constitution's separation of powers, what the Journal reported is objectively a major story. Yet the Associated Press ignored it on Tuesday, and most of Wednesday. Finally, at 7:15 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesday, the AP ran a story by Erica Werner — about how Republicans are planning to investigate the matter.

By Tom Blumer | December 15, 2015 | 3:00 PM EST

The year isn't even over, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Time's 2015 Person of the Year, has begun to act against the primary reason why the magazine chose her.

To refresh from a NewsBusters post last week, Time's Nancy Gibbs cited three reasons for the choice. The clearly most important one, from their perspective, was Merkel's virtually unilateral decision that Germany "would welcome refugees as casualties of radical Islamist savagery, not carriers of it" without apparent restriction. Now Merkel has, as described by a writer at Time Inc. sister publication Fortune, "backpedaled" from that stance.