By Tom Blumer | March 27, 2017 | 1:01 AM EDT

Scott Adams, the Dilbert cartoonist who has been portraying life in the office cubicle for over three decades, spotted the Donald Trump phenomenon early on, wrote that "I have never seen better" persuasion skills, and ultimately predicted that Trump would win the presidency. Bloomberg Businessweek's Caroline Winter, apparently originally believing like so many others that Adams would be proven decisively wrong and that she could punish him quickly for his errancy after the results came in, interviewed Adams a week before Election Day. When Bloomberg finally published her hit piece early Wednesday morning, it took Adams less than half a day to rip her "fake news" to shreds.

By Tom Blumer | March 26, 2017 | 6:30 PM EDT

When a wolf pack sends out one of its members to kill, is it really a "lone-wolf" attack? Hardly. But that's the mythology to which Sudip Kar-Gupta at Reuters was clinging on Thursday in covering the view of the attacks from France.

By Tom Blumer | March 22, 2017 | 6:25 PM EDT

One would hope that the Washington Post, where the news masthead is "Democracy Dies in Darkness," and whose emails soliciting subscriptions tell recipients that "Democracy needs great journalism," searched far and wide for the most credible person they could possibly find to criticize the foreign-policy impact of how the Trump administration "twists the truth." Apparently, the best person they could find for the job was ... Susan Rice?

By Tom Blumer | March 22, 2017 | 1:00 AM EDT

Early Tuesday evening, Curtis Houck at NewsBusters noted that the rape of a 14 year-old girl at a Maryland high school by two older teens (17 and 18) who recently arrived the U.S. was the subject of a question at Trump Press Secretary Sean Spicer's press conference earlier that day. The Washington Post's first story on the rape Friday illustrates Houck's observation that the crime is "an inconvenient story for their liberal narrative" that one must downplay or simply not report negative news about the actions of illegal immigrants.

By Tom Blumer | March 20, 2017 | 11:33 AM EDT

In early February, Meetup.com, a site which until late January was all about "bring(ing) people together in thousands of cities to do more of what they want to do in life" by helping people subscribe to common interest groups and organize meetings, joined "the resistance." On Sunday, Steve Peoples at the Associated Press spent 14 paragraphs treating the moves as a brand-new effort, leaving only readers who get to his 15th paragraph to wonder about the financial impact thus far of the company's abandonment of all pretenses of neutrality.

By Tom Blumer | March 20, 2017 | 8:15 AM EDT

On Saturday, Harvard law professor, lifelong Democrat and dogged Bill Clinton defender during the late-1990s Monica Lewinsky saga Alan Dershowitz was interviewed on Fox & Friends about U.S. Court rulings in Hawaii and Maryland halting enforcement of the Trump administration's revised temporary travel ban against six countries. Dershowitz, who strongly disagrees with the judges' rulings, made a point which the press has almost uniformly failed to note, and which echoes something I am told the State of Hawaii's Attorney General openly admitted during his court arguments, namely that if former President Barack Obama had issued the exact same order during his administration, it would have been upheld, or even litigated. But because it was Donald Trump's order, it was halted.

By Tom Blumer | March 19, 2017 | 1:31 PM EDT

If a federal judge allowed a lawsuit to proceed alleging that police led participants in a far-left protest rally into a gauntlet of violence-prone right-wing counter-demonstrators, and that several protesters were pummeled and hurt as a result, it would be nationally prominent news. But the national establishment press, and the California press outside of the San Francisco Bay area, have just demonstrated that when the political affiliations of those involved are different, it's not news, even when the aggrieved protesters win a significant court victory affirming their depiction of events.

By Tom Blumer | March 16, 2017 | 8:15 PM EDT

On Tuesday, Tucker Carlson opened his Fox News show by reviewing the "evidence," after months of allegations and bitter left-leaning cable news hysteria, that Russia conspired, perhaps with now-President Donald Trump's help, to engineer the Republican's November presidential win — by, in short, asserting that "there's no reason to believe that Russia changed the course of American political history." Then, after savagely indicting NBC News for its obvious attempt to tip the scales in Hillary Clinton's favor by releasing the Access Hollywood Trump tape to the Washington Post two days before the second presidential debate, Carlson asked a far more important question: "What do you think played a bigger role in the 2016 race: The Access Hollywood tape or the Russian government." Answer: "That's an obvious one."

By Tom Blumer | March 15, 2017 | 8:53 AM EDT

Donald Trump-directed assassination chic has hit a critical, and apparently critically accepted, mass. Middle-aged, extremely wealthy misogynist rap "artist" Snoop Dogg, a pioneer in the genre who has millions of followers, has produced a video which portrays President Trump as a pot smoking clown whom Snoop Dogg "shoots" while saying, "One shot, one kill."

By Tom Blumer | March 14, 2017 | 4:17 PM EDT

The outcome of the Michael Brown saga in Ferguson, Missouri, which began in August 2014, reached a climax in November 2014 when a grand jury did not indict police officer Darren Wilson, and ended with a whimper in March 2015 when the Justice Department saw no basis for bringing civil rights charges, infuriated the left. So it seemed inevitable that a conspiracy theory would emerge attempting to rehabilitate Brown's reputation while planting doubt about the circumstances leading to his death — and one just has.

By Tom Blumer | March 11, 2017 | 8:35 PM EST

In a dispatch accusing the Trump administration of hypocrisy in expressing pleasure over Friday's jobs report from the government's Bureau of Labor Statistics, Associated Press reporters Jill Colvin and Christopher Rugaber, with additional assistance from Jonathan Lemire, either betrayed an amazing collective level of ignorance about what a households is, or were so blinded by the need to criticize Donald Trump that they didn't see how ridiculous they made themselves and their wire service look. The trio's error, shared by their editors if such people even exist any more, is so obvious that one simply has to believe that it's the latter.

By Tom Blumer | March 9, 2017 | 10:53 PM EST

On CNN's first airing of Believer, a six-part Sunday evening series described at People.com as a "spiritual adventures series" exploring "the world’s most fascinating faith-based groups," host Reza Aslan did his part to take the network's flagging reputation down even further as he (yes, really) ate part of a human brain. Aslan, who was visiting a fringe, cannibalistic sect which claims to be part of the Hindu faith, says that he made it clear to viewers and online followers that the Aghori sect is "not representative of Hinduism,” but didn't address the real question, which is why he chose to feature it anyway.