Until I read Wednesday evening's dispatch from the Associated Press by Deb Riechmann and Richard Lardner, I had no idea that the secretaries of state and boards of election throughout the land had surrendered their roles in compiling election results to the Associated Press. Now I know better. In a report which primarily concerned former Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson's appearance earlier that day before the House Intelligence Committee, the AP buried news that the Democratic National Committee had refused DHS's help after its systems were allegedly hacked, but also told readers that prior to Election Day, Johnson "contacted The Associated Press, which counts votes."


On Thursday, the Associated Press played up the supposed impact of President Donald Trump's decision to the withdraw from the Paris climate accord by underlining that "some island states may not survive through the next 100 years." The wire service touted officials from some of these countries, along with several "experts," who predicted "catastrophic" effects on these nations.


On Wednesday morning, White House press secretary Sean Spicer gave an interview to rumored replacement and conservative talk radio host Laura Ingraham and lambasted the opposition party that he faces at the Briefing Room podium as wannabe “YouTube stars” thirsting for “getting their clip on air” tussling with Spicer.


It only took four sentences for Bill Barrow and Kathleen Foody at the Associated Press to serve up a howler in their attempt to minimize the national significance of Republican Karen Handel's victory over Democrat Jon Ossoff in Tuesday evening's Sixth District congressional election in Georgia. Their report's fourth sentence claimed that the winner's victory speech "thank you to Trump was Handel's most public show of support of the man who wasn't embraced by many voters in the well-educated suburban Atlanta district in November." That's utter nonsense, as the AP pair essentially admitted two times much later in their dispatch.


Otto Warmbier, the 22-year-old student from Wyoming, Ohio and the University of Virginia who was returned to his family in a coma last week after being imprisoned in North Korea for over a year, died on Monday. Tuesday morning, the Associated Press and "experts" it consulted somehow found the communist nation's treatment of Warmbier "one of the more perplexing and heart-rending developments in North Korea's long, antagonistic standoff with its neighbors and Washington." A reading of AP's "analysis" indicates that it's fair to claim that restrictions North Korea has placed on the wire service in return for its presence there have pervasively affected the credibility of all of its reporting from and even about that country.


Saturday evening, Eric Tucker and Erica Werner at the Associated Press were clearly determined to tell readers as little as they possibly could about the list of GOP lawmakers' names found on James Hodgkinson after he was killed trying to assassinate several congressmen and others present at a baseball practice in Alexandria, Virginia on Wednesday. In doing so, the AP pair failed to disclose details already reported by several media outlets.


Late last week, the Associated Press attempted to troll President Donald Trump by claiming that his decision to withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord "may speed up" damage to his organizations' properties in Florida and other low-lying areas because of a "climate change"-driven acceleration in rising sea levels — by 2100. At the Weather Channel's Weather.com Friday evening, writer Pam Wright seemed to relish that prospect, and presented it as if it's far more than a possibility.


In remarks so bizarre and out of touch that satirists at outlets like The Onion would have rejected them if someone had suggested their inclusion in a made-up story, London's police chief has described the diversity of the city's London Bridge terror attack victims and witnesses interviewed as positive things. Gregory Katz at the Associated Press did his part to play along with the charade by failing to identify the lack of diversity among those who carried out the attack.


The idea that reporting the facts about terror attacks encourages more terrorism — an idea ridiculously advanced by the likes of former Secretary of State John Kerry during the Obama administration — has apparently gained some traction in the establishment press. On Tuesday, bothered by a "FOX NEWS ALERT" (in, oh my gosh, all caps) that "ISIS claims responsibility" for the hostage siege in Melbourne, Australia "that killed one person and injured three cops," Jonathan Weisman at the New York Times tweeted that such reporting is "giving the terrorists what they want," and complained that "No attack (is) too small or too far away for a big all-caps alert."


On Wednesday afternoon, the Detroit Free Press reported that "A federal prosecutor dropped a bombshell in court Wednesday, telling a federal judge that the government estimates that as many as 100 girls may have had their genitals cut at the hands of a local doctor and her cohorts" in a "historic" case involving female genital mutilation (FGM). The Associated Press inexplicably buried this obvious "bombshell" lede in the final sentence of its brief unbylined Wednesday evening dispatch, while the Free Press itself has developed a sudden and troubling reluctance to call FGM by its true name.


During Barack Obama's presidency, we were constantly assured by the administration and its press apparatchiks that deportations had greatly increased during his tenure. So it's more than a little strange that the Associated Press is now worried that because of President Donald Trump's "crackdown on illegal immigration," fewer people who are genuinely eligible for "federal food assistance" are opting out "because of the perceived risk" that parents and guardians of eligible children and dependents will be deported.


In a late Friday post, the McClatchy news service freaked out over the revelation that Republicans and right-of-center strategists are gunning to make the 2018 midterm elections a referendum on liberal media bias, contrasted with the strategy of liberals and their media allies to focus on President Trump.