On Wednesday morning, White House press secretary Sean Spicer gave an interview to rumored replacement and conservative talk radio host Laura Ingraham and lambasted the opposition party that he faces at the Briefing Room podium as wannabe “YouTube stars” thirsting for “getting their clip on air” tussling with Spicer.


There are people who appear to live in hermetically sealed bubbles, and then there's Chris Cillizza, formerly of the Washington Post but now at CNN. On the apparently safe assumption that he really thought President Donald Trump and the public would have a hard time coming up with answers, Cillizza challenged the Commander in Chief and, and in effect the Twitterverse, to "name a (news) story that is 'fake' or 'incorrect.'" A tidal wave of specific responses arrived in short order.


On the Monday edition of the Fox Business Network’s Risk and Reward, the Media Research Center’s Tim Graham annihilated CNN’s lukewarm response to Believe host Reza Aslan’s vulgar tweet attacking President Donald Trump following Saturday night’s London terror attacks. 
 


Apparently Reza Aslan, the star and executive producer of CNN's Believer documentary series is among those who haven't figured out that whatever you put out there on the Internet stays out there on the Internet. In "apologizing" for his profane, since-deleted tweet directed at President Donald Trump Saturday evening after the London terrorist attacks, Aslan claimed that "it's not like me" to respond as he did in a "derogatory fashion." Your Twitter history says otherwise, pal.


Reza Aslan, the human brain eating CNN host of Believer expressed not the slightest hint of sympathy for the victims of the June 3 terror attacks in London on Twitter. Instead he was solely animated by intense hatred of President Donald Trump to the extent that he cursed him out as you can see in the following tweet:


Late Saturday night, London fell victim to yet another terrorist attack using a motor vehicle to mow down pedestrians.  As details were first coming out, Drudge Report put out a tweet which read: “Fear of new terror attack after van ‘mows down 20 people’ on London Bride…” Soon after, President Trump retweeted the message. The retweeting didn’t sit well with NBC Nightly News, who noted on their own account that “Pres. Trump has used Twitter to share news report on London incident. We aren’t relaying president’s retweet, as the info in unconfirmed.”


Behold another sign of the apocalypse, if you’re into preparing for that sort of thing. According to the news site Axios (with help from SocialFlow), the Twitter mentions for President Trump’s infamous new typo “covfefe” were over 50 times larger on Wednesday than those involving far-left comedienne Kathy Griffin after her disturbing photo with a fake severed Trump head.

 


The controversy over Kathy Griffin holding up a bloodied severed head of Donald Trump — an action which has led to her removal from CNN's New Year's Eve programming — reportedly spilled into the President's family when TMZ reported that the Trumps' 11-year son "Barron was in front of the TV watching a show when the news came on and he saw the bloody, beheaded image." TMZ says: "We're told he panicked and screamed, 'Mommy, Mommy!'"


For much of Tuesday, the country joined in rare collective outrage at the viral image of comedian Kathy Griffin holding aloft a mock bloody severed head of President Trump. Politicos from the left and right side of the spectrum shared a sense of disgust over the image that some equated to promoting violence, while one writer for The Atlantic didn’t have a problem with it. But at roughly eight o’clock PM Eastern time, Griffin finally spoke out about the images and issued an apology. 


In a photo shoot leaked on Tuesday afternoon by TMZ, far-left lewd comedian Kathy Griffin posed with a bloodied, fake severed head of President Donald Trump in the same vein ISIS fighters would in videos showing the beheading of their prisoners.


In an attempt to build up its already bulging "We'll never really know why they did it" file relating to Islamist radicals who have taken innocent lives, three reporters at The New York Times composed a 1,900-word report Saturday evening (for Sunday's print edition) about Manchester bomber Salman Abedi's family background. The reporters provided very little hard information about Abedi's motivations, despite the fact that readers who saw the paper's tweet which promoted the article were led to expect it: "What led Salman Abedi to bomb the Manchester arena?" But they did push hard the news that Abedi called his mom before he carried the attack.


On Tuesday, Randy Hall at NewsBusters covered how "the Associated Press hired a 'freelancer' -- who turned out to be 'a hardcore left-wing activist' -- to attend a 'closed press' fund-raiser for the GOP in New Hampshire." In other words, the wire service sent Melanie Plenda to the event for the express purpose of crashing it, despite the NHGOP's clear instructions. It turns out that the Washington Post's Erik Wemple, in covering the fallout from Plenda's sneaky, sloppy work, is perfectly fine with that.