By Tim Graham | March 25, 2017 | 2:30 PM EDT

Washington Post humor columnist Gene Weingarten demonstrated how far that liberals will go to defend self-mutilation by transgenders. Troubled by a penis? Weingarten compared healthy, functional body parts to a child with a cleft palate: "This is fixable. Because a child is born with a cleft palate, it doesn't mean he needs to go through life with a cleft palate."

By Tom Johnson | March 24, 2017 | 10:21 AM EDT

According to Leah Finnegan in her Thursday piece for The New Republic, when Steve Bannon cast the mainstream media as full-fledged opponents of the Trump White House, it wasn’t an accurate statement, but it may have been the next best thing: a self-fulfilling prophecy. “What if, rather than reflexively assuming its defensive posture of ‘objectivity,’ the press embraced this opportunity to go full-offense?” wondered Finnegan, who added, “In declaring the media the ‘opposition party,’ Bannon may have actually done it [sic] a great favor, tacitly casting it as a worthy adversary to Trump’s newfound power.”

By Tom Blumer | March 23, 2017 | 7:45 PM EDT

In their March 12 coverage of the release from prison of a Jordanian man who killed seven Israeli schoolgirls 20 years ago, Washington Post reporters Ruth Eglash and Taylor Luck quoted one of the many Jordanians who consider the man a hero claiming that “Israelis kill Palestinians by the hundreds every month, and no one is brought to justice." The pair allowed that claim to go unchallenged, leaving one to wonder where this "great journalism" the paper promotes in its subscription solicitations is hiding.

By Tom Blumer | March 22, 2017 | 6:25 PM EDT

One would hope that the Washington Post, where the news masthead is "Democracy Dies in Darkness," and whose emails soliciting subscriptions tell recipients that "Democracy needs great journalism," searched far and wide for the most credible person they could possibly find to criticize the foreign-policy impact of how the Trump administration "twists the truth." Apparently, the best person they could find for the job was ... Susan Rice?

By Genevieve Wood | March 22, 2017 | 2:50 PM EDT

As a member of The Daily Signal team, I took offense to The Washington Post’s recent questioning of our “legitimacy” as a news organization. The Washington Post began its story stating that, “In an age of partisan media, the lines between ‘partisan’ and ‘media’ can sometimes blur.” I wonder if the reporter has taken a look at just how partisan some of our country’s media behemoths actually are. Here is a summary of the ownership, lobbying, and political contributions of several of America’s largest media companies.

By P.J. Gladnick | March 22, 2017 | 1:16 PM EDT

Gosh, Senator Cleaver, your questions are so insightful and interesting that I wish this confirmation hearing could go on forever! Unless a nominee is a complete idiot, he (or she) will be incredibly polite during his confirmation hearings in the U.S. Senate. It is hardly the place to display a Fonzi ("Happy Days") attitude. However, Dana Milbank in the March 21 Washington Post suggests that the politeness demonstrated by Neil Gorsuch during his confirmation hearing for Supreme Court justice could be insincere thus making him a judicial version of Eddie Haskell from "Leave It to Beaver." If you are one of the small handful of people still unaware of Eddie Haskell, he was the young character who displayed insincere polite flattery towards adults to cover up  his true smart aleck attitude. 

By Tom Blumer | March 22, 2017 | 1:00 AM EDT

Early Tuesday evening, Curtis Houck at NewsBusters noted that the rape of a 14 year-old girl at a Maryland high school by two older teens (17 and 18) who recently arrived the U.S. was the subject of a question at Trump Press Secretary Sean Spicer's press conference earlier that day. The Washington Post's first story on the rape Friday illustrates Houck's observation that the crime is "an inconvenient story for their liberal narrative" that one must downplay or simply not report negative news about the actions of illegal immigrants.

By Nicholas Fondacaro | March 21, 2017 | 12:44 AM EDT

Following the release of President Donald Trump’s new federal budget last week, the liberal media was up in arms that Trump would dare to defund the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. On Sunday, a CNN anchor asked the MRC’s Dan Gainor if it was “conservative revenge.” But The Washington Post on Monday had an even more ridiculous explanation. “Trump wants to defund PBS. ‘Sesame Street’ brutally parodied him for decades,” read the headline to an arts and entertainment article by Avi Selk. 

By Brad Wilmouth | March 19, 2017 | 10:44 PM EDT

On Saturday's AM Joy on MSNBC, during a discussion of the defeat of right-wing politician Geert Wilders's political party in the Netherlands, MSNBC analyst Christopher Dickey derided Donald Trump as a "right-wing extremist" and "lunatic" who is "nuts" as he theorized that Europeans are rejecting such politicians because of the U.S. President. And recurring MSNBC guest and Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin declared that GOP ideology under Trump is "abhorrent" as she declared that "I don't consider myself a Republican any longer."

By Tim Graham | March 19, 2017 | 8:55 AM EDT

To underline how The Washington Post is a Democratic Party newspaper, the Sunday edition has a front-page puff piece on Sen. Al Franken. “Franken takes a judicious approach,” reads the newspaper headline. Online, the love is more palpable: “Al Franken may be the perfect senator for the Trump era — a deadly serious funnyman.”

By Tom Blumer | March 17, 2017 | 11:31 AM EDT

A Wonkblog item at the Washington Post about immigrants who have been receiving food stamps allegedly deciding to cancel their enrollment has been sharply criticized for a headline change which occurred a short time after the entry went up. It was: "Immigrants are now canceling their food stamps for fear that Trump will deport them"; now it's "Immigrants are going hungry so Trump won't deport them." Despite the headline revision's alarmism, that's nowhere near the most serious problem with Caitlin Dewey's post.

By Tom Blumer | March 16, 2017 | 8:15 PM EDT

On Tuesday, Tucker Carlson opened his Fox News show by reviewing the "evidence," after months of allegations and bitter left-leaning cable news hysteria, that Russia conspired, perhaps with now-President Donald Trump's help, to engineer the Republican's November presidential win — by, in short, asserting that "there's no reason to believe that Russia changed the course of American political history." Then, after savagely indicting NBC News for its obvious attempt to tip the scales in Hillary Clinton's favor by releasing the Access Hollywood Trump tape to the Washington Post two days before the second presidential debate, Carlson asked a far more important question: "What do you think played a bigger role in the 2016 race: The Access Hollywood tape or the Russian government." Answer: "That's an obvious one."