On Friday’s Good Morning America, ABC correspondent Cecilia Vega claimed that President Trump was violating the spirit of political unity following Wednesday’s shooting of Congressman Steve Scalise by taking to Twitter to criticize the ongoing Russia investigation. Of course there was no criticism of The Washington Post putting out a report on the day of the shooting based on anonymous illegal leaks claiming the President was a target of the investigation.


There are people who appear to live in hermetically sealed bubbles, and then there's Chris Cillizza, formerly of the Washington Post but now at CNN. On the apparently safe assumption that he really thought President Donald Trump and the public would have a hard time coming up with answers, Cillizza challenged the Commander in Chief and, and in effect the Twitterverse, to "name a (news) story that is 'fake' or 'incorrect.'" A tidal wave of specific responses arrived in short order.


On the Monday edition of the Fox Business Network’s Risk and Reward, the Media Research Center’s Tim Graham annihilated CNN’s lukewarm response to Believe host Reza Aslan’s vulgar tweet attacking President Donald Trump following Saturday night’s London terror attacks. 
 


Appearing on Monday’s NBC Today, White House adviser Kellyanne Conway ripped into the network for its “one-sided” hyperbolic coverage of President Trump’s Twitter reaction to Saturday’s London terror attack, calling out the liberal media “obsession” with his tweets.


Apparently Reza Aslan, the star and executive producer of CNN's Believer documentary series is among those who haven't figured out that whatever you put out there on the Internet stays out there on the Internet. In "apologizing" for his profane, since-deleted tweet directed at President Donald Trump Saturday evening after the London terrorist attacks, Aslan claimed that "it's not like me" to respond as he did in a "derogatory fashion." Your Twitter history says otherwise, pal.


Reza Aslan, the human brain eating CNN host of Believer expressed not the slightest hint of sympathy for the victims of the June 3 terror attacks in London on Twitter. Instead he was solely animated by intense hatred of President Donald Trump to the extent that he cursed him out as you can see in the following tweet:


Late Saturday night, London fell victim to yet another terrorist attack using a motor vehicle to mow down pedestrians.  As details were first coming out, Drudge Report put out a tweet which read: “Fear of new terror attack after van ‘mows down 20 people’ on London Bride…” Soon after, President Trump retweeted the message. The retweeting didn’t sit well with NBC Nightly News, who noted on their own account that “Pres. Trump has used Twitter to share news report on London incident. We aren’t relaying president’s retweet, as the info in unconfirmed.”


Behold another sign of the apocalypse, if you’re into preparing for that sort of thing. According to the news site Axios (with help from SocialFlow), the Twitter mentions for President Trump’s infamous new typo “covfefe” were over 50 times larger on Wednesday than those involving far-left comedienne Kathy Griffin after her disturbing photo with a fake severed Trump head.

 


The media is obsessed with Trump’s tweets, even moreso this week after a simple typo Trump made in the middle of the night, and was deleted shortly afterwards, sent reporters into a tailspin of faux confusion and concern. CNN New Day hosts Chris Cuomo and Alisyn Camerota, along with analysts John Avlon and April Ryan, spent several minutes Thursday morning wondering what the obvious typo meant, and harping on the misspelling as some sort of sign that the White House was out of control.


The controversy over Kathy Griffin holding up a bloodied severed head of Donald Trump — an action which has led to her removal from CNN's New Year's Eve programming — reportedly spilled into the President's family when TMZ reported that the Trumps' 11-year son "Barron was in front of the TV watching a show when the news came on and he saw the bloody, beheaded image." TMZ says: "We're told he panicked and screamed, 'Mommy, Mommy!'"


On Wednesday afternoon, MSNBC anchor Katy Tur was freaking out over President Trump’s overnight Twitter typo, even to the point of absurdly warning that the commander-in-chief’s use of social media could lead to a nuclear war.


For much of Tuesday, the country joined in rare collective outrage at the viral image of comedian Kathy Griffin holding aloft a mock bloody severed head of President Trump. Politicos from the left and right side of the spectrum shared a sense of disgust over the image that some equated to promoting violence, while one writer for The Atlantic didn’t have a problem with it. But at roughly eight o’clock PM Eastern time, Griffin finally spoke out about the images and issued an apology.