By Tom Johnson | May 26, 2016 | 6:05 PM EDT

Conservatives who accuse media outlets of liberal bias are a lot like shakedown artists, suggested Salon’s Marcotte in a Tuesday piece. In this context, the targets of the allegations don’t pay protection money; instead, they “bend…over backwards to placate” right-wingers, thereby “injecting conservative bias into the process as journalists, afraid of seeming too ‘liberal,’ hold conservative accusations and claims to a lower standard of scrutiny.”

Marcotte wrote that there’s “no real merit” to claims that Facebook gave short shrift to conservative-friendly news items. Nonetheless, she added, Facebook is seeking to “appease the bad faith ‘concerns’ of conservatives…which was probably the point…of generating this non-scandal in the first place: To pressure Facebook to remove safeguards, so that conservative lies and conspiracy theories can spread widely and quickly.”

By Tom Johnson | May 21, 2016 | 12:41 PM EDT

Since the concept of political correctness became well-known in the late 1980s, it’s typically been thought of as a left-wing phenomenon, but some liberals claim that conservatives have their own version of it. In a Thursday article, Steve Almond alleged that right-wing PC is “a relentless blaring Persecution Complex” which manifests as “a mindset that reframes its paranoid aggressions as legitimate and necessary forms of self-defense.”

“The conservative PC movement is what allows gun-toting madmen to see themselves as religious martyrs when they gun down human beings whose ‘crime’ is that they provide reproductive health services to poor women,” declared Almond. “At its extreme, it’s what prompts men like Timothy McVeigh to perpetrate acts of mass murder in response to the ‘tyranny’ of the U.S. Government.”

By Tom Blumer | May 20, 2016 | 9:16 AM EDT

In a Thursday morning column at Salon.com, leftist and longtime social critic Camille Paglia found it amusing that the New York Times thought that its supposedly major exposé about "a boastful, millionaire New Yorker (who) liked the company of beautiful women" was going to be considered big, game-changing news. In Paglia's view, the fact that the people at the Times believed they had something newsworthy in light of, in her words, the "long record of crude groping and grosser assaults" committed by Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton's husband Bill, demonstrates "why NYT can't lay a glove on Trump."

By Kristine Marsh | May 16, 2016 | 11:58 AM EDT

Musician Daryl Hall, of Hall & Oates fame, was interviewed by the left-wing rag Salon a few days ago about his career and the music industry. Towards the end of the interview, things appeared to become less friendly when the Salon reporter asked Hall a series of liberal talking point questions which he clearly didn’t appreciate, judging by his reaction. Hall pushed back against the questions, incredulously asking where those liberal talking points came from.

By Tom Johnson | May 6, 2016 | 9:52 PM EDT

Some on the left claim that Donald Trump is an ideological descendant of Ronald Reagan, never mind that Reagan was Mr. Conservative and Trump is Mr. Opportunist. Paul Campos, from the University of Colorado, makes a different Trump-as-heir-to-Reagan argument. In a Thursday Salon article, Campos opined that the Reagan revolution was less about right-wing views than “stupidity, celebrity, and plutocracy,” and that Trump is its “natural culmination.”

Campos sniped that “being famous for being famous is a sufficient basis for winning [the] presidential nomination [of] the party of Reagan, the know-nothing B-movie star” and stated that Trump’s electoral success “marks the triumph of plutocracy in its purest form. Ronald Reagan hated government, and loved business, to the point where he helped create our national infatuation with the idea of the heroic businessman…In a culture that worships both stupidity and celebrity, the self-serving lies of famous plutocrats are often swallowed whole.”

By Curtis Houck | May 6, 2016 | 7:01 PM EDT

Writing one of the more bizarre movie reviews one will read for Marvel’s Captain America: Civil War, Salon’s Amanda Marcotte whined in a Friday afternoon post that the latest Marvel film morphed the “New Deal Democrat” Captain America into “a douchey libertarian” “who believe[s] it’s cool to belong to a secretive paramilitary that rejects oversight and accountability to the public.”

By Tom Johnson | May 4, 2016 | 8:37 PM EDT

Not long before Ted Cruz left the presidential race, he inadvertently performed what Salon’s Marcotte suggests was a public service by clarifying that right-wingers are entitled authoritarians who readily inflict pain on kids.

Last weekend at an Indiana campaign rally, a boy in the audience yelled “You suck!” at Cruz, to which Cruz replied, “In my household, when a child behaves that way they get a spanking.” Marcotte asserted in a Tuesday piece that the incident “was one of those moments when the cowardice of the conservative movement was laid bare,” and that “enthusiasm for beating children” may be the best indication of “the toxicity of conservative ideology.”

By Tom Johnson | May 1, 2016 | 8:57 PM EDT

Several decades ago, there were plenty of right-of-center Democrats and left-of-center Republicans. These days, however, almost everyone agrees that the Democrats have become a distinctly liberal party and the GOP a distinctly conservative party. One who disagrees in part is writer Conor Lynch, who in a Saturday article claimed that Republicans have transitioned out of true conservatism and now are “extreme nihilists” who have “embraced Bolshevism of the right.”

Lynch noted that pundits such as George Will and David Brooks “have widely condemned Donald Trump as a fake conservative, and they’re not wrong. Trump is clearly not conservative—but neither is the Republican Party...[which] has become an increasingly friendly place for…the kind of characters who used to make up the John Birch Society…For the sake of John Boehner’s mental well being, he is lucky he got out when he did.”

By Melissa Mullins | April 19, 2016 | 1:03 PM EDT

So much for the buzz!  After missing its 2015 goal by more than $80 million, it was reported last week that Buzzfeed has cut its 2016 financial forecast in half – and other top left-wing websites like Gawker, Salon and the Huffington Post seem to be in just as much trouble.

By Tom Johnson | April 13, 2016 | 9:58 PM EDT

Author and former Fox News Watch panelist Gabler may or may not have a position on “Which came first, the chicken or the egg?” but he does believe that when it comes to Hillary (and Bill) Clinton, “the scandals didn’t create the meme of untrustworthiness about them. The meme of untrustworthiness created the scandals.”

In a piece that ran Tuesday on Salon and was originally published at BillMoyers.com, Gabler contended that the MSM “should have been a firewall against…allegations” such as the Whitewater “non-scandal,” but “instead…were an accelerant." On more recent matters, Gabler wrote that Hillary has been “exculpated” regarding Benghazi and commented, apropos of the e-mail uproar, that “the media don’t want to kill the story any more than the Republicans do. It’s just too delicious.”

By Tom Blumer | March 22, 2016 | 1:00 PM EDT

At Salon.com at 10:28 a.m., Amanda Marcotte wrote that "It will likely be days, perhaps weeks, before we know much about the horrific terrorist attacks on an airport and subway in Brussels on Tuesday morning that killed dozens of people."

Actually, dear, as of when I began this post about 90 minutes later, we alreadly know plenty. Most crucially, the Associated Press reported that the Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attacks roughly an hour after Marcotte's post. Once that's verified, and it almost certainly will be in short order, what else beyond the names of the de facto soldiers of the Islamic State will remain of the "much" that we don't know? But the most important thing to Marcotte, who is clearly blind in one eye and can't see out of the other, is that the United States has "a grown-up in charge" (links are in original; bolds are mine throughout this post):

By Bryan Ballas | March 16, 2016 | 5:20 PM EDT

The pro-abortion crowd always been extreme. They have to be extreme to hold the position that taking innocent life is legitimate. However, Bob Cesca of Salon.com has critiqued Indiana’s new pro-life legislation using language that is arguably out of place even at a NARAL board meeting.

According to Cesca, HB 1337, a pro-life bill recently passed by the Indiana legislature: