In remarks so bizarre and out of touch that satirists at outlets like The Onion would have rejected them if someone had suggested their inclusion in a made-up story, London's police chief has described the diversity of the city's London Bridge terror attack victims and witnesses interviewed as positive things. Gregory Katz at the Associated Press did his part to play along with the charade by failing to identify the lack of diversity among those who carried out the attack.


MSNBC's Richard Lui appears to be testing the limits of irresponsible media coverage of terrorist incidents. Up until now, the press has fretted in the aftermath of such attacks about possible retaliations or "backlash" against Muslims or others not involved in them, even though such misguided revenge-seeking has rarely occurred. Saturday evening, Lui worried about police "overreacting" shortly after terror attacks in London which, as of the time of this post, had taken the lives of seven innocents and injured 48 others, including 21 critically.


Longtime media bias observers know that if a Democrat wins a single special election race for national office during a Republican presidential administration, the press will say it's evidence that the nation's voters have changed their minds about which party should occupy the White House. If the Democrat loses ... well, in the pre-Internet era, the national press would pretend that the race never happened. These days, they instead have to come up with excuses, which are usually pathetic. The Associated Press engaged in such an exercise Friday morning after Republican Greg Gianforte defeated Democrat Rob Quist for Montana's single US House seat.


On Tuesday, Randy Hall at NewsBusters covered how "the Associated Press hired a 'freelancer' -- who turned out to be 'a hardcore left-wing activist' -- to attend a 'closed press' fund-raiser for the GOP in New Hampshire." In other words, the wire service sent Melanie Plenda to the event for the express purpose of crashing it, despite the NHGOP's clear instructions. It turns out that the Washington Post's Erik Wemple, in covering the fallout from Plenda's sneaky, sloppy work, is perfectly fine with that.


On May 12, California Governor Jerry Brown, during a visit to that state's Orange County, said, "The freeloaders — I’ve had enough of them." His statement came during what the Orange County Register called "an impassioned defense" of the state's recently passed "road-improvement plan. The "freeloaders" he targeted with his remark are the state's taxpayers, those who wish to recall a tax-supporting legislator, and Republicans involved in putting the tax on November ballot. The rest of California's press, as well as key national press outlets, have not taken note of Brown's remark.


Desperate to make a case that voter-ID laws kept "many" people who should be allowed to vote from casting ballots in Wisconsin in November, two reporters at the Associated Press claimed "it is not hard to find" examples of Badger State residents who were "turned away." Left unexplained is how reporters Christina A. Cassidy and Ivan Moreno apparently could only identify four people out of hundreds of thousands allegedly affected after six months of searching. Despite a headline claiming that those involved faced "insurmountable" barriers, each person cited could have successfully cast a ballot, but failed to do so because of inadequate follow-through.


Seattle Mayor Ed Murray announced on Tuesday that he will not run for reelection as the city's mayor because of mounting allegations that he sexually abused underage boys in the 1980s. Press coverage has either ignored Murray's Democratic Party affiliation or buried it in related stories' late paragraphs.

This outcome also exposes a double standard in the Evergreen State press, and should (but probably won't) lead management at these outlets, particularly at the Seattle Times, to question why they chose not to report multiple allegations against Murray which first surfaced almost a decade ago.


Let's imagine that an activist for a conservative cause supported committing physical violence up to and including murder against people doing things he or she sees as "immoral" in a letter to the editor at a local newspaper, and that this same person was behind a state ballot initiative designed to limit the activities of those "immoral" people. No one would reasonably expect that the leading newspaper in the state involved would for all practical purposes ignore this person's activities. But from all appearances, the Denver Post has virtually ignored the violence-advocating Andrew O'Connor, as well as his co-sponsorship of a Colorado ballot initiative to double the severance tax on the "immoral" oil and gas industry, since April 19.


A development has occurred which should erase any doubt that basic freedoms are in serious jeopardy in much of blue-state America. It is at least as disturbing as the failure of the University of California at Berkeley and the Berkeley Police Department to provide for the safety of conservative Ann Coulter, leading to the cancellation of her planned appearance there.


The combination of losing the House, and then the Senate, and then the presidency (to Donald Trump, of all people), while losing over 900 other legislative and executive branch seats in states throughout the land, has apparently led Tom Perez, the Democratic Party's new chairman, to believe that the party must curse its way back into power to properly motivate the faithful. Knowing that such a strategy would be poison if widely known, the establishment press failed to report audible and visible evidence of this strategy for over two weeks.


On the day after Earth Day's "March for Science," it seems appropriate to point to a column by University of Michigan History Professor Juan Cole in The Nation, a far-far-left publication considered a credible and authoritative go-to-source by the liberal intelligentsia. On April 18, Cole, echoing statements made during their final years in power by Barack Obama and his administration's officials with establishment press acquiescence, nonsensically claimed that Syria's biggest problem during the past decade has been ... carbon dioxide. Hardly.


The Associated Press and the New York Times were in London early this week for the funeral and memorial ceremonies for Keith Palmer, the police officer killed by Khalid Masood on March 22 as the radical Islamist attempted to make his way towards Westminster Palace after running down and killing four pedestrians and wounding dozens of others in a rented SUV. Strangely (no, not really), they've ignored several UK press reports showing that Masood, contrary to what was reported in the days immediately following the terror attack, was listed as the contact person at a radical Islamist website, had ties to a mosque that "that urges Muslims to take up arms," and virtually sequestered himself from the outside world — except the internet — for three months before carrying out his attack.