By Tom Blumer | March 16, 2017 | 12:03 PM EDT

For all of its shortcomings and limitations, one very useful benefit of Twitter is that it has exposed the breathtaking ignorance of so many supposedly well-educated journalists. A recent stunning example involves April Ryan, who, after the first two pages of Donald Trump's 2005 federal tax return were illegally revealed Tuesday on MSNBC, tweeted: "So in 2005 @POTUS was not a Billionaire," because "He made in 2005 over 100 million dollars."

By Kristine Marsh | March 9, 2017 | 12:02 PM EST

For someone who's supposedly anti-bullying, Dan Savage sure likes to bully conservatives and Christians a lot. In his latest “Savage Love” podcast, the liberal gay activist went on a tirade against First Lady Melania Trump, calling her “ugly on the inside,” and a host of other names, according to TheWrap.

 
By Kristine Marsh | March 7, 2017 | 10:48 AM EST

Monday evening conservative radio host Mark Levin shot back at the media, after several networks and pundits mocked him as a “conspiracy theorist” who propagated stories from anonymous sources. This came after Levin talked about reports that the Obama Administration had eavesdropped on Trump's associates before the election, reports Levin asserted, he got from the mainstream media itself. “Apparently now I have forced the media to do its job!” Levin snarked before accusing the media of being “schizophrenic” for forgetting their own reporting.

 
By Curtis Houck | March 6, 2017 | 3:31 PM EST

Hours after CNN’s Reliable Sources host Brian Stelter published a Monday morning piece blasting conservative talk radio host Mark Levin for offering “an incendiary idea” that the Obama administration was surveilling then-candidate Donald Trump, Levin fired back with an open letter addressing Stelter’s “incredible” smear.

 

By Tom Johnson | February 23, 2017 | 4:29 PM EST

CPAC, currently going on just outside the Beltway in National Harbor, Maryland, has changed along with the conservative movement, believes Matthew Yglesias. Old-school CPAC, Yglesias contended in a Wednesday piece, was philosophically driven, populated by the sort of activists who “helped [Ronald] Reagan mount a primary challenge to incumbent President Gerald Ford.” In the past fifteen-plus years, however, it has become “to a substantial extent a live version of the conservative entertainment experience that one could also get on cable or on the radio.” In other words, it's now Donald Trump's CPAC, which “reflect[s] the reality” that conservatives are “older, whiter, and less educated than the population at large and [are] filled with a keen sense of nostalgia for the good old days.”

By Kristine Marsh | February 22, 2017 | 12:39 PM EST

During Tuesday’s press conference, American Urban Radio Networks reporter April Ryan asked Spicer a series of hostile questions about President Trump’s attitudes towards blacks. Most dubiously, Ryan claimed Trump once said “white America built this country,” a statement she could not back up after Spicer questioned the legitimacy of this “quote” from the president.

By Curtis Houck | and By Scott Whitlock | February 16, 2017 | 6:23 PM EST

On Thursday, President Donald Trump held a marathon press conference, covering a whole host of topics. Both during and afterward, the media meltdowns were palpable. On both social media and television, they lamented the President’s repeated attacks on their negative coverage of his administration and what he deemed to be fake news as a result of their “level of dishonesty” that’s “out of control.”

By Curtis Houck | February 9, 2017 | 5:06 PM EST

Thursday’s White House press briefing was a tense affair as fireworks sparked between press secretary Sean Spicer and SiriusXM’s Jared Rizzi, who complained about the topics covered in Trump’s tweets and inadvertently (or not) gave credence to the idea of not having press secretary speak on the President’s behalf.  At one point, Spicer lashed out at Rizzi for essentially arguing that Spicer’s words should be discounted compared to a presidential tweet, arguing it’s “the silliest thing I’ve ever heard.” 

By Matthew Balan | January 12, 2017 | 11:07 AM EST

Tuesday's All Things Considered on NPR played up the long-term effect of the anti-ObamaCare "death panel" talking point and labeled this phrase "fake news." Don Gonyea let President Obama; Anita Dunn, his former communications director; and a talking head from the left-wing Center for American Progress decry the "dishonest" message from ObamaCare opponents and lament the "lasting negative effect" of the "early disinformation campaign" against the law. He touted that "the false claims of death panels would be named the lie of the year by the fact-checking organization PolitiFact."

By Kristine Marsh | January 3, 2017 | 4:25 PM EST

Monday, musician Bruce Springsteen expressed his paranoia over the future of an America under Donald Trump on liberal comedian Marc Maron’s podcast. The longtime liberal told Maron that he feared America would become “unrecognizable” because of a rise in hate crimes and other “un-American” activities.

By Tom Johnson | January 1, 2017 | 6:59 PM EST

In the mid-1990s, when the great Norm Macdonald was kicking off his “Weekend Update” segments of Saturday Night Live with, “And now, the fake news,” pretty much everyone knew what he meant. These days, however, disputes over definitions of “fake news” seem as common as fake news itself. It may be that the lefty writer angriest about fake news is media critic and political blogger Allison Hantschel, who in a Tuesday post at First Draft blamed the problem on both conservative media (for undermining the mainstream media) and the MSM (for not vigorously defending itself until it was too late).

By Tom Blumer | December 23, 2016 | 2:18 PM EST

Fear not for the future of investigative journalism. Rest assured that the folks at the Politico have poured significant journalistic resources into such efforts, delving into many all-important matters relating to Donald Trump and his new administration. Why, on Friday, its Darren Samuelsohn reported that Donald Trump's 2012 driver's license says he's 6'2" inches tall, while The Donald and one of his doctors say that he's 6'3".