By Matthew Balan | December 6, 2016 | 5:15 PM EST

NPR's Morning Edition on Tuesday touted how many "anti-poverty advocates across the political spectrum" are now "worried" after President-Elect Donald Trump picked Dr. Ben Carson to be secretary of housing and urban development. Correspondent Pam Fessler spotlighted how "advocates fear the worst — that it will lead to deep cuts in programs to reduce homelessness, and to subsidize affordable housing." However, Fessler didn't mention that her first "advocate" worked in the Obama administration, and the second donated to his presidential campaign.

By Curtis Houck | November 16, 2016 | 8:18 PM EST

At the top of his eponymous syndicated talk radio program on Wednesday, conservative icon Rush Limbaugh was at his best in demolishing the media’s insistence that President-elect Doanld Trump’s transition team is collapsing when it’s really “the media” (including “little Brian Stelter”), ObamaCare, and the Clinton empire that are all “imploding.” 

By Jeffrey Lord | November 6, 2016 | 3:37 PM EST

Here we go again. Over at Business Insider, one-time Glenn Beck guy Oliver Darcy (he formerly of Beck’s The Blaze) and BI’s Pamela Engel have headlined "[t]he GOP must do something about the conservative media industrial complex if it wants to survive" in which they write that (brace yourselves) President Obama has correctly diagnosed the problem with the GOP. 

By Tom Blumer | November 4, 2016 | 10:00 PM EDT

A Wednesday column at Vanity Fair by former National Public Radio CEO Ken Stern started on a promising track, but ended up in the same place as the rest of the establishment press: Donald Trump must lose, even if the press has to abandon all semblance of fairness and objectivity to accomplish that task. Stern observed the obviously unbalanced presidential race coverage at the Washington Post with its "incredible array of (Donald) Trump-phobia" and "virtually no mention of Clinton or any other candidate." But then, as will be seen after the jump, he basically justified it all.

By Tom Blumer | October 19, 2016 | 3:20 PM EDT

Today's installment of Stupid Fact Checks again goes after Politifact, this time on two items in one "fact check." First, the web site's Louis Jacobson claims that Michelle Obama couldn't possibly have been talking about the Clintons on August 12, 2007 when she told an audience about the importance of a First Family serving as a "role model" in the White House. It's obvious to any human without blinders that she was. Second, Jacobson claims that he doesn't remember "'vicious' attack ads from Obama during the 2008 campaign." That's because he didn't look very hard, if at all.

By Tom Blumer | October 14, 2016 | 8:31 AM EDT

On Bill Press's radio and Free Speech TV show, D.C. nonvoting congressional representative Eleanor Holmes Norton proved that Michelle Obama's recent admonition that "when they go low we stay high" is something the left pretends to advocate in theory but almost never follows in practice. Moments after quoting Ms. Obama, Ms. Norton, who no one will mistake for a supermodel, began making insulting, derogatory comments about the appearance of women present at the second presidential debate who are hostile to the Clintons.

By Matthew Balan | October 13, 2016 | 4:46 PM EDT

On WMAL's Mornings on the Mall on Thursday, CNN's Jake Tapper revealed his "understanding" about what happened surrounding the leaked town hall question to the Hillary Clinton campaign: "This was a Roland Martin follow-up. So, my understanding is that he, or...somebody on his team got that question to Donna Brazile." Brazile apparently then sent question to Hillary Clinton's campaign, as revealed by Wikileaks' release of John Podesta's e-mails on Tuesday.

By Jack Coleman | October 11, 2016 | 8:06 PM EDT

Nearly all the attention toward WikiLeaks' release of hacked emails from the Democratic National Committee and Clinton campaign has focused on what's contained in the correspondence. It's what is conspicuously absent from them that is also worthy of scrutiny.

On his radio show today, Rush Limbaugh demonstrated one of the reasons he continues to draw the biggest audience in the industry -- by pointing out something no one else apparently noticed that, in hindsight, appears obvious.

By Matthew Balan | October 6, 2016 | 9:19 PM EDT

NPR's Morning Edition on Thursday donated four minutes of air time to pro-abortion group EMILY's List, and helped it promote its ad blitz to elect Hillary Clinton and other left-wing Democrats. Renee Montagne played a clip from one of the organization's ads, and gave its president, Stephanie Schriock, a platform to hype Mrs. Clinton as a "a champion for women and families."

By Jack Coleman | October 6, 2016 | 7:56 PM EDT

Before there was Anti-Trump Psychosis, before there was Bush Derangement Syndrome, it was Ronald Wilson Reagan who could be counted on to derail liberals from the semblance of reality they occasionally cling to.

The years since Reagan left the White House, and the country in far better shape than when he took office, have lessened the left's visceral loathing for a statesman who ended the Cold War without reeling off a shot, after American liberals for decades repeatedly apologized for the Evil Empire instead of seeing it for the mass-murdering monstrosity that it was.

By Matthew Balan | October 3, 2016 | 3:58 PM EDT

On NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday, John Burnett hyped the objections of a few residents of Gonzales, Texas to gun rights backers' use of the town's slogan from the Texas Revolution. Burnett played up how "some Gonzalians are taken aback to see that Second Amendment activists have appropriated 'Come and Take It,' and substituted an assault rifle for their hallowed cannon." However, he failed to explain that the slogan has its roots in the reply of a king from ancient Greece, who rebuked an enemy's demand to disarm.

By NB Staff | August 30, 2016 | 10:40 PM EDT

On Tuesday night, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell joined FNC’s The Kelly File and spoke with host Megyn Kelly to urge caution on the part of conservatives and Republicans in blaming conservative media figures like Rush Limbaugh for Donald Trump’s candidacy by pointing out that, no matter what individuals him say, they face scrutiny from the liberal media or anyone who didn’t back the eventual nominee.