By Matthew Balan | January 12, 2017 | 11:07 AM EST

Tuesday's All Things Considered on NPR played up the long-term effect of the anti-ObamaCare "death panel" talking point and labeled this phrase "fake news." Don Gonyea let President Obama; Anita Dunn, his former communications director; and a talking head from the left-wing Center for American Progress decry the "dishonest" message from ObamaCare opponents and lament the "lasting negative effect" of the "early disinformation campaign" against the law. He touted that "the false claims of death panels would be named the lie of the year by the fact-checking organization PolitiFact."

By Kristine Marsh | January 3, 2017 | 4:25 PM EST

Monday, musician Bruce Springsteen expressed his paranoia over the future of an America under Donald Trump on liberal comedian Marc Maron’s podcast. The longtime liberal told Maron that he feared America would become “unrecognizable” because of a rise in hate crimes and other “un-American” activities.

By Tom Johnson | January 1, 2017 | 6:59 PM EST

In the mid-1990s, when the great Norm Macdonald was kicking off his “Weekend Update” segments of Saturday Night Live with, “And now, the fake news,” pretty much everyone knew what he meant. These days, however, disputes over definitions of “fake news” seem as common as fake news itself. It may be that the lefty writer angriest about fake news is media critic and political blogger Allison Hantschel, who in a Tuesday post at First Draft blamed the problem on both conservative media (for undermining the mainstream media) and the MSM (for not vigorously defending itself until it was too late).

By Tom Blumer | December 23, 2016 | 2:18 PM EST

Fear not for the future of investigative journalism. Rest assured that the folks at the Politico have poured significant journalistic resources into such efforts, delving into many all-important matters relating to Donald Trump and his new administration. Why, on Friday, its Darren Samuelsohn reported that Donald Trump's 2012 driver's license says he's 6'2" inches tall, while The Donald and one of his doctors say that he's 6'3". 

By Tim Graham | December 11, 2016 | 9:14 AM EST

National Public Radio likes to think it's about civility (not rudeness) and real news (not fake news). But when it comes to Donald Trump, on Friday night NPR became the promoter of a rude and disparaging joke on All Things Considered. Washington Post columnist and NPR contributor E. J. Dionne passed along a joke from unfunny leftist Andy Borowitz in The New Yorker: that Trump's picks were so contrary to the government's mission that next he would name Mexican drug kingpin "El Chapo" to run the DEA.

By Matthew Balan | December 6, 2016 | 5:15 PM EST

NPR's Morning Edition on Tuesday touted how many "anti-poverty advocates across the political spectrum" are now "worried" after President-Elect Donald Trump picked Dr. Ben Carson to be secretary of Housing and Urban Development. Correspondent Pam Fessler spotlighted how "advocates fear the worst — that it will lead to deep cuts in programs to reduce homelessness, and to subsidize affordable housing." However, Fessler didn't mention that her first "advocate" worked in the Obama administration, and the second donated to his presidential campaign.

By Curtis Houck | November 16, 2016 | 8:18 PM EST

At the top of his eponymous syndicated talk radio program on Wednesday, conservative icon Rush Limbaugh was at his best in demolishing the media’s insistence that President-elect Doanld Trump’s transition team is collapsing when it’s really “the media” (including “little Brian Stelter”), ObamaCare, and the Clinton empire that are all “imploding.” 

By Jeffrey Lord | November 6, 2016 | 3:37 PM EST

Here we go again. Over at Business Insider, one-time Glenn Beck guy Oliver Darcy (he formerly of Beck’s The Blaze) and BI’s Pamela Engel have headlined "[t]he GOP must do something about the conservative media industrial complex if it wants to survive" in which they write that (brace yourselves) President Obama has correctly diagnosed the problem with the GOP. 

By Tom Blumer | November 4, 2016 | 10:00 PM EDT

A Wednesday column at Vanity Fair by former National Public Radio CEO Ken Stern started on a promising track, but ended up in the same place as the rest of the establishment press: Donald Trump must lose, even if the press has to abandon all semblance of fairness and objectivity to accomplish that task. Stern observed the obviously unbalanced presidential race coverage at the Washington Post with its "incredible array of (Donald) Trump-phobia" and "virtually no mention of Clinton or any other candidate." But then, as will be seen after the jump, he basically justified it all.

By Tom Blumer | October 19, 2016 | 3:20 PM EDT

Today's installment of Stupid Fact Checks again goes after Politifact, this time on two items in one "fact check." First, the web site's Louis Jacobson claims that Michelle Obama couldn't possibly have been talking about the Clintons on August 12, 2007 when she told an audience about the importance of a First Family serving as a "role model" in the White House. It's obvious to any human without blinders that she was. Second, Jacobson claims that he doesn't remember "'vicious' attack ads from Obama during the 2008 campaign." That's because he didn't look very hard, if at all.

By Tom Blumer | October 14, 2016 | 8:31 AM EDT

On Bill Press's radio and Free Speech TV show, D.C. nonvoting congressional representative Eleanor Holmes Norton proved that Michelle Obama's recent admonition that "when they go low we stay high" is something the left pretends to advocate in theory but almost never follows in practice. Moments after quoting Ms. Obama, Ms. Norton, who no one will mistake for a supermodel, began making insulting, derogatory comments about the appearance of women present at the second presidential debate who are hostile to the Clintons.

By Matthew Balan | October 13, 2016 | 4:46 PM EDT

On WMAL's Mornings on the Mall on Thursday, CNN's Jake Tapper revealed his "understanding" about what happened surrounding the leaked town hall question to the Hillary Clinton campaign: "This was a Roland Martin follow-up. So, my understanding is that he, or...somebody on his team got that question to Donna Brazile." Brazile apparently then sent question to Hillary Clinton's campaign, as revealed by Wikileaks' release of John Podesta's e-mails on Tuesday.