By Jorge Bonilla | March 27, 2017 | 4:01 PM EDT

Predictably, Univision has also now joined the liberal media parade in defense of taxpayer funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and National Public Radio (NPR), with a totally one-sided report that is short on facts, as well as laden with omissions and laughable fallacies.

By Julia A. Seymour | March 24, 2017 | 10:15 AM EDT

Liberals in the news media hate government funding cuts, especially cuts that threaten promoters of their agenda. Which is why they were so outraged about cuts to left-wing public broadcasting programs that some lied to viewers and readers about the consequences.

By Brad Wilmouth | March 24, 2017 | 7:16 AM EDT

On Thursday's Tavis Smiley show, PBS host Smiley made one of the most over the top analogies one will hear in the health care debate as he likened the repeal of ObamaCare to a "drive-by" shooting that would "kill" people who are "innocent bystanders" as he hosted liberal activist Sister Simone Campbell as his guest. Smiley wondered how Speaker Paul Ryan views people who might suffer if ObamaCare were repealed: "They may not be the targets, but there are often innocent victims who are -- the bystanders.They get hit in a drive-by. Somebody came through there to kill somebody -- and you weren't the target, but you got killed as an innocent bystander. Does he not -- so if he doesn't see them as the targets, does he see them as potentially innocent persons who are going to get killed in this drive-by?"

By Brad Wilmouth | March 22, 2017 | 6:30 PM EDT

On Tuesday's Tavis Smiley show on PBS, as New York magazine's Andrew Sullivan appeared as a guest to discuss current political events, host Smiley at one point fretted that -- because Republicans denied President Barack Obama the chance to appoint Judge Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court -- they were "trampling" on the Constitution, and oddly asked if they might ignore other parts of the Constitution like the abolition of slavery or the right for women to vote. Suggesting that Republicans violated the Constitution in blocking Judge Garland, Smiley whined: "It was, to be sure, a violation of democratic norms, but it was more than that. To me, it was a trampling on the Constitution by the Republican party who did not give Mr. Garland a hearing. ... He was obligated to put forth that nomination, and they were obligated to take it up, I believe, and vote up or down. So it wasn't just a violation or an abrogation of norms, it was a trampling on one of our most precious documents."

By Tim Graham | March 22, 2017 | 3:18 PM EDT

Open.President Trump's budget proposes defunding the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. If it passes Congress, it will take two years for funding to be discontinued, but the liberal public-media lobby is panicking.  These hyperbole artists insist "Our public media is for everyone." That's just a lie. Conservatives are not welcome in public media.

By Scott Whitlock | March 21, 2017 | 11:35 AM EDT

The fear tactics from partisan liberal journalists are at work to save funding for PBS. USA Today online on Tuesday trumpeted this deceptive headline: “Could Trump's 2018 budget kill Sesame Street's beloved Big Bird?” Well, no. Because Sesame Street no longer receives government funding and airs on HBO. The news outlet also outrageously connected the defunding move to bigotry. 

By Nicholas Fondacaro | March 21, 2017 | 12:44 AM EDT

Following the release of President Donald Trump’s new federal budget last week, the liberal media was up in arms that Trump would dare to defund the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. On Sunday, a CNN anchor asked the MRC’s Dan Gainor if it was “conservative revenge.” But The Washington Post on Monday had an even more ridiculous explanation. “Trump wants to defund PBS. ‘Sesame Street’ brutally parodied him for decades,” read the headline to an arts and entertainment article by Avi Selk. 

By Clay Waters | March 18, 2017 | 7:37 PM EDT

President Trump’s first proposed budget resulted in a patchwork of short, dire stories dominated two pages of the print edition Friday. The headlines provide the tone for the ideologically loaded stories: “Researchers Bristle at Extent of Cuts” at the National Institute of Health and Department of Energy. Meanwhile, the Department of Housing and Urban Development was “‘Hurt and Upset’ Over Potential Losses,” and “States Would Lose Help in Emergencies” because of cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency.” Let’s focus on perceived Trump attacks on two liberal playpens in particular: public broadcasting, and the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment of the Humanities.

By Brad Wilmouth | March 18, 2017 | 6:17 PM EDT

On Friday's PBS NewsHour, the show's regular "Shields and Brooks" segment unintentionally summed up the major problem conservatives have with the show -- that there is no actual conservative panel member giving a contrasting point of view against liberal columnist Mark Shields as he and New York Times columnist David Brooks often show little disagreement when discussing the week's political news. As the two men were both critical of Republicans over both ObamaCare repeal and the White House budget, not only did Shields at one point declare that "I can't argue with any point that David (Brooks) made," but a bit later, host Judy Woodruff observed that "both of you are saying the same thing." Shields then joked: "What? I hope not. I mean, there's no point in watching."

By Tim Graham | March 16, 2017 | 10:49 PM EDT

President Trump's first budget proposed to end funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, something we at the MRC have advocated throughout our history. It's not fair that conservative taxpayers should have to subsidize propaganda programs that insult their political philosophy and assault their favorite politicians.

By NB Staff | March 16, 2017 | 5:06 PM EDT

Late Thursday afternoon, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell released a statement praising President Donald Trump’s budget proposal, including the decision to defund the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB).

By Kyle Drennen | March 16, 2017 | 3:48 PM EDT

On Thursday’s NBC Today, co-host Matt Lauer introduced a report on the “major battle” brewing over President Trump’s budget proposal by proclaiming: “The blueprint just out this morning already facing some criticism. So what's in it and which popular programs could see their funding slashed?”