Thursday morning, Harvard Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy issued a report which confirmed what NewsBusters reported in April, namely that President Donald Trump "has received unsparing coverage for most weeks of his presidency, without a single major topic where Trump’s coverage, on balance, was more positive than negative, setting a new standard for unfavorable press coverage of a president." On Sunday, CNN's John Berman tried to cast Fox News as a conservatively biased outlier — as opposed to the relatively fair and balanced entity it has actually been during the Trump administration's early months — by selecting the results of one tiny element of the Shorenstein report and presenting it as if it was the study's comprehensive conclusion.


In the New York Times Sunday Review, chief Hillary Clinton campaign reporter Amy Chozick (who is writing a book on the campaign) tells tales from the makeup room at sexist, biased Fox News in “Hillary, Roger, and Me.” The story’s text box: “Ailes made female reporters look like models, and Clinton like a criminal.” Chozick’s distaste for conservative-leaning television was apparent. She implied that it was just a shame that “poetic justice” wasn’t served, and that Hillary Clinton didn’t bring down Trump and Ailes herself.


The White House Correspondents’ Dinner was supposedly a celebration of the first amendment, but Saturday’s dinner was a Donald Trump bashing fest with cries of his threat to journalism. But during Sunday’s MediaBuzz on Fox News, The Hill’s Joe Concha unloaded on his liberal colleagues for their overblown hysteria. “Here is what I will say to that. Press briefings with Sean Spicer have never been more democratic,” he declared. 


On Friday, Adam Housley at Fox News delivered bombshell news that a "very well-known, very high up, very senior (person) in the intelligence world" not in the FBI had engaged in "the unmasking of the names of American citizens" in the course of surveillance surfacing "members of the Trump administration" that had  nothing to do with Russia ... or foreign intelligence of any kind." On Sunday morning's Fox & Friends, Clayton Morris reported that the Big Three broadcast networks, CNN and MSNBC devoted had to that point devoted absolutely no coverage to what Housley reported, despite granting heavy play to a Thursday New York Times story which Housley's sources insist is wrong.


CNN's Brian Stelter angrily contends that the rape of a 14 year-old girl at Rockville High School in Montgomery County, Maryland on March 16 at the hands of two late-teen illegal immigrant freshman classmates should never have been a national story — and the fact that it is to an extent, despite obvious attempts to blackball it by the Big Three broadcast networks, is all Fox News's fault. The real question, which the public education establishment and their accomplices in the press don't want anyone to ask, is this: What has happened in the nation's schools during the past 35 years as a result of the Supreme Court's 1982 Plyler vs. Doe decision, which opened the floodgates allowing children in this country illegally unlimited access to U.S. public education?


During the Wednesday morning edition of the America's Newsroom program on the Fox News Channel, co-anchor Bill Hemmer discussed the release of part of Donald Trump's 2005 income tax return with Howard Kurtz, who called the incident “a big-time blunder” by Rachel Maddow, who devoted her entire eponymous MSNBC program on Tuesday night to the two pages of information provided by liberal reporter and author David Cay Johnston.


In what could only be described as one of the most cringe-worthy and disrespectful interview to date, Fox News Channel host Martha MacCallum took on a petulant filmmaker in Jason Pollock and his “documentary” on the murder of Michael Brown during Monday night’s First 100 Days.


The outcome of the Michael Brown saga in Ferguson, Missouri, which began in August 2014, reached a climax in November 2014 when a grand jury did not indict police officer Darren Wilson, and ended with a whimper in March 2015 when the Justice Department saw no basis for bringing civil rights charges, infuriated the left. So it seemed inevitable that a conspiracy theory would emerge attempting to rehabilitate Brown's reputation while planting doubt about the circumstances leading to his death — and one just has.


The media were at DEFCON three Thursday following a lengthy and heated press conference with President Donald Trump where he went toe-to-toe with the biased press. Trump’s tongue lashing of the media had Fox News’ Shepard Smith frothing at the mouth with anger as he accused the President with a dubious smear during his show. “Your opposition was hacked and the Russians were responsible for it and your people were on the phone with Russia the same day it was happening and we're fools asking the questions,” he shouted with claims no report had ever made. 


Appearing on Sunday’s edition of Fox News’s MediaBuzz, The Hill’s Joe Concha ripped into CNN’s Jim Acosta as “entitled” and “obnoxious” when he tussled on Wednesday with President-elect Trump by “grandstanding” and yelling over a dozen times at Trump.


When the outrageous remarks about women Donald Trump made in 2005 became known just before the second presidential debate, the press compiled exhaustive lists of Republicans far and wide who would no longer support the Republican presidential nominee.

Will the press compile similar lists of those who won't support Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in light of new developments during the past several days relating to her use of a private server and private email accounts for government business? Will they even ask anyone the question? It can now be reported that the won't-vote-for-Hillary list — and it certainly has more than one person, even if not yet admitted — has a member whose relationship with the Clintons goes back over two decades: Democrat pollster Doug Schoen.


The Media Research Center’s Rich Noyes appeared on Fox and Friends Sunday, where he called out the liberal media for journalists “willing to step forward and carry some of that water” for the Hillary Clinton campaign’s push back of FBI Director James Comey.  “Unless you think he's lying about the timeline he explained in his letter to congress, he was briefed about this and felt the need to proceed and he felt like he should inform the committees that he had talked to that he was updating the record,” Noyes explained.