By Matthew Balan | January 12, 2017 | 11:07 AM EST

Tuesday's All Things Considered on NPR played up the long-term effect of the anti-ObamaCare "death panel" talking point and labeled this phrase "fake news." Don Gonyea let President Obama; Anita Dunn, his former communications director; and a talking head from the left-wing Center for American Progress decry the "dishonest" message from ObamaCare opponents and lament the "lasting negative effect" of the "early disinformation campaign" against the law. He touted that "the false claims of death panels would be named the lie of the year by the fact-checking organization PolitiFact."

By Tim Graham | January 6, 2017 | 6:53 AM EST

NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik appeared on the NPR-produced midday show Here and Now on Wednesday to discuss Megyn Kelly’s move from Fox News to NBC. He twice praised her for “cannily” negotiating herself across the media spectrum -- strange new respect which might make a conservative think she’s headed straight to the left. Then came the jaw-dropper: He said she was "desperately hoping to get away from ideology" like....Diane Sawyer or Barbara Walters.

By Matthew Balan | January 4, 2017 | 3:40 PM EST

Danielle Kurtzleben played up in a Tuesday item for NPR's website that "just one of the 535 members of the new Congress" is nonreligious. Kurtzleben underlined that "the nation's top legislative body remains far more male and white than the rest of the U.S. population...but religion is one of the more invisible areas where legislators in Washington simply aren't representative of the people they represent." However, the correspondent later revealed that this members of this demographic hold some responsibility for this under-representation.

By Tim Graham | December 29, 2016 | 8:28 PM EST

Every nonprofit group is ending the year with a pitch for last-minute tax-exempt contributions, and that includes National Public Radio. NPR fans received an e-mail with the subject line "Bold, unbiased journalism." That's pretty funny coming from a network that puts a loving touch on Barack Obama in interviews and never secured an interview with Donald Trump.

Bob Dole in 1996 and Mitt Romney in 2012 also skipped an NPR interview.  So every GOP challenger in the last 20 years except George W. Bush skipped public radio. Doesn't that speak volumes?

By Tom Blumer | December 23, 2016 | 2:18 PM EST

Fear not for the future of investigative journalism. Rest assured that the folks at the Politico have poured significant journalistic resources into such efforts, delving into many all-important matters relating to Donald Trump and his new administration. Why, on Friday, its Darren Samuelsohn reported that Donald Trump's 2012 driver's license says he's 6'2" inches tall, while The Donald and one of his doctors say that he's 6'3". 

By Tim Graham | December 11, 2016 | 9:14 AM EST

National Public Radio likes to think it's about civility (not rudeness) and real news (not fake news). But when it comes to Donald Trump, on Friday night NPR became the promoter of a rude and disparaging joke on All Things Considered. Washington Post columnist and NPR contributor E. J. Dionne passed along a joke from unfunny leftist Andy Borowitz in The New Yorker: that Trump's picks were so contrary to the government's mission that next he would name Mexican drug kingpin "El Chapo" to run the DEA.

By Matthew Balan | December 6, 2016 | 5:15 PM EST

NPR's Morning Edition on Tuesday touted how many "anti-poverty advocates across the political spectrum" are now "worried" after President-Elect Donald Trump picked Dr. Ben Carson to be secretary of Housing and Urban Development. Correspondent Pam Fessler spotlighted how "advocates fear the worst — that it will lead to deep cuts in programs to reduce homelessness, and to subsidize affordable housing." However, Fessler didn't mention that her first "advocate" worked in the Obama administration, and the second donated to his presidential campaign.

By Tom Johnson | November 27, 2016 | 6:06 PM EST

In covering the recent presidential campaign, the mainstream media far too often made the perfect the enemy of the good, believes Leigh Gilmore -- “the good” in this case being synonymous with “Hillary Clinton.” Gilmore, a professor in the women's and gender studies department at Hillary’s undergraduate alma mater, Wellesley, claims that “the bias against Hillary Clinton was not simply a story the media reported -- it was the unexamined narrative the press repeated over and over...Why was the lie more persistent than the truth? Why was ‘Crooked Hillary’ a more compelling figure than ‘Fundamentally Honest Hillary’?”

By Tim Graham | November 26, 2016 | 8:07 PM EST

On their Friday Week in Politics segment on National Public Radio’s All Things Considered newscast, they discussed just how “ultraconservative” the early Trump cabinet picks are.  No one eight years ago discussed how “ultraliberal” Barack Obama’s administration would get.  But New York Times columnist David Brooks at least made this discussion of extremism amusing  by suggesting Trumpians were “headbanger Guns N' Roses conservatives.” This is amusing in part because GNR lead singer Axl Rose rants against Trump on Twitter.

By Jack Coleman | November 22, 2016 | 7:42 PM EST

Yet more evidence of a world turned upside down since Donald Trump won the presidency and charitable donations to the Clinton Foundation predictably plummeted -- National Public Radio is no longer a safe space for liberals to opine.

At least it wasn't early today for former congressman Barney Frank of Massachusetts, one of the main architects of the housing bubble that brought down the economy a decade ago and a man who has surprisingly managed to remain out of prison for his role in the debacle.

 

By Tom Blumer | November 4, 2016 | 10:00 PM EDT

A Wednesday column at Vanity Fair by former National Public Radio CEO Ken Stern started on a promising track, but ended up in the same place as the rest of the establishment press: Donald Trump must lose, even if the press has to abandon all semblance of fairness and objectivity to accomplish that task. Stern observed the obviously unbalanced presidential race coverage at the Washington Post with its "incredible array of (Donald) Trump-phobia" and "virtually no mention of Clinton or any other candidate." But then, as will be seen after the jump, he basically justified it all.

By Sarah Stites | November 1, 2016 | 11:35 AM EDT

On October 21, radio show This American Life featured a song imagining how President Obama feels about “flexing” “demagogue” Donald Trump.