NPR blatantly slanted a story against a Catholic bishop in Illinois who recently instructed his priests to deny the Eucharist, last rites, and funerals decree with quotes from four activists who dissent against the Catholic Church's teachings on sexuality. While the article included excerpts from the cleric's document, as well as from a statement from his diocese, they failed to interview anyone conservative or orthodox to provide more balance to the four dissenters.


Tuesday's All Things Considered on NPR touted how many Muslims in the United Kingdom are blaming British media outlets for the Monday incident where a Welsh man drove his van into a crowd outside a mosque in London. In their view, "the way the media covers Muslims has fueled hatred of their community," as host Kelly McEvers put it.


Here's why people hate the liberal tilt of public broadcasting. Both PBS and NPR buried the Scalise shooting in their "week in review" segments. When the PBS NewsHour arrived there, anchor Judy Woodruff couldn't even mention the shooter was a Bernie Sanders campaign volunteer, couldn't mention his favorite TV shows, and couldn't ponder if anyone on the Left could have provoked him with their outrageous statements. Instead, liberal analyst Mark Shields blamed it on Newt Gingrich, and his "clone" Donald Trump: 


The LGBT community is anything but monolithic—after all, its symbol is the rainbow. But when it comes to political ideology, Republicans often feel left out. While June is technically Pride Month, this year’s celebrations have focused more on resistance. And that, as NPR digital news intern Christianna Silva pointed out, has alienated many Trump supporters and right-leaning LGBT folks.


This sounds like a bad joke. While NPR is offering stories on how President Trump is corrupt enough for impeachment like Nixon the Sequel, they make time for stories about how American soldiers got PTSD because they formed a complex human bond with the prisoner they guarded before his hanging....Saddam Hussein. This actually happened. 

On Sunday morning, NPR posted an article by reporter Wade Goodwyn using the far-left Southern Poverty Law Center on "The Far Right's Language Explained." The inspiration for this article was the murder of two men in Portland who tried to defend a woman in a hijab on a subway train by an extremist named Jeremy Christian. 

Liberals generally avoid any reference to a "far left," since that would unfairly make Democrats sound synonymous with communists. But NPR had no problem using "far right" to describe murderous white nationalists on Sunday and the "Texas Freedom Caucus," a group of conservative Republican state legislators in Austin, on Saturday.


Geoffrey Dickens noted Charlie Rose interviewed Al Franken for most of his hour on Wednesday and never brought up Kathy Griffin. The same thing happened on the PBS NewsHour. And a search of National Public Radio transcripts comes up empty for Kathy Griffin stories.​ So much for public broadcasting standing against the coarsening of public discourse. (UPDATED: NPR media correspondent tweeted that he did a one-minute report in hourly newscasts.)


On Saturday morning's Weekend Edition, in the wake of the despicable bombing of the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, NPR host Scott Simon welcomed staunch atheist Richard Dawkins, author of (most notably) The God Delusion, to discuss the role of "religion" in terrorism. Simon tiptoed around singling out one particular religion as the most prone to terrorism in this century.


It was a high-drama week of big, anonymously-sourced anti-Trump scoops, and taxpayer-funded National Public Radio was ready to built momentum for impeachment. Its "Week in Review" panelists presented Trump as a crappy criminal, his team a "crew of vipers," and the American people by a "vast majority" wanting to end Trump's days in the White House. All this unanimity about Trump's extreme awfulness came on Friday's All Things Considered [Fakest Title Ever]. 


The sneering reaction to the death of Roger Ailes continued on CBS, Friday. NPR’s David Folkenflik attacked the Fox News founder for “fostering and exploiting divisions.” He also insisted that it was FNC that encouraged the “emphasis on opinion rather than reporting.” As though liberal journalists on ABC, CBS and NBC haven’t been doing that for decades. 


Kennedy apologists in media were surely shocked by what they witnessed on 60 Minutes this past Sunday -- acknowledgement of an episode in the life of Robert F. Kennedy that many liberals would prefer to keep hidden. In the wake of President Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey, the weekly CBS news magazine dusted off a 2014 interview with Comey from one year after he was appointed.


Seattle Mayor Ed Murray announced on Tuesday that he will not run for reelection as the city's mayor because of mounting allegations that he sexually abused underage boys in the 1980s. Press coverage has either ignored Murray's Democratic Party affiliation or buried it in related stories' late paragraphs.

This outcome also exposes a double standard in the Evergreen State press, and should (but probably won't) lead management at these outlets, particularly at the Seattle Times, to question why they chose not to report multiple allegations against Murray which first surfaced almost a decade ago.