By Tom Johnson | November 27, 2016 | 6:06 PM EST

In covering the recent presidential campaign, the mainstream media far too often made the perfect the enemy of the good, believes Leigh Gilmore -- “the good” in this case being synonymous with “Hillary Clinton.” Gilmore, a professor in the women's and gender studies department at Hillary’s undergraduate alma mater, Wellesley, claims that “the bias against Hillary Clinton was not simply a story the media reported -- it was the unexamined narrative the press repeated over and over...Why was the lie more persistent than the truth? Why was ‘Crooked Hillary’ a more compelling figure than ‘Fundamentally Honest Hillary’?”

By Tim Graham | November 26, 2016 | 8:07 PM EST

On their Friday Week in Politics segment on National Public Radio’s All Things Considered newscast, they discussed just how “ultraconservative” the early Trump cabinet picks are.  No one eight years ago discussed how “ultraliberal” Barack Obama’s administration would get.  But New York Times columnist David Brooks at least made this discussion of extremism amusing  by suggesting Trumpians were “headbanger Guns N' Roses conservatives.” This is amusing in part because GNR lead singer Axl Rose rants against Trump on Twitter.

By Jack Coleman | November 22, 2016 | 7:42 PM EST

Yet more evidence of a world turned upside down since Donald Trump won the presidency and charitable donations to the Clinton Foundation predictably plummeted -- National Public Radio is no longer a safe space for liberals to opine.

At least it wasn't early today for former congressman Barney Frank of Massachusetts, one of the main architects of the housing bubble that brought down the economy a decade ago and a man who has surprisingly managed to remain out of prison for his role in the debacle.

 

By Tom Blumer | November 4, 2016 | 10:00 PM EDT

A Wednesday column at Vanity Fair by former National Public Radio CEO Ken Stern started on a promising track, but ended up in the same place as the rest of the establishment press: Donald Trump must lose, even if the press has to abandon all semblance of fairness and objectivity to accomplish that task. Stern observed the obviously unbalanced presidential race coverage at the Washington Post with its "incredible array of (Donald) Trump-phobia" and "virtually no mention of Clinton or any other candidate." But then, as will be seen after the jump, he basically justified it all.

By Sarah Stites | November 1, 2016 | 11:35 AM EDT

On October 21, radio show This American Life featured a song imagining how President Obama feels about “flexing” “demagogue” Donald Trump. 

By Tim Graham | October 31, 2016 | 11:31 AM EDT

NPR’s anchor/activist Maria Hinojosa uncorked wacky Holocaust analogies on MSNBC on Saturday morning. Trump surrogate Steve Cortes dared to use the word “illegals” in a panel discussion, and Hinojosa made faces and broke out the language-police lecture. Somehow, it’s okay for Hinojosa to compare Trump to the Nazis and imply illegal aliens fear death camps, but you can’t say “illegal alien.”

By Tim Graham | October 27, 2016 | 9:46 PM EDT

NPR’s media correspondent David Folkenflik loves to report negative stories about Fox News, over and over again. Since July 6, he’s filed 16 negative reports on Fox News and the sexual-harassment lawsuits, leading to the departure of longtime boss Roger Ailes.

The least surprising story on Wednesday night’s All Things Considered was Folkenflik enjoying the Tuesday night Fox News fight between Megyn Kelly and Newt Gingrich. Like the other leftists, Folkenflik took the side of Kelly, scorning Gingrich as a finger-wagging old man losing voters for Trump.

By Tom Blumer | October 25, 2016 | 10:16 PM EDT

On Sunday, Hillary Campaign Manager Robby Mook dodged a question from Jake Tapper on CNN's State of the Union about indications that black turnout for the former Secretary of State in North Carolina during early voting has not been strong. Meanwhile, a black Trump supporter, who the press seems to believe can easily be turned into an object of ridicule, continues to run circles around them in interviews.

By Tim Graham | October 12, 2016 | 2:11 PM EDT

On Tuesday’s Morning Edition on National Public Radio, they turned to a liberal media eminence to explain just how easily Hillary Clinton is winning this election. Washington Post assistant managing editor David Maraniss was just an “Author” in their online headline. Armed with this authority, Maraniss proceeded to talk exactly like a hyperbolic MSNBC surrogate for the Clintons, claiming that Trump’s jail quip in the second debate proved Trump was “against everying about American democracy” and represented the view of a “tin-pot dictatorship in which politicians jail the other side.”

By Jack Coleman | October 9, 2016 | 10:49 AM EDT

They try, they really do, but those earnest sorts at state-run media known as National Public Radio can't hide their true colors.

This is especially true when the media outlet's reporters, editors and assorted hangers-on talk among themselves, as on the NPR Politics podcast.

By Matthew Balan | October 6, 2016 | 9:19 PM EDT

NPR's Morning Edition on Thursday donated four minutes of air time to pro-abortion group EMILY's List, and helped it promote its ad blitz to elect Hillary Clinton and other left-wing Democrats. Renee Montagne played a clip from one of the organization's ads, and gave its president, Stephanie Schriock, a platform to hype Mrs. Clinton as a "a champion for women and families."

By Matthew Balan | October 3, 2016 | 3:58 PM EDT

On NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday, John Burnett hyped the objections of a few residents of Gonzales, Texas to gun rights backers' use of the town's slogan from the Texas Revolution. Burnett played up how "some Gonzalians are taken aback to see that Second Amendment activists have appropriated 'Come and Take It,' and substituted an assault rifle for their hallowed cannon." However, he failed to explain that the slogan has its roots in the reply of a king from ancient Greece, who rebuked an enemy's demand to disarm.