By Brad Wilmouth | February 18, 2017 | 9:08 PM EST

On Saturday's AM Joy on MSNBC, after NewsMax's J.D. Hayworth appeared on a panel where he was outnumbered by liberals 3:1, host Joy Reid repeatedly attempted to race-bait the former Republican congressman with stories that ranged from false to misleading, and ended up kicking him off the show when she was dissatisfied with how he answered her questions. Reid: "I think we're done with this segment because you literally answered a non sequitur that's incredibly offensive. I'm going to let Rosie Perez talk about the -- thank you for being here. No, you know what, what an odd exchange."

By Carole Novielli | February 10, 2017 | 4:20 PM EST

A new report released by Live Action shows that many media outlets have been caught up in Planned Parenthood’s web of lies. The documented evidence shows that Planned Parenthood repeatedly lied to media outlets after they were exposed in undercover video footage offering assistance to investigators, posing as pimps prostituting minor girls. 

By Jack Coleman | February 2, 2017 | 7:33 PM EST

Don't you love it when a person on the public dime insults you? Well, perhaps you won't be hearing as much of it in the future from National Public Radio while you're helping pay their budget with your taxes. With President Trump vowing to end federal funding of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which oversees NPR and the Public Broadcasting Service, the frequent disparaging of conservatives by NPR talking heads might emanate instead from the dreaded private sector, assuming NPR and PBS can survive there.

By Tom Johnson | January 27, 2017 | 10:17 PM EST

Daily Kos founder and publisher Markos Moulitsas is pleased that “several media operations have decided to join reality [by] calling the Trump regime’s lies what they are -- lies.” Still stuck in unreality, according to Kos, is NPR, which, he alleged on Wednesday, “remains steadfastly committed to enabling the ruling regime’s propaganda efforts.” Kos fumed that “conservatives rally around conservative media, unified in message and purpose, while liberals consider themselves all superior because they listen to the soothing blather of NPR…Never forget --supposedly ‘liberal’ news outlets like CNN, the New York Times, and NPR were some of the biggest purveyors of bullshit stories on Clinton’s emails.”

By Tim Graham | January 20, 2017 | 9:44 PM EST

National Public Radio decided to greet the morning of Trump’s inauguration in the same way that it greeted the day after Trump’s surprising victory. They sought out black rage…in the person of author Attica Locke, who also writes for  the Fox drama Empire. She came to say this day marked “how much this country can’t stand black people,” and “doesn’t want Muslims here,” and “did not want a woman as leader.”

By Katie Yoder | January 13, 2017 | 12:13 PM EST

According to the new platform just released by the Women’s March, “women” only stands for “women who agree with us.”

By Matthew Balan | January 12, 2017 | 11:07 AM EST

Tuesday's All Things Considered on NPR played up the long-term effect of the anti-ObamaCare "death panel" talking point and labeled this phrase "fake news." Don Gonyea let President Obama; Anita Dunn, his former communications director; and a talking head from the left-wing Center for American Progress decry the "dishonest" message from ObamaCare opponents and lament the "lasting negative effect" of the "early disinformation campaign" against the law. He touted that "the false claims of death panels would be named the lie of the year by the fact-checking organization PolitiFact."

By Tim Graham | January 6, 2017 | 6:53 AM EST

NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik appeared on the NPR-produced midday show Here and Now on Wednesday to discuss Megyn Kelly’s move from Fox News to NBC. He twice praised her for “cannily” negotiating herself across the media spectrum -- strange new respect which might make a conservative think she’s headed straight to the left. Then came the jaw-dropper: He said she was "desperately hoping to get away from ideology" like....Diane Sawyer or Barbara Walters.

By Matthew Balan | January 4, 2017 | 3:40 PM EST

Danielle Kurtzleben played up in a Tuesday item for NPR's website that "just one of the 535 members of the new Congress" is nonreligious. Kurtzleben underlined that "the nation's top legislative body remains far more male and white than the rest of the U.S. population...but religion is one of the more invisible areas where legislators in Washington simply aren't representative of the people they represent." However, the correspondent later revealed that this members of this demographic hold some responsibility for this under-representation.

By Tim Graham | December 29, 2016 | 8:28 PM EST

Every nonprofit group is ending the year with a pitch for last-minute tax-exempt contributions, and that includes National Public Radio. NPR fans received an e-mail with the subject line "Bold, unbiased journalism." That's pretty funny coming from a network that puts a loving touch on Barack Obama in interviews and never secured an interview with Donald Trump.

Bob Dole in 1996 and Mitt Romney in 2012 also skipped an NPR interview.  So every GOP challenger in the last 20 years except George W. Bush skipped public radio. Doesn't that speak volumes?

By Tom Blumer | December 23, 2016 | 2:18 PM EST

Fear not for the future of investigative journalism. Rest assured that the folks at the Politico have poured significant journalistic resources into such efforts, delving into many all-important matters relating to Donald Trump and his new administration. Why, on Friday, its Darren Samuelsohn reported that Donald Trump's 2012 driver's license says he's 6'2" inches tall, while The Donald and one of his doctors say that he's 6'3". 

By Tim Graham | December 11, 2016 | 9:14 AM EST

National Public Radio likes to think it's about civility (not rudeness) and real news (not fake news). But when it comes to Donald Trump, on Friday night NPR became the promoter of a rude and disparaging joke on All Things Considered. Washington Post columnist and NPR contributor E. J. Dionne passed along a joke from unfunny leftist Andy Borowitz in The New Yorker: that Trump's picks were so contrary to the government's mission that next he would name Mexican drug kingpin "El Chapo" to run the DEA.