By Rich Noyes | January 17, 2017 | 8:55 AM EST

Millions of Americans will celebrate Donald Trump’s inauguration on Friday, but the vast majority of journalists probably won’t be among them — and it’s not their scrupulous “objectivity,” or a unique aversion to Trump’s personal style, that keeps them from joining the party. Reviewing the media’s inauguration coverage since 1989 finds that incoming Republican presidents receive little of the worshipful coverage that’s accompanied the ascension of Democratic presidents. Instead, journalists measure new presidents using their standard liberal yardstick.

By Rich Noyes | January 9, 2017 | 8:52 AM EST

With the Democratic Party defeated, ObamaCare set for repeal, and incoming President Donald Trump poised to revoke a host of his executive orders, Obama’s actual legacy will likely fall far short of what his media fan club once imagined. But one aspect of his place in history seems secure: Barack Obama has been the lucky recipient of more biased, positive “news” media coverage than any other President in history.

By Rich Noyes | December 25, 2016 | 9:52 AM EST

Looking back at the media’s track record on communism, one sees a press that was too willing to act as a mouthpiece for the world’s worst dictatorships, and too accepting of the perverse claim that communism meant safety and security for its people.

By Matthew Balan | December 16, 2016 | 11:47 AM EST

On Thursday, Newsweek's Lucy Westcott forwarded possible excuses for Yasmin Seweid's fake account about anti-Muslim men attacking her on New York City's subway. Westcott spotlighted an activist who played up that young Muslim women, like Seweid, are "children of either immigrant parents or U.S.-born Muslims, and parents have high expectations of them, putting [them under] tremendous pressure." She also pointed out an online post from Seweid's sister, who asked people to "think why Muslim [women of color] felt the need to do this."

By Curtis Houck | December 16, 2016 | 11:19 AM EST

Late Thursday afternoon, freelance journalist and editor Sebastian Jones dropped a friendly reminder for Twitter users how the media’s neglecting to recount the disturbing past of Newsweek writer Kurt Eichenwald and instead praising him ad nauseam for his investigative reporting looking into President-elect Donald Trump’s finances and connections to foreign governments. 

By Tom Blumer | December 15, 2016 | 11:38 PM EST

Thursday evening, Newsweek's Kurt Eichenwald appeared on Tucker Carlson's Fox News show. In a disgraceful performance which has to be seen to be believed, the obviously battle-prepped Eichenwald made an utter fool of himself. Apparently aware (or made aware) of how awful he was, he attempted to defend himself later Thursday in a 40-plus tweetstorm. It didn't help matters; the tweets were gone by 10 p.m.

By Tom Blumer | December 10, 2016 | 6:30 PM EST

The unsolicited "Step away from your Twitter account" advice Donald Trump is constantly receiving needs to be turned around on certain members of the media. One such person would be Kurt Eichenwald at Newsweek — except, as will be seen later, the magazine apparently lets him intemperately and obsessively tweet at will. In claiming that Donald Trump's victory rally audience in Iowa began booing at the mention of John Glenn, the first American astronaut to orbit the earth who died on Thursday.

By P.J. Gladnick | December 9, 2016 | 4:12 PM EST

Six years ago, Newsweek sold for a grand total of one dollar. Many would say that amount was way overpriced and one big reason is the completely unprofessional sick smear job they are pulling on Donald Trump. An example is an article written by their culture writer Ryan Bort who makes no attempt to hide his Trump hate. Bort uses a timeline of very bad years to exhibit his Trump Derangement Syndrome which is so far gone as to even include Trump in regards to the Bubonic Plague in the year 1347.

By Tom Blumer | December 3, 2016 | 4:34 PM EST

Did you know that some Donald Trump supporters actively advocated for repealing the 19th Amendment which gave women the right to vote almost a century ago? Or that Hillary Clinton, who memorably characterized half of Trump's supporters as "a basket of deplorables ... racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic, you name it," really "went high" as "her opponent went even lower" during the presidential campaign?

By now, many people know that Newsweek, which prepared alternative "Madam President" and "President Trump" editions for its post-presidential election issue, accidentally sent 125,000 copies of the "Madam President" edition to newsstands on Election Night. But that's not the real news here. What is far less known, and far more disturbing, is that the pulled "Madam President" edition includes the outrageous contentions just cited, as well as others which will be seen shortly.

By Tom Blumer | November 30, 2016 | 11:01 AM EST

On Tuesday, Zach Schonfeld, a senior writer for Newsweek, decided to mine what is "now a massive, unprecedented content graveyard of articles celebrating or analyzing Hillary Clinton's would-be historic victory," presenting "a small sampling ... of what the internet would have looked like on November 9 if Clinton beat Trump, as so many pundits forecast."

It's mildly entertaining, but it comes with heavy and offensive dose of smug self-importance.

By Rich Noyes | November 26, 2016 | 9:10 AM EST

Fidel Castro’s communist regime executed hundreds of political opponents and drove tens of thousands more into exile; hundreds of dissidents today languish in Cuban prisons. Yet liberals in the U.S. media — who rightly condemned such abuses when perpetrated by dictators such as Chile’s Augusto Pinochet — inexplicably remain enchanted with Castro and his socialist revolution. For almost 30 years, the Media Research Center has documented the liberal media’s infatuation with Fidel Castro and Cuba’s communism; details within.

By Matthew Balan | November 4, 2016 | 7:58 PM EDT

Newsweek's Alexander Nazaryan wildly claimed in a Thursday post on Twitter that "racist voter suppression" was the root cause of the statistical tie between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump in North Carolina, according to recent poll. The senior writer didn't explain what he specifically meant by his statement, but it could be a reference to a recent lawsuit filed by the NAACP that alleges that several counties in the Tarheel State "disproportionately target[ed] blacks" when they purged their voter rolls.