By Jeffrey Lord | February 18, 2017 | 3:11 PM EST

You might call it The Media versus America. The President of the United States held a press conference on Thursday. On that, everyone agreed. But after that? Words like “unhinged” a particular favorite to describe the event. Here’s a sample of the headline reaction.The New York Times: An Aggrieved President Moves His Surrogates Aside, The Washington Post: Debrief: In an erratic performance, Trump shows his supporters who’s boss

 

By P.J. Gladnick | February 15, 2017 | 9:14 PM EST

Excuse me, Newsweek, but who was ultimately responsible for establishing the Manzanar internment camp along with the other such camps which interned Japanese residents in the USA along with Japanese-American citizens during World War II? If you read this February 15 article by Newsweek senior writer Alexander Nazaryan you would think President Donald Trump who was born a year after that war ended was somehow responsible rather than the real culprit, President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In fact Nazaryan mentions Trump 26 times in the story while FDR appears only 3 times.

By Tom Blumer | February 7, 2017 | 9:38 PM EST

At the Media Research Center, the unhinged infamy of Nina Burleigh, who now toils at Newsweek as its national politics correspondent, goes back to years before NewsBusters began. Burleigh's most recent childish move is something one might expect from an unsupervised freshman writer at a high school newspaper. She has created a "Trump Warning System." It includes four icons, three of which are well-known current and former totalitarian dictators, as shorthand to categorize Donald Trump's presidential actions. It's every bit as pathetic it sounds.

By Jack Coleman | February 5, 2017 | 5:08 PM EST

Don't hold your breath awaiting Michael Wolff's next appearance on CNN. Then again, perhaps CNN keeps inviting Wolff because they've learned he's good for ratings. Here's one viewer who is definitely tuning in next time I know he'll be on. Shortly after Donald Trump's stunning victory in November, Wolff took fellow journalists to task for their collective fake outrage after Trump ditched them to enjoy dinner in New York City with his family, minus the media circus.

By P.J. Gladnick | February 1, 2017 | 6:59 PM EST

Vengeance is mine, sayeth the Newsweek writer! Newsweek senior writer Kurt Eichenwald admits that President Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, Neil Gorsuch, is "eminently qualified." However, he angrily proclaims that this nomination must be stopped because of a need for vengeance. Eichenwald doesn't try to hide that as an ulterior motive. In fact, he absolutely obsesses over it.

By Brad Wilmouth | January 29, 2017 | 7:57 PM EST

Appearing as a panel member on Sunday's Fareed Zakaria GPS on CNN, former MSNBC and Newsweek contributor Rula Jebreal had one of the biggest on-air blow-ups against a fellow liberal that you're likely to witness all year. As the group discussed President Donald Trump's recent executive order halting immigration from seven predominantly Muslim countries, after Jebreal repeatedly claimed that the order was in reality motivated by a "white supremacist agenda," liberal George Washington University law professor Jonathan Turley admonished her for making such inflammatory charges.

This did not sit well with Jebreal, who jumped in to shout at Turley for more than a minute as she accused him of defending a "Muslim ban" even though the liberal GWU professor was voicing opposition to the measure. Jebreal: "It is a Muslim ban, sir, and it is outrageous -- it's baffling that you are trying to normalize it or even defend it or justify it! You're betraying American values! This is outrageous!"

By Rich Noyes | January 17, 2017 | 8:55 AM EST

Millions of Americans will celebrate Donald Trump’s inauguration on Friday, but the vast majority of journalists probably won’t be among them — and it’s not their scrupulous “objectivity,” or a unique aversion to Trump’s personal style, that keeps them from joining the party. Reviewing the media’s inauguration coverage since 1989 finds that incoming Republican presidents receive little of the worshipful coverage that’s accompanied the ascension of Democratic presidents. Instead, journalists measure new presidents using their standard liberal yardstick.

By Rich Noyes | January 9, 2017 | 8:52 AM EST

With the Democratic Party defeated, ObamaCare set for repeal, and incoming President Donald Trump poised to revoke a host of his executive orders, Obama’s actual legacy will likely fall far short of what his media fan club once imagined. But one aspect of his place in history seems secure: Barack Obama has been the lucky recipient of more biased, positive “news” media coverage than any other President in history.

By Rich Noyes | December 25, 2016 | 9:52 AM EST

Looking back at the media’s track record on communism, one sees a press that was too willing to act as a mouthpiece for the world’s worst dictatorships, and too accepting of the perverse claim that communism meant safety and security for its people.

By Matthew Balan | December 16, 2016 | 11:47 AM EST

On Thursday, Newsweek's Lucy Westcott forwarded possible excuses for Yasmin Seweid's fake account about anti-Muslim men attacking her on New York City's subway. Westcott spotlighted an activist who played up that young Muslim women, like Seweid, are "children of either immigrant parents or U.S.-born Muslims, and parents have high expectations of them, putting [them under] tremendous pressure." She also pointed out an online post from Seweid's sister, who asked people to "think why Muslim [women of color] felt the need to do this."

By Curtis Houck | December 16, 2016 | 11:19 AM EST

Late Thursday afternoon, freelance journalist and editor Sebastian Jones dropped a friendly reminder for Twitter users how the media’s neglecting to recount the disturbing past of Newsweek writer Kurt Eichenwald and instead praising him ad nauseam for his investigative reporting looking into President-elect Donald Trump’s finances and connections to foreign governments. 

By Tom Blumer | December 15, 2016 | 11:38 PM EST

Thursday evening, Newsweek's Kurt Eichenwald appeared on Tucker Carlson's Fox News show. In a disgraceful performance which has to be seen to be believed, the obviously battle-prepped Eichenwald made an utter fool of himself. Apparently aware (or made aware) of how awful he was, he attempted to defend himself later Thursday in a 40-plus tweetstorm. It didn't help matters; the tweets were gone by 10 p.m.