By Tom Blumer | May 24, 2017 | 7:06 PM EDT

At NBC and Newsweek, it's still the late-1960s. The movie Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?, with its then-edgy portrayal of an engaged interracial couple visiting the white fiancee's parents, has recently debuted. Apparently the ink hasn't yet dried on the Supreme Court's Loving vs. Virginia decision, which nullified all remaining interracial marriage bans. What else can possibly explain the breathtakingly ignorant tweets emanating from those two media outlets acting as if America might not be ready for the idea that Rachel Lindsay, the first black woman in the history of The Bachelorette, might end up getting engaged to someone of another race?

By Clay Waters | May 23, 2017 | 5:29 PM EDT

The horrific terrorist attack against young concert-goers in Manchester, England. Newsweek magazine chose to highlight Conor Gaffey’s report from the city in its daily email. But in all-too-common pattern among the liberal press after an Islamic terrorist attack, Gaffey quickly changed the subject, skipping ahead of concern for the victims of Islamic terrorism straight to left-wing handwringing about hypothetical Islamophobia, even bringing Brexit into the discussion. “Muslims in Manchester Fear Reprisals as ISIS Claims Responsibility for Concert Attack."

By Rich Noyes | May 19, 2017 | 10:54 AM EDT

The liberal media are up in arms over President Trump’s labeling of the investigation into Russian hacking and the 2016 presidential campaign a “witch hunt.” All three broadcast networks led their Thursday evening newscasts with Trump’s use of the phrase, with NBC’s Lester Holt saying Trump was “lashing out.” Yet long before Donald Trump arrived in Washington, liberal reporters themselves employed the “witch hunt” slogan to discredit investigations into their Democratic friends, especially Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama. But now that Trump uses the same tactic, it’s somehow deplorable?

By Tom Blumer | May 9, 2017 | 10:55 PM EDT

The Associated Press had a variety of howlers from Democrats and leftists it could have included in its May 8 (update on May 9) "fact check" roundup based on events of the past week. As those who have watched the wire service's conduct since the 2016 election campaign could have predicted, it included none, and instead solely went after the Trump administration and GOP politicians on nine different claims.

By Kristine Marsh | May 8, 2017 | 2:52 PM EDT

Newsweek writer Kurt Eichenwald has no problem using his platform as a member of the media to hurl death threats against those whom he disagrees with. After House Republicans passed the AHCA last Thursday, the liberal writer took to Twitter to air his grievances against the bill by wishing that their family members would be tortured and die. (Yes, really.)

By Jeffrey Lord | February 18, 2017 | 3:11 PM EST

You might call it The Media versus America. The President of the United States held a press conference on Thursday. On that, everyone agreed. But after that? Words like “unhinged” a particular favorite to describe the event. Here’s a sample of the headline reaction.The New York Times: An Aggrieved President Moves His Surrogates Aside, The Washington Post: Debrief: In an erratic performance, Trump shows his supporters who’s boss

 

By P.J. Gladnick | February 15, 2017 | 9:14 PM EST

Excuse me, Newsweek, but who was ultimately responsible for establishing the Manzanar internment camp along with the other such camps which interned Japanese residents in the USA along with Japanese-American citizens during World War II? If you read this February 15 article by Newsweek senior writer Alexander Nazaryan you would think President Donald Trump who was born a year after that war ended was somehow responsible rather than the real culprit, President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In fact Nazaryan mentions Trump 26 times in the story while FDR appears only 3 times.

By Tom Blumer | February 7, 2017 | 9:38 PM EST

At the Media Research Center, the unhinged infamy of Nina Burleigh, who now toils at Newsweek as its national politics correspondent, goes back to years before NewsBusters began. Burleigh's most recent childish move is something one might expect from an unsupervised freshman writer at a high school newspaper. She has created a "Trump Warning System." It includes four icons, three of which are well-known current and former totalitarian dictators, as shorthand to categorize Donald Trump's presidential actions. It's every bit as pathetic it sounds.

By Jack Coleman | February 5, 2017 | 5:08 PM EST

Don't hold your breath awaiting Michael Wolff's next appearance on CNN. Then again, perhaps CNN keeps inviting Wolff because they've learned he's good for ratings. Here's one viewer who is definitely tuning in next time I know he'll be on. Shortly after Donald Trump's stunning victory in November, Wolff took fellow journalists to task for their collective fake outrage after Trump ditched them to enjoy dinner in New York City with his family, minus the media circus.

By P.J. Gladnick | February 1, 2017 | 6:59 PM EST

Vengeance is mine, sayeth the Newsweek writer! Newsweek senior writer Kurt Eichenwald admits that President Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, Neil Gorsuch, is "eminently qualified." However, he angrily proclaims that this nomination must be stopped because of a need for vengeance. Eichenwald doesn't try to hide that as an ulterior motive. In fact, he absolutely obsesses over it.

By Brad Wilmouth | January 29, 2017 | 7:57 PM EST

Appearing as a panel member on Sunday's Fareed Zakaria GPS on CNN, former MSNBC and Newsweek contributor Rula Jebreal had one of the biggest on-air blow-ups against a fellow liberal that you're likely to witness all year. As the group discussed President Donald Trump's recent executive order halting immigration from seven predominantly Muslim countries, after Jebreal repeatedly claimed that the order was in reality motivated by a "white supremacist agenda," liberal George Washington University law professor Jonathan Turley admonished her for making such inflammatory charges.

This did not sit well with Jebreal, who jumped in to shout at Turley for more than a minute as she accused him of defending a "Muslim ban" even though the liberal GWU professor was voicing opposition to the measure. Jebreal: "It is a Muslim ban, sir, and it is outrageous -- it's baffling that you are trying to normalize it or even defend it or justify it! You're betraying American values! This is outrageous!"

By Rich Noyes | January 17, 2017 | 8:55 AM EST

Millions of Americans will celebrate Donald Trump’s inauguration on Friday, but the vast majority of journalists probably won’t be among them — and it’s not their scrupulous “objectivity,” or a unique aversion to Trump’s personal style, that keeps them from joining the party. Reviewing the media’s inauguration coverage since 1989 finds that incoming Republican presidents receive little of the worshipful coverage that’s accompanied the ascension of Democratic presidents. Instead, journalists measure new presidents using their standard liberal yardstick.