By Clay Waters | February 26, 2017 | 11:26 AM EST

Sunday’s New York Times featured the latest installment in easily-freaked media reporter Jim Rutenberg’s crusade against President Trump: “Trump’s Undermining Reporters May Haunt Republicans.” The online headline foreshadowed Rutenberg’s unlikely attempt to enlist Republicans in defense of the press and against Trump: “Will the Real Democracy Lovers Please Stand Up?” while the text box delivered an empty threat: “This strategy could push Republicans into a corner later.” Rutenberg made no acknowledgement of the increasingly unconcealed anti-Trump partisanship displayed by the media, including his own newspaper and own column.

By Tom Blumer | February 25, 2017 | 5:24 PM EST

Earlier this week, Baltimore Orioles executive vice president and chief operating officer John Angelos said that he wouldn't want President Donald Trump to throw out the first pitch at his team's Camden Yards home opener until Trump "retract(s) all these outrageous things that have been said and simply apologize(s)." Most coverage of this story has failed to report that Angelos's father Peter is a longtime, heavy-contributing Democratic Party operative, while no one has questioned John's disingenuous claim of non-partisanship.

By Clay Waters | February 24, 2017 | 5:20 PM EST

Politicizing sports -- it’s not just for ESPN anymore! No longer seeing sports as a respite from politics, the New York Times has joined the game of pestering and trying to pin down athletes suspected of secret anti-Trump tendencies, while celebrating supporters of illegal immigrants and Black Lives Matter protests: "Of the 56 players polled, 50 -- or 89.3 percent -- said they would play golf with Trump if asked....The results were hardly surprising. The clubhouses at PGA Tour stops have long trended Republican, and the sport’s target demographic -- rich, mostly white men -- is far different from the women, minorities, immigrants and Muslims who have at times been the most offended by the president’s statements and positions."

By Kyle Drennen | February 24, 2017 | 11:47 AM EST

On Thursday, The New York Times launched a new marketing campaign by releasing a TV ad set to air during Sunday’s Academy Awards with the tag line, “The truth is more important than ever,” seemingly taking a jab at President Donald Trump. Given the paper’s blatant liberal bias and willingness to report fake news stories, the notion that the Times is the arbiter of the “truth” is laughable.

By Tom Blumer | February 24, 2017 | 8:30 AM EST

In June, the City of Philadelphia, in what was hailed as a "historic moment for public health," passed a deliberately misnamed 1.5-cent per ounce "soda tax." What anyone with a lick of sense could have predicted would happen is happening, and the national press is mostly ignoring the tragic results.

By Scott Whitlock | February 23, 2017 | 3:59 PM EST

The New York Times’s liberal columnist Charles Blow railed against the very idea of “reaching out to Donald Trump voters,” dismissing it as impossible considering how “backward-thinking” and bigoted his voters are. In a February 23 screed entitled “The Death of Compassion,” Blow compared, “Just like Donald Trump’s path to victory, Reagan’s was strewn with racial hostilities and prejudicial lies.”

By Clay Waters | February 23, 2017 | 11:22 AM EST

New York Times reporter Vivian Yee made the front page with the paper’s favorite liberal hobbyhorse, illegal immigration, or as the Times now puts it, “undocumented.” It's the issue the paper is most aggressively liberal on, and the fearful tone of the piece is captured in the headline, which skips journalistic objectivity in favor of emotionalism: “Migrants Hide, Fearing Capture on ‘Any Corner.’”

By Cal Thomas | February 22, 2017 | 10:36 PM EST

The traditional media have decided not to take President Trump's insults lying down. After what may be the strongest -- and to his supporters -- most thrilling takedown of journalists by any president, Editor and Publisher magazine featured this headline: "Newspapers Aim to Ride 'Trump Bump' to Reach Readers, Advertisers."

 

By Brad Wilmouth | February 22, 2017 | 9:07 PM EST

Appearing as a guest on Tuesday's CNN Tonight, New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof declared that he feels "very nervous" about the Trump administration's recent efforts to increase deportation of illegal immigrants, and ended up discussing his latest column, titled, "How Can We Get Rid of Trump?" which describes how the 25th Amendment could be used to remove President Donald Trump from office as an alternative to impeachment.

By P.J. Gladnick | February 21, 2017 | 7:16 PM EST

Long before the fake news reports by such fake news New York Times reporters as Jayson Blair and Herbert Matthews, there was fake news reporter Walter Duranty who wrote fake news stories about Joseph Stalin's 1932/33 systematic starvation of Ukrainian peasants...the Holodomor. Although Duranty has been written about in the past, movie audiences will soon see him portrayed on the big screen.

By Tom Blumer | February 21, 2017 | 11:39 AM EST

The Tuesday Morning Briefing at the New York Times tells us that President Donald Trump, at his rally in Melbourne, Florida on Saturday, "claimed that Sweden was experiencing a crisis because of immigration" and had "suggested that a terrorist attack had occurred there the night before." Concerning the latter, Trump said no such thing, nor did he "suggest" it. Concerning the former, if Sweden's not in crisis, it had a funny way of showing it Monday night, as there were riots in Stockholm.

By Tom Blumer | February 20, 2017 | 9:43 PM EST

Donald Trump, like virtually every president before him, is upset that there have been leaks to the news media (and heaven knows who else) from his administration. In his Thursday press conference, Trump emphasized that leaks of classified information or matters relating to national security are "criminal" acts — because they are — and promised to pursue the leakers. That, and Trump's Friday afternoon tweet — that "The FAKE NEWS media ... is the enemy of the American People!" — was apparently enough to send the Washington Post's Margaret Sullivan scurrying under her bed, shaking in fear. Spare me the hysteria.