The Democrats just blew $30 million on the most expensive congressional race in history and all they have to show for it is a lousy participation trophy.

Perhaps the Democrats would have been better off using that money to erect a temple to the Weather Gods. A frustrated Eric Levitz at New York magazine makes the case that the "Weather Gods" seemed to have been conspiring against Jon Ossoff in the June 20 special election in the Sixth Congressional District in Georgia. Fifty minutes before the polls closed for that election, Levitz noted how perfectly the weather aligned against Ossoff by observing that "Karen Handel Gets Last-Minute Endorsement From Weather Gods."


Liberals have gotten so over the top melodramatic about the supposed dire consequences of the announcement by President Donald Trump that the United States is withdrawing from the Paris Climate Agreement that they have turned themselves into laughingstocks. One of the more hilarious examples is their comparison of the Marine Jazz Band playing on the White House lawn shortly before the announcment to the Titanic band playing "Nearer My God To Thee." Not only do the two bands have completely different sounds as we shall hear but where would you rather have been; On the White House lawn or the deck of the sinking Titanic?

“Between Donald Trump and anything resembling Christianity,” there is only a great void -- a “vast, empty, and dark space,” declared gay Catholic pundit Sullivan in a Friday column for New York magazine. Sullivan described Trump as “neither religious nor irreligious. He is pre-religious. He is a pagan. He makes much more sense as a character in Game of Thrones, a medieval world bereft of the legacy of Jesus of Nazareth, than as a president of a modern, Western country...I will never understand how more than half of white Catholics could vote for such a man, or how the leadership of the church could be so terribly silent when such a monster stalks the earth.”


The Associated Press, PolitiFact, CNN, Snopes and all of the other "fact-checkers" should be busy this weekend and well into next week vetting the howlers contained in Rebecca Traister's New York Magazine Friday afternoon interview of a politician who has been in the public eye for decades. But it's a virtual lock that they won't bother, because the person Traister interviewed was Hillary Clinton.


The Associated Press had a variety of howlers from Democrats and leftists it could have included in its May 8 (update on May 9) "fact check" roundup based on events of the past week. As those who have watched the wire service's conduct since the 2016 election campaign could have predicted, it included none, and instead solely went after the Trump administration and GOP politicians on nine different claims.


Early Thursday morning, New York Magazine published an online item which claimed that "rape is a pre-existing condition" under the health care bill which has passed in the House. As Reason.com noted, "None of this is true. Like, not even a little bit." That appears not to be the point, though. The point of engaging in such irresponsibility appears to have been to get it out there so that at least some people who never learn about the "correction" end up believing the original false claims. In other words, it's shamelessly produced fake news.


Whatever was the matter with Kansas when Thomas Frank wrote his book is now less daunting for the left, believes New York magazine’s Eric Levitz, who contended in a Wednesday piece that the closeness of this week’s House special election in the Wichita-centric 4th District appears to spell trouble for conservatives.


Appearing as a guest on Friday's Hardball, MSNBC's Joy Reid claimed that Donald Trump's voters wanted him to "get all the brown people" off Obamacare instead of themselves. And then, following up on her AM Joy show the next morning, she hosted New York magazine columnist Frank Rich to discuss his latest article, "No Sympathy for the Hillbilly," in which he argued that Democrats are misguided in thinking that spending more time being sympathetic to Trump voters will lead them to future electoral success as they should work to boost their base turnout instead.


On Tuesday's Tavis Smiley show on PBS, as New York magazine's Andrew Sullivan appeared as a guest to discuss current political events, host Smiley at one point fretted that -- because Republicans denied President Barack Obama the chance to appoint Judge Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court -- they were "trampling" on the Constitution, and oddly asked if they might ignore other parts of the Constitution like the abolition of slavery or the right for women to vote. Suggesting that Republicans violated the Constitution in blocking Judge Garland, Smiley whined: "It was, to be sure, a violation of democratic norms, but it was more than that. To me, it was a trampling on the Constitution by the Republican party who did not give Mr. Garland a hearing. ... He was obligated to put forth that nomination, and they were obligated to take it up, I believe, and vote up or down. So it wasn't just a violation or an abrogation of norms, it was a trampling on one of our most precious documents."


On Tuesday night, one of the crazier news nights since Election Day occurred when MSNBC host Rachel Maddow failed on a level akin to Geraldo Rivera and Al Capone’s vault when she falsely claimed to have a bombshell exclusive (that wasn’t hers) in the form of President Trump’s 2005 tax returns.


This past Tuesday, three prominent left-wing writers examined Paul Ryan’s health-care bill; what they see as the typical Republican attitude toward health insurance; and the modern GOP as a whole. Unsurprisingly, they found all three wanting. For example, Talking Points Memo editor and publisher Josh Marshall contended that on occasions like this that call for wonkery, Republicans are ill-equipped to deliver it, inasmuch as they’ve “spent years since 2008 (actually before but especially since 2008) stoking their base with increasingly fantastical and ridiculous claims.”


How is Donald Trump “not a normal Republican”? Let New York magazine’s Jonathan Chait count the ways. Trump is “crudely ethno-nationalist,” wrote Chait in a Tuesday post, and he’s “personally ignorant and undisciplined in a manner that sets him apart not only from traditional Republicans but most human adults.” That’s pretty much it for Trump’s deviations from orthodoxy, according to Chait, who thinks current White House economic and fiscal proposals are “perfectly orthodox” by party standards, notwithstanding blasts at them from GOP-aligned sources such as National Review.