By Brent Bozell | and By Tim Graham | January 30, 2016 | 7:58 AM EST

For a conservative, perhaps nothing in popular culture is more amusing than watching leftist Hollywood beat itself up with the battle cry “Oscars So White.” For a group of people that can’t possibly assemble at awards shows without making egregious displays of what passes for “progressive thought,” this fight over putative racism is as entertaining as the movies themselves. Grab some popcorn.

By Mairead McArdle | January 26, 2016 | 4:03 PM EST

Miss Sloane, a gun-control drama that is sure to bring tears to the eyes of all those who believe that federal top-down gun-control is the answer to preventing mass shootings, just added another star to its cast list.

By Mairead McArdle | January 26, 2016 | 12:02 PM EST

The entertainment types that form Hillary Clinton's Hollywood base continue to show up in Iowa, trying to dig the political superstar out of her growing deficit to geriatric Vermont socialist Bernie Sanders. Last week it was pop tart Demi Lovato in an effort to reach young women. On Sunday, it was actress Jamie Lee Curtis (Trading Places, Freaky Friday) in an eforrt to reach ... not young women. Curtis offered a sweeping endorsement of the Democratic presidential candidate based on a dubious principle.

By Tim Graham | January 24, 2016 | 7:57 AM EST

Tiny actor-director Danny DeVito can make a big charge of American racism on the controversy over the all-white acting nominations for the Academy Awards.

“It’s unfortunate that the entire country is a racist country. So it’s an example of the fact that even though some great people have given some great performances in movies, they weren’t even thought about. We are living in a country that discriminates and has certain racist tendencies

By Tim Graham | January 23, 2016 | 9:45 PM EST

Friday night’s PBS NewsHour awarded a Muslim leftist with a typical essay on “diversity” in Hollywood. It carried the title “Why the world could use a Muslim jedi.”

Anchor Hari Sreenivasan explained: What better way to battle discrimination than with pop culture? Or so thought Haroon Moghul, when he asked J.J. Abrams in an open letter to add an Islamic character to “Star Wars.” Here’s more of his thoughts on why a Jedi named Mohammad could help fight fear with hope.” So is Haroon Moghul uniquely poised to preach hope and not hate? His Twitter feed says no.

By Matt Philbin | January 21, 2016 | 10:29 AM EST

So get this: A new documentary about Anthony (Carlos Danger) Weiner, former New York Congressman and serial cyber flasher, may have contained embarrassing content. Oh, not about Weiner – we’ve known for a long time that he’s incapable of embarrassment. No, it’s the Clinton presidential campaign that might be embarrassed. 

By Tom Johnson | January 19, 2016 | 11:49 AM EST

The Dallas-Fort Worth area is, of course, part of the Bible Belt. Nonetheless, according to Christopher Hooks, another faith flourishes there: “It’s also a place that’s responsible in large part for the rise of the new civic religion built around the worship of the most lethal among us.”

Hooks, an Austin-based journalist, was one of about 30,000 persons who attended last week’s world premiere of 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi at AT&T Stadium, best known as the home of the Dallas Cowboys. He detailed what he saw in a Friday article for Gawker, the gossipy New York website that of late has become much more politics-oriented. Though Hooks found 13 Hours technically accomplished, he asserted that its “moral landscape…is poisonous.”

By Tom Johnson | January 16, 2016 | 12:07 PM EST

During the 1980s, a favorite talking point of liberals was that President Reagan tended to confuse movies with reality. In a Friday article, Zack Beauchamp accused a current Republican presidential candidate, Ted Cruz, of doing something similar, and alleged that the GOPers who took part in Thursday’s prime-time debate stand for a “view of the world [that] is as much a work of fiction as” Michael Bay's new film, 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi.

Towards the end of the debate, Cruz touted 13 Hours. Beauchamp commented, “The movie portrays politicians as ‘abandoning’ the Americans in Benghazi. But in reality, that is a conspiracy theory that has been roundly debunked…This moment, Cruz citing a fictitious movie as truth, was of a piece with the debate as a whole. In it, much of conversation about world affairs existed in a make-believe world, and a terrifying one at that, in which the very existence of America is in perilous danger. In other words, it wasn't just Ted Cruz who was living in a fiction last night — it was the entire stage.”

By Matt Philbin | January 14, 2016 | 12:36 PM EST

Paramount Pictures is releasing 13 Hours: Secret Soldiers of Benghazi nation-wide on Friday. It tells the story of the attack on two U.S. diplomatic outposts in Benghazi, Libya on September 11, 2012 that took four American lives, including that of the U.S. Ambassador to Libya. Despite claims from Paramount and director Michael Bay that the film isn’t political (the book on which it’s based certainly wasn’t), The Hollywood Reporter has noted that it’s being marketed specifically to conservatives.

So they’re specifically targeting one side of the political aisle while more or less neglecting the other? Well, yeah. You don’t shop kryptonite to Superman.

By Kyle Drennen | January 11, 2016 | 3:36 PM EST

On her MSNBC show on Monday, host Andrea Mitchell derided the film 13 Hours, opening in theaters nationwide on Friday: “That new film about Benghazi coming out this week could give wider circulation to conspiracy theories, despite denials, that CIA operatives were told to stand down and not rescue four Americans, including an ambassador, who died in that assault.”

By Tom Johnson | December 28, 2015 | 10:06 PM EST

In his new documentary, Where to Invade Next, Michael Moore jaunts around Europe showcasing what he deems enlightened social and economic policies, including Italy’s lengthy paid vacations, Norway’s treatment of prison inmates, and France’s school-lunch program. New York Times reviewer Stephen Holden observed that Moore’s “examples…are cherry-picked to make American audiences feel envious and guilty.”

On Monday, Salon ran an interview with Moore in which he talked about the movie as well as the U.S. presidential campaign. One of his comments: "I also think it’s a little gauche for Americans to point out to anybody in the world what their problems are at this point…I think we need a little time in the timeout room, you know what I’m saying? A little chill-down from running around the world: ‘You need democracy! Now you need democracy!’”

By Tom Johnson | December 24, 2015 | 11:16 AM EST

By the late summer of 1977, Jimmy Carter had been president for only a few months, but if you knew which way the cultural and political winds were blowing, he seemed unlikely to win a second term. That’s because on May 25 of that year, Star Wars had opened, and its colossal success both foreshadowed and helped to revive a mindset that carried Ronald Reagan to the White House. That’s the word from Perlstein, who laid out his theory last Friday in The Washington Spectator.